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shingle sheets

OGR Forum Member
 
May 3, 2012 10:46 AM

I model houses of all of my family members.  My son and family just bought a new house so I'm getting things organized  to build it.

 

The house has dimensional shingles.  Every house that I've done so far had traditional 3-tab shingles (a long time ago I bought what I thought would be a life-time's worth of the shingle sheets from Holgate and Reynolds when they were still in business. I've used them all up - too bad because they were more realistic than anything on the market today).

 

I cannot find anyone that makes styrene (or comparable plastic) dimensional shingle sheets.  I looked in the list of suppliers and did internet searches, but came up empty.  I found one place that offered paper prints of dimensional shingles but I don't want paper.  Two reasons:

1. I need to paint the shingles the exact color as my son's.

2. I like the 3-D look that styrene sheets gives.

bonus reason: I can't find the site any longer !  don't remember how i got to it in the first place.

 

I found some places that offer plastic sheets of cedar shingles.  For those that have seen these in person, do you think that they would pass as dimensional shingles in a pinch?

 

Here's Plastrut's offering:

plastruct

 

Here's another site's offering - if might be Plastruct's being sold by them though.

shingles

 

Hobbylinc:

hobblinc

 
 
 
Photos (3)
plastruct
 
 
 
OGR Forum Member
 
May 3, 2012 11:21 AM

I was sorry to find that Holgate and Reynolds was gone, too, when I used what little

I had...I do not like any of the shingles I CAN EASILY FIND...either they LOOK plastic,

(too rounded at the edges) or they are printed with  no dimension.  Some of what can be found from certain kit makers, I am trying to think of one in Tennessee, is better, but I don't THINK they have dimensional, modern, shingles.  Earlier, split wooden, etc.

shingles seem more commonly available, and too early, usually, for what I model.

I do not think what you have shown is a good replacement.  I have thought of cutting

up some of the printed stuff, line by line, and overlaying it, like laying real shingles,

to get the effect.  Tedious, and do not think that will match modern dimensionals.

I hope somebody responds with good source(s) for all kinds of shingles.

 
 
 
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OGR Forum Member
 
May 3, 2012 11:59 AM

Builders-in-scale, part of CC Crow both are listed on the Source list, Building and Scenery Forum.

Truewood Shingles.

 
 
 
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mwb offline
OGR Forum Member
 
May 3, 2012 12:14 PM

Evergreen Hill Designs also used to sell a variety of real wood shingles

 

No, no, no....  You obviously have not been paying attention to what I'm about to tell you...

 
 
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OGR Forum Member
 
May 3, 2012 12:49 PM

i tried the plastruct 3 tab shingles #91631 and they didnt look too bad here is a sample of a sheet and one i finished:

 

002

 

but it still wasnt the look i wanted plus i was doing a hip roof so needed trim etc etc so i took the vulcan approach and cut them out of acrylic gauge paper...it was pretty easy cause they are large compared to doing it with bricks!!  anyway it takes paint and sealer really well here is the hip roof i did using this technique....btw, i used rubber cement the kind we use to use for science project backboards to glue them but there are plenty of ways to make em stick!!

 

 

006

 
 
 
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OGR Forum Member
 
May 3, 2012 4:55 PM

Walt,

 

We're looking forward to seeing your new house build, your homes are awesome.

Leslie also made shingles with acrylic canvas paper, cutting them into strips on a paper cutter twice the width of the shingles and then snipping 1/2 way up with scissors along the length.  She then glued them to graph paper to keep the rows straight, overlapping and alternating the cuts like shown here.  Then glued the whole thing to thin plywood which was the roof.

 

003

 

You can see a finished product here:

 

http://www.jcstudiosinc.com/Bl...13&categoryId=45

 

 

Jim M

Check the Scenery Sourcelist first!

 

Member of the J&C Studios Archive - building a permanent archive of great O-Gauge content!

Last edited by Jim M May 3, 2012 5:26 PM
 
 
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DPC offline
OGR Forum Member
 
May 3, 2012 8:47 PM

If you had a Paper cutter like they have at schools or a business and you cut slots in the table part and mounted blades 90 degress on to the blade thats on it now could it be modified to cut shingles? You may have to have a matching strip of metal with slots that would lay over the sheet and sandwich it between the table and the strip.
You could have another cutter the would be set for depth to cut the individual rows .

Then you'd only have to make 2 cuts per row of shingles?

David

 
 
 
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OGR Forum Member
 
May 4, 2012 12:30 AM

Ahh, once again I refer you all to Rusty Stumps.    Russ

 

http://www.rustystumps.com/products.asp?id=24

 

Please have a visit to:

http://www.hobby-tronics.com/1940DRGW/

OGR since Sept 2006.

 
 
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OGR Forum Member
 
May 4, 2012 11:15 AM

For those that brought up 3-tab shingles, I'm not ready to give up yet on finding dimensional.  But I will keep the suggestions in mind, be assured of that!

 

ChiloquinRuss: I THINK that I did visit that site.  The one sheet that looked promising was this one but I couldn't tell what material it is.  The peel and stick comment made me think paper.  Does anyone know?  I guess I could ask the dealer.

Product ID: D5510
O Scale Siding Shingles
In Stock: 26
O Scale Siding Shingles

These laser cut simulated Siding Shingles come on two sheets to a package. The strips are permanent self-adhesive, just peel and stick, real easy to install. The shingles are 12" wide and have a 6" gutter between. When installed they take on a true 3D appearance just like the real ones. With a light painting of alcohol/India ink solution the shingles take on a nice aged appearance, a little more, more aging, it's all up to you. Check the photo at top, half is stained the other half is not.

Shingles are laser cut from a heavy wood fiber content paper and resemble wood  or asphalt shingles very well.


You get 2 sheets that measure 4 inches wide by 12 inches long. With a 50% overlap the shingles would cover the area of a single sheet. The two sheets have approximately 90 square inches  of shingles which will cover approximately 45 square inches of area.


While these shingles are designed mainly for use on exterior walls of buildings they can also be used on the roof to give a very decorative designed touch.

 

 

 

 

Jim M: that cabin is so well done, what a piece of art it is!!!  Is that the one that has a completely modeled interior??

 

thanks - walt

 
 
 
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OGR Forum Member
 
May 4, 2012 7:49 PM

Is that the one that has a completely modeled interior??

Walt,

Thanks!  No,  that one was a model of our log home.  The one I linked was a model of a home Leslie's uncle once owned. 

 

Jim M

Check the Scenery Sourcelist first!

 

Member of the J&C Studios Archive - building a permanent archive of great O-Gauge content!

 
 
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OGR Forum Member
 
May 4, 2012 7:58 PM

Originally Posted by walt rapp:

........ but I couldn't tell what material it is.  The peel and stick comment made me think paper.  Does anyone know? 

 
 

 

thanks - walt

Walt, from your post above:

 

"Shingles are laser cut from a heavy wood fiber content paper "

 

 

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Check out the J&C Studios Archive- building a permanent archive of great O-Gauge content!

 

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OGR Forum Member
 
May 5, 2012 12:50 PM

Originally Posted by Vulcan:
Originally Posted by walt rapp:

Walt, from your post above:

 

"Shingles are laser cut from a heavy wood fiber content paper "

 

 Thanks Vulcan: I can't believe I didn't see that!!!  I had to have read the thing 5 times to boot!!!!!!!

 

Pretty, no, VERY embarrassing!

 

Wonder if it could be painted?  I do see the comment about weathering them, but changing color is a whole different ballgame.

 

- walt

 
 
 
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OGR Forum Member
 
May 5, 2012 3:22 PM

Happens to the best of us, Walt.

 

 

I paint cardstock and printer paper all the time, I'm sure the shingles could be painted as well.

 

________________________________________________________

 

Check out the J&C Studios Archive- building a permanent archive of great O-Gauge content!

 

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OGR Forum Member
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May 6, 2012 8:56 AM

Walt,

 

These are Bar Mills laser cut wood.  And a little crooked.

 

Dave

 

Scratch

 

 

 

Mercer Junction

724.662.1110

www.mercerjunction.com

 
 
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OGR Forum Member
 
May 6, 2012 2:08 PM

Dave, thanks for showing the image.  In a pinch they might pass as dimensional shingles.

 

Vulcan: thanks for letting me know that the stuff from Rusty Stumps should be able to be painted!  That looks like for now that using them is MY ONLY option if I insist on a pure dimensional shingle look.

 

Before I sign off this reply, may I ask again: has anyone seen IN PERSON the PLASTIC cedar shingle sheets that I originally showed above to let me know if they might pass as dimensional shingles in a pinch. 

 

I don't know if I like wood stuff.  I know how to make plastic sheets come out OK but I've never worked with wood.  I do NOT want them to look like wood.

 

- walt

 
 
 
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OGR Forum Member
 
May 7, 2012 11:00 AM

Thanks KD!!  The Shake style looks promising if Rusty Stumps doesn't work out or if no one comes up with a plastic dimensional source.

 

- walt

 
 
 
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OGR Forum Member
 
May 8, 2012 6:28 PM

This may be a little off topic but it does deal with roofing shingles. When using the plastruct 3 tab shingles, how do most of you finish off the peak of the roof where the sheets meet or where you have a seam on a hip style roof.

Thanks,

Dan Z

 
 
 
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OGR Forum Member
 
May 9, 2012 10:50 AM

DanZ: what I've done is to cut a strip 1 shingle wide the full length of the shingle sheet.  Pre-bend it length-wise in the middle and then use that as the roof cap.  Sure, in a real situation the shingles should overlap, which won't be the case here, but it looks good to me.  It needs looked at very closely to notice.

 

Here are 2 pictures that hopefully shows what I'm talking about:

 

 

- walt

D0 roof ridge shingles in place

 

D0 Roof Ridge Vent from top_2

 
 
 
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OGR Forum Member
 
May 9, 2012 3:50 PM

Looks good to me, Walt. It's called a ridge cap, for those who care.

 

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Check out the J&C Studios Archive- building a permanent archive of great O-Gauge content!

 

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OGR Forum Member
 
May 9, 2012 8:55 PM

Walt,

I'm going to give that a try.

Thanks,

Dan Z.

 
 
 
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mwb offline
OGR Forum Member
 
May 9, 2012 9:05 PM

Walt,

 

What do you use for the flashing in the valleys where the roof sections meet up?

 

No, no, no....  You obviously have not been paying attention to what I'm about to tell you...

 
 
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OGR Forum Member
 
May 10, 2012 10:53 AM

mwb: luckily so far none of the houses that I've modeled have them - or at least they are not visible.  That would be an interesting one!!!!

 

- walt

 
 
 
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mwb offline
OGR Forum Member
 
May 10, 2012 7:21 PM

Originally Posted by walt rapp:

mwb: luckily so far none of the houses that I've modeled have them - or at least they are not visible.  That would be an interesting one!!!!

 

- walt

They almost have to be there, but are probably just not visible, so they are then nothing to be bothered about as well.

 

No, no, no....  You obviously have not been paying attention to what I'm about to tell you...

 
 
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OGR Forum Member
 
May 11, 2012 11:28 AM

Maybe it's under the shingling????

 

Here are 2 pictures of the most recent house that I modeled.  I don't see any in either of the pictures.

 

 

Leighanne 4

 

 

back sliding door corner 1

 
 
 
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OGR Forum Member
 
May 11, 2012 7:37 PM

What do you use for the flashing in the valleys where the roof sections meet up?

 

They almost have to be there, but are probably just not visible, so they are then nothing to be bothered about as well.

 

 

 

 

No, there are many ways to do a shingle roof without using metal flashing in the valley.  It was once very common to use copper flashing in the valley but I don't see it used very often anymore.  The easiest way is to have the shingle row extend across the valley and then a chalk line is snapped down the valley.  The shingle from the opposing roof-line are cut to end at the chalk line.  When these shingles are applied, roof cement is used under the shingle by the chalkline to help hold it down.   The end result is what you see from Walt's picture.

 

Jim M

Check the Scenery Sourcelist first!

 

Member of the J&C Studios Archive - building a permanent archive of great O-Gauge content!

 
 
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