Are you a switchman? (3)

In the March thread Are you a switchman? (2) the question was asked, "Were diagrams ever used in the real world or was it more a process handled via arranging paper orders?".
For years I kept some of my old switch lists in my wealth of unneeded stuff, but they are gone now.  It would have been nice to scan some of them into this thread.   So, I just made up a simplistic list that would be similar (but much smaller) to one we would kick out at the Goodyear tire mfg plant near Lawton, OK.

Eagle

Our lists were always compiled in such a way that the cars on each track were listed east-to-west.  In other words, the top listed car was the easternmost car on that track...it gives no indication if it is "first out" or not.  Reporting marks were listed in a column and a status listed in the adjacent column similar to the example above.         

eagle

Our pretend list is for working the warehouse tracks 1 and 2.  You will pull loads which are indicated by a destination number and re-spot hold cars.  Your empties will come from Storage 1  and 2.   Lawton is station G630, so cars for G723 will go west (and be delivered to the FW&D).  Cars for G540 will go east to OKC.

The drawing is only schematic in nature.  The unlabeled tracks reading right to left are Mainline, Belt, Storage 1, Storage 2, and Runaround.  We switched at the west end of the yard because the Belt formed a long tail track before it tied into the main.  We would dig our spot cars out of Storage 1 and 2 and kick them to Runaround, then shove to the warehouse without having to do runaround moves.  Are some of you bewildered yet?

Some points to consider:  Where will you put your empties while you dig your pulls out of the warehouse?  and where will you set your pulls?  How will you utilize the west portion of #2 keeping in mind you can spot both warehouse tracks from #1.  West cars will be "lined up west" on the tail track portion of the Belt for easy p/u by the next WB train.  East cars will be taken back to the Lawton yard and "lined up east" for easy p/u by the next eastward man. The Lawton yard is about 5 miles east of the plant.

We aren't going to address the other half of the plant (not drawn in) with about 6 additional tracks for: bulk rubber, carbon black, naphtha, petroleum wax, and even a coal track for the steam power plant.

Let's hear your input...

 

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Original Post

Rob,

Wow. Thanks for taking the time to answer the general question and then create a "simplified" scenario for us.  I haven't done a good job of keeping up with my Real Trains digest reading lately, but luckily your post just popped up.  I will try and wrap my head around the puzzle later this week with pencil and paper in hand.

Tomlinson Run Railroad

Hey Rob... Can you leave empties on tracks 1 or  2?   I think my first move would be to  couple on to warehouse track #1 with the engine and set the loads out to track 3... Then same thing with warehouse track #2 set loads  to track 3. All the loads out are now in track 3   ( 8 cars right? )

I'm not going any further until I find out if I'm getting way-freight or Road switcher rates.

For Gregg,

We would come out with everything including our HOLD cars. In our scenario there are hold cars that could be left inside, but we would bring them out to catch our kick cars.  The real Lawton warehouse was just under 1000' feet long and each track inside held 16 fifty-footers. And we didn't want to make noisy joints inside the warehouse or have cars drifting where we could not see.

There are many questions left unanswered when I post these things. In the previous puzzle Big Jim alluded to the allowance of continuous shoving on a track to make multiple joints and call it 1 move (that is what we would have done as long as it was safe).

If anyone has an old switch list, please do us a service and scan it in.

 

Rob Leese posted:

For Gregg,

We would come out with everything including our HOLD cars. In our scenario there are hold cars that could be left inside, but we would bring them out to catch our kick cars.  The real Lawton warehouse was just under 1000' feet long and each track inside held 16 fifty-footers. And we didn't want to make noisy joints inside the warehouse or have cars drifting where we could not see.

There are many questions left unanswered when I post these things. In the previous puzzle Big Jim alluded to the allowance of continuous shoving on a track to make multiple joints and call it 1 move (that is what we would have done as long as it was safe).

If anyone has an old switch list, please do us a service and scan it in.

 

Rob,
Take your pick: Switch Lists

The link in Big Jim's reply brings up another aspect that hasn't yet been mentioned; hand written switch lists made by station agents who didn't care to type versus typed or machine printed lists.  Our OKC yard switch lists were generated from stacks of IBM punch cards sending the data to a dot matrix printer that sounded like a giant mosquito.  Those lists were easy to read.  Down the line either direction it was a tossup if you got a typed list or a hand written list.  Good old George, whose photo is in the Hofsommer book The Quanah Route was a great character, but whose handwriting resembled ancient runes.

Big Jim's link sure shows some major diversity.  Some list formats seem easier to read than others.  Rob, I'm particularly intrigued by your mention of IBM punch cards (been there, done that).  Who would typically be the one to generate those?  The station agent?  The end result, as you say, must have been nice but the effort to get there may have been an entirely different story.  One wrong punch and it's start all over.   Of course, a good conductor would have lots of experience punching holes in paper .

Interesting additions to the initial puzzle.

Tomlinson Run Railroad

TomlinsonRunRR posted:

Big Jim's link sure shows some major diversity.  Some list formats seem easier to read than others.  Rob, I'm particularly intrigued by your mention of IBM punch cards (been there, done that).  Who would typically be the one to generate those?  The station agent?  The end result, as you say, must have been nice but the effort to get there may have been an entirely different story.  One wrong punch and it's start all over.   Of course, a good conductor would have lots of experience punching holes in paper .

Interesting additions to the initial puzzle.

Tomlinson Run Railroad

In my experience, punch card lists/consists, et. al., only happened at major terminals. Clerks might make a list tracks if the on line yard was big enough to have a clerk. Otherwise, the agent did that if on duty and if not, the conductor made his list of tracks. Agents wrote out instructions as to what work needed to be done. Some were better at it than others. 

Switch lists like many of those shown in the link were written by the conductor and turned in to the yardmaster with the other paperwork and should have contained the proper order of the cars in the train as they were brought into the terminal and marked if they were loaded (unmarked if they were mty).

Image result for Railroad switch List

CR10 reports did not need to have cars listed in proper order (although most conductors did), but, needed to show where the cars were picked up, their content and approx. tonnage.

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