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Reply to "Williams 4000 Hudson (cab 5405) Does this have a smoke unit?"

The motors in most of the Williams motors from this period are early Hong Kong Mabuchi motors look for the stylized M on the plastic end.  These motors should have never been used in a model train as they have a static resistance of about .8 ohms it is not the quality of the motor that is in question it is the armature winding. The stall current of this motor at 12v is   "15A" and "25A" at 20v WoW.  Kiss your eUnit or TMCC driver board goodbye.  If you are trying to run one of these TMCC one stall and you are going to wipe out your motor driver board. I am guessing that cost was the governing factor. Mabuchi makes this motor by the millions Half the cordless drills in the world use this motor.  I would not doubt that they bought up a bunch of mfg. overruns.  Just a wild aaa guess this 30,000 rpm motor forced the decision to use the ridiculous 42:1 gearbox.  Cost cutting run amuck.   Other things which make you go Hmmmmm I wish others would count the turns on their Williams locos I am wondering if what I have observed is correct.  At one time or another I have owned over twenty Williams locos and did count the turns on every one of them and as far as I can tell they used two gearboxes  The infamous 42:1 and a 21:1.  The irony here is that all the locos which should have  a high top speed had the 42:1 box and the models of slower prototype locos such as the PRR B6 switcher and the Camelback have the 21:1 box. I am down to four Williams Steamers the PRR B6  0-6-0,  Camelback 4-6-0,  PRR L1s 2-8-2  and a N&W J 4-8-4.  The first three have the 21:1 gearing and the N&W  J has 42:1 gearing.  I think we could all live with the 42:1 box in the first three locos but the  "J" ?   21:1 would be just about perfect in the  J and  42:1 would not be bad in the 0-6-0 a loco which spent ninety percent of it's life under thirty miles per hour.  Now if this is not enough to fry your brain forget the Williams flywheel they have a .128 hole in the center and the motor shaft is .125 that three thousandths out of concentric is responsible for the crazy vibration that is amplified in the thin brass body shell.  The D shaft on the motor even makes it worse you can see a pronounced flywheel wobble at low speeds I have shimmed them with .001" shim brass and it helps but they still wobble.  A flywheel which runs true is half the cure and a motor with about 2 ohms static resistance would be the other half. Certainly no lower than 1.7 ohms which the Mabuchi 545 that I am using is. I have 3A polyfuse inline with the motor driving with TMCC motor drivers. Most TMCC driver boards are capable of 15V or close and a stall would be almost 9A which is cutting it more than close however that is much better than the 18.7A stall at 15V which the original motor would pull at stall.    What ever you do the original motor has to go .  You could opt for a $40 Pittman or a $9 mabuchi depends on how much you love the locomotive.         Drummer, as for the smoke unit all the Williams steamers came with a Seuthe smoke unit I don't think much of them. Cramming a cigarette down the stack would be more effective.  I think Williams was out of the brass business by the time the fan smoke units were designed.                                             j          

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