Skip to main content

Reply to "Norfolk Southern engine catches fire outside of Pittsburgh."

@CSXJOE posted:

Could this have been the results of turbocharger run a way?

All we can do is guess.  This was a rather large engine room fire, top and bottom.

Every now and then, a GE unit will roll past, and it has some evidence of having had a small engine room fire.  As Hudson5432 pointed out, that is usually due to a maintenance failure.  Usually it is from a high pressure fuel line failing and spraying a stream of fuel -- not  a large stream -- onto the exhaust manifold.  Usually, when the fuel pump circuit breaker is manually opened, shutting down the fuel pump, the fire either burns itself out, or a fire department comes out and extinguishes it.  

The fact that one of these locomotives with scorched paint on the upper parts of the hood is occasionally seen, does not mean that these fires are common.  Usually the only damage (other than replacing the failed component and cleaning the diesel engine) is cosmetic, and is rarely repainted until heavy maintenance is due on that locomotive.

No armored high pressure solid or flexible line lasts forever.

Last edited by Number 90
OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

www.ogaugerr.com
×
×
×
×
×