Tagged With "design"

Topic

Best Free Track Planning Software

Austin G. ·
I want to get a track planning software to help design my new layout.  I dont really want to buy a software because I'd use it so little so I was wondering what you guys think is the best free software? Also i'd like to use Atlas O track.Thanks
Topic

Baby got a new pair of shoes!

ChessieFan72 ·
I received some new bridge shoes for my AtlasO deck bridge. I got them from Scale City Designs, $8 a pair. They are cast metal and each shoe comes in three pieces to be assembled. I purchased the short shoes, but they also have tall shoes.
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Any thoughts/experiences re: Evan Designs cardstock & building accessories software??

ogaugeguy ·
Anyone familiar with or have experience using Evan Designs' Model Train software? They claim their Model Builder can create cardstock buildings that are scaleable and customizable. Their Advertiser, Brickyard, Grafitti, Window Designer, Stained Glass...
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Evan Designs Inkjet Decal Paper?

brianel_k-lineguy ·
I've read good things about this company doing a search on forum topics, but couldn't find anything about this decal paper for making white decals on an inkjet printer.   Here's a link for the product and for an article that led me to find this:...
Topic

How to Draw a Scale Layout Design?

ES44AC ·
In designing track plans for a hopeful future layout, I've found scale drawings to be important in making the design accurate. I've tried to make scale drawings with ruler, say 1/2 inch = 1 foot on blank white paper, but that doesn't seem right. Most track plans I've seen are drawn on graph paper with one or four boxes representing a square foot. What am I doing wrong?
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Re: New Layout Plans

DoubleDAZ ·
In the first example, after you run over the elevated section in either direction the first time, you can't run over it again without backing through it.
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Re: New Layout Plans

KIKEEHN ·
Thanks Dave, I never saw that. I doubt if I'll go with that plan though . I actually prefer #2, than #4 and finally the last is #3. Thanks for the input, mayby I'll take another look at #1 and see what I can do. Didn't mention the layout planned is 6 1/2 X 10.
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Re: How to Draw a Scale Layout Design?

Nicks Trains ·
Why don't you use SCARM? It's free, just search for it, download it, and plan away.
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Re: How to Draw a Scale Layout Design?

ToledoEd ·
The software RRTracks v5.0 has a 6" grid. Hope this helps.
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Re: How to Draw a Scale Layout Design?

Phoebe Snow Route ·
I agree that using track planning software is probably the best way to go. As a child I used to scratch out some track plans using pencil and paper before constructing my carpet layouts. As an adult, I now use SCARM and couldn’t be happier with it. Like Nicks Trains said it’s free and easy to use.
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Re: How to Draw a Scale Layout Design?

Moonman ·
The scale that you use depends on the size of the paper to fit the room and the layout on to it. Then you need a template for the curve radii that you plan to use to match that scale. What is not turning out for you? The room should be a simple exercise of converting it to your scale. Are you averse to using layout design software?
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Re: How to Draw a Scale Layout Design?

CAPPilot ·
Michael, Go with track planning software. Its easy to do slight variations to the plan without losing the original. I must have hundreds of saved files for my current layout build, each one having a slight change to see what happens to the overall design. If I didn't like the change to the plan then I would go back to the previous saved version to try something else. If after doing many changes to get something I wanted but it didn't work out, I would go back many versions and start over...
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Re: How to Draw a Scale Layout Design?

Ace ·
Years ago when I drew track plans on paper, I generally used a scale of 3/4" = 1 foot, so 1/16" = 1 inch for convenience. Now I use SCARM because it makes easy work of track and turnout geometry, its relatively fast fun and easy, and has great 3-D imaging to plan scenery. SCARM has extensive track libraries for different brands of track, and you can do custom-spec flex-track arrangements. It's free software, you can't beat that!
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Re: How to Draw a Scale Layout Design?

ES44AC ·
Thanks for all the feedback! I will download SCARM when I return home from school.
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Re: How to Draw a Scale Layout Design?

DoubleDAZ ·
Michael, there's plenty of help here and there are a lot of tutorials available for how to do things in SCARM. it may take a bit to get the hang of using software for design, but it's well worth it in the long run. And free is always good.
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Re: How to Draw a Scale Layout Design?

Carey TeaRose ·
I am very old school (cuz' I'm old!, and my Dad was a mechanical engineer, too), and I like putting pencil to paper! I actually enjoy hand drawing and counting the little squares- using four squares equals one foot, one square equals three inches. So I do use graph paper. I tape pieces together to make it big enough. I add colored marker pens to emphasize certain things.
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Re: How to Draw a Scale Layout Design?

Dennis ·
I don't know if Scarm was around when I started designing my layout. I used (use) RRTrack software. It is excellent. Dennis
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Re: How to Draw a Scale Layout Design?

DoubleDAZ ·
I also use v5 of RR-Track because SCARM didn't come out until after I started back in the hobby. I then convert my designs to SCARM for the different 3D view. They both have their pros and cons, but SCARM is still free, so that's a bonus.
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Re: How to Draw a Scale Layout Design?

Carey TeaRose ·
I downloaded it, (at least I thought I did)- but all that is new in my applications is Friendlysocket and Pronto file folder. Obviously not good.
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Re: How to Draw a Scale Layout Design?

PRR1950 ·
Carey, I have attached what you should have downloaded from SCARM. The SCARM author, Mixy, allows advertisements on his webpage to fund his efforts, and, often, those advertisers use somewhat deceptive practices or placements to get you to download their product. Use what you see below. Chuck
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Re: How to Draw a Scale Layout Design?

Carey TeaRose ·
wah... I did download your link, but when i tried to open it it said, "Safari can’t open the file “SCARM Setup v0.9.31.exe” because no available application can open it."
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Re: How to Draw a Scale Layout Design?

crood58 ·
I agree with everyone in using a computer program, just like we do in real life for buildings, bridges, roads, and everything else. If you are curious about drawing scales. Lookup architectural scale online. This will explain the method and madness behind 3/4" = 1'-0" or whatever scale you want. This may help you if you print your drawings to scale and need to measure something if you didn't dimension. Chris
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Re: How to Draw a Scale Layout Design?

DoubleDAZ ·
This is the official website. Don't forget, SCARM doesn't work on a MAC unless you're runnig Windows. http://www.scarm.info/index.php
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Re: How to Draw a Scale Layout Design?

Dan Padova ·
I did get it to work on my MAC. But I'm sticking with paper and pencil. The computer is just too cumbersome to make track diagrams with.
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Re: How to Draw a Scale Layout Design?

Ace ·
I used to think it was too cumbersome to set up the mouse driver on a 286 computer. What would I need a mouse for?
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Re: How to Draw a Scale Layout Design?

PRR1950 ·
Carey, Safari is a browser and should not have been trying to open the SCARM program. If you downloaded the SCARM program on to an Apple product, as Dave noted above, it will not work unless you first obtain a Windows emulator program. On the other hand, if you downloaded it to a Windows operated machine, simply find the download file on your drive and double click on it. SCARM will then install. Chuck
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Re: How to Draw a Scale Layout Design?

ezmike ·
I used RR-Tracks to draw my layout. Once you get the hang of it it's fun and easy. It's pc based so if you gave a Mac you must be willing to use a virtual Windows, or whatever it's called, platform. Never tried SCRAM but I did use pencil and graph paper with a CTT Track Template made of plastic that had scale outlines of the common Lionel track. That was fun too, taping enough sheets of paper together to represent your space, tracing, erasing, tracing dome more... Mike
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Re: Lionel Post War Quality

Bluegill1 ·
Look at some of those Postwar accesories, simple, basic, yet undeniably absolutely fascinating. And for the most part are very reliable and easy to fix and maintain. Can't say that about modern accessories , (or trains). Postwar trains and accessories are a joy to work on.
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Re: Lionel Post War Quality

aussteve ·
Products in the postwar era and before were built to last. It was expected. I doubt that postwar Lionel was building trains to satisfy a huge collector's market. They were toys and not cheap at that. They were often handed down or kept as keepsakes. So good engineering and materials kept repeat customers and/or influenced word of mouth advertising for new customers. It was a necessity. During the mpc era the trains started getting marketed more to collectors than during postwar. Today, many...
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Re: Lionel Post War Quality

GGG ·
No problem. Own lots of PW, but these post followed by anyone making a comment that is less than glorious become a "your bashing". The post war period went from 45 to 69. How was the quality in 1969. Innovation, absolutely. There was nothing before Lionel started making electric toy trains. The ingenuity of the mechanical, electrical use of solenoids, vibrating motors, motors, etc... was outstanding. But as time marched on, the quality fell off. Molds used over and over, manufacturing...
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Re: Lionel Post War Quality

MNCW ·
When I was a youngster in the 1960's my first Lionel trains were a plastic steamer and a plastic FA diesel. Gradually, I kept working back in time until I found what would become my favorite locomotives, prewar steam switchers. Most of mine are now 77ish years old now. Boy, do I love them, for everything everyone mentioned already, swiss watch-like craftsmanship, made in the USA, easily repaired, and they can last another 77 years, properly maintained. You can't beat all that as far as I am...
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Re: Lionel Post War Quality

OKHIKER ·
I certainly wasn't the original poster but in my opinion he certainly wasn't comparing and contrasting the relative quality of products produced by Lionel during the post-war era with the products manufactured today. He was simply stating the obvious; Lionel's engineering concepts and finished manufactured products during the post-war years were superbly made "toys". As far as I'm concerned you can throw in their pre-war production as well. There is no question when the toy train malaise hit...
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Re: Lionel Post War Quality

Dan Padova ·
I didn't want to have the debate about today's Lionel production compared to the Post-war production. It's not why I started this topic. As has been said, today's products are infinitely more reliable with all of their electronics than most 60 or 70 year old products could ever hope to be, in their time. Again, someone pointed out how automobiles are so much more reliable than those built up to and including the 1970s. My first brand new car, 1969 Olds Cutlass was ready for the graveyard at...
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Re: Lionel Post War Quality

Tommy_F ·
The quality from 1945-54 is simply phenomenal. Take apart a truck with a coil-activated coupler and look at the engineering they they put into just making the coupler open. The 165/182 cranes have what amounts to a small transmission built into them. Insane. You could make a pretty good argument that early Postwar Lionel was over-engineered, but old JL was serious about his trains being the standard of the world.
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Re: Lionel Post War Quality

bigkid ·
"If the question about today's manufactured products being of higher quality is to be debated I would concede that their electronic functions and detail could not be matched by anything produced from 1900 to 1960 but in terms of reliability, durability and ruggedness in my opinion there is no way that what is produced today can seriously match up with the old Lionel Corporation's finished product. I wish I could live long enough because I would like to debate this issue 50 years from now...
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Re: Lionel Post War Quality

Ted Bertiger ·
The postwar stuff still runs after all these years. Year after year and you virtually can get parts quite easily unlike some other newer stuff!
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Re: Lionel Post War Quality

Texas Pete ·
Egad. That really is the key thing. Nicely done! Pete
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Re: Lionel Post War Quality

GGG ·
Bigkid that is my point, but I specifically avoided electronic and modern features. Because quality is relative to the time too. Also people do confuse engineering design and quality. Folks forget how many imperfections in casting, paint, decals occurred. Or how some elaborate accessories like cattle cars, pipe loader required tinkering to get them to work right. Everything back in the 50-60 was rugged and heavy. Think appliances. But a side frame motor was not a Swiss watch by any stretch.
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Re: Lionel Post War Quality

bigkid ·
@ggg, yep, exactly. I was thinking about this discussion this morning, and constantly when talking about modern trains I get all kinds of discussions about how poorly consumer products are made (which is true), we are in a throw away society and so forth, and while that is true, I think it has fogged things up even more. We have become a throw away society because the manufacturers made a conscious decision to make products that don't last, the obsession with price became everything. Sure,...
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Re: Lionel Post War Quality

Texas Pete ·
Wasn't it in the fifties that the phrase "Never buy a car made on a Monday or a Friday" turned up? So much for fondly remembered US made quality. What about "planned obsolescence?" Oy. Many of us tend to see the past through rose colored glasses. "The older I get the better I was." But it ain't necessarily so. I can never be a kid again but I can at least pretend to be one. My trains are strictly nostalgia items, nothing more, nothing less. I even run my HO and N on conventional DC. However,...
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Re: Lionel Post War Quality

SAL9000 ·
I would strongly argue that postwar incarnation of Lionel had no intention of having their stuff last for decades and decades. It wasn't about quality or pride or workmanship, it was about the design and manufacturing methods of the times and the byproduct was stuff that lasted for decades and decades. This can be seen in other industries of the era, such as firearms. If Lionel had access to cheap DC motors, cheap electronics and cheap/modern tooling design, they most certainly would have...
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Re: Lionel Post War Quality

jim pastorius ·
For that time period, Lionel was not the low price toy train maker. They were more to the top end. If you look at their trains and accessories and put them in the context of that period their products were well thought out and designed. For them and others, die casting was a big step up as was their use of Bakelite.
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Re: Lionel Post War Quality

Dan Padova ·
Many years ago, I had a couple of late forties locomotives. A 675, a single motor GG1 and an early turbine. They all had Nickel, I believe, rims on the drive wheels. The first thing I noticed was how quietly they ran compared to my mane-traction equipped locomotives.
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Re: Lionel Post War Quality

ajzend ·
I'm sure that they would be quieter, especially if they had been vibrator motor driven. Alan
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Re: Lionel Post War Quality

ajzend ·
I've picked up various Marx cars and engine over the years. I've always been amazed at how dependable these "cheap" trains have been. With a little oil and lube they always run great. Alan
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Re: Lionel Post War Quality

TeleDoc ·
Referring to the 022 switches, the original switches were patented April 21, 1925 under Patent #1534303, by J.L. Cowen himself. After WW 2, they were redesigned with improvements. They stand the test of time!!!
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Re: Lionel Post War Quality

ADCX Rob ·
You hit the nail on the head - the MagneTraction locos used aluminum parallel plate motor construction and were looser & noisier than their non-MagneTraction predecessor equivalents.
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Re: Lionel Post War Quality

Trussman ·
I have several post war engines, mostly all the 20 series steam engines and few doubles. When I'd get one, I pull the shell off, go over the wiring, clean the commutator, clean the brushes, oil the axles, and also put a drop of oil on the center of the drive gears, grease wheel gears. All of these engines run smooth and sweet. When a friend comes over to see my trains, I'll hand them a steam engine to hold and feel how hefty they are. I'd say, just think these were toys.
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Re: Lionel Post War Quality

Rusty Traque ·
Postwar trains are also far simpler in construction and details. A 2055 has what, 5-6 parts total for the boiler? If there was command control and sound back in them days, folks would be complaining about having to change vacuum tubes, frayed cloth wiring and repairing solder connections to the tube sockets. Rusty
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Re: Lionel Post War Quality

C W Burfle ·
Postwar trains are also far simpler in construction and details. A 2055 has what, 5-6 parts total for the boiler? I'd guess that 99 percent of the people who purchased or received a 2055 as a gift were absolutely delighted to have it. I've owned a number of them, and repaired more. I've seen ones that were babied, and ones that were abused and poorly stored. Just about all of them were easily brought back to life. I rescued an entire train set, lead by a 736 and a 2056 that was submerged in...
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