Tagged With "Homemade"

Topic

Homemade track cleaning car

Pete in Kansas ·
I had a piece of plate steel laying on my workbench that just happened to be about the right size to make a standard gauge car, I also has a couple of trucks Some old decals and a piece of a vinyl trim board that I used to fix my front porch. I put them together and it makes a track cleaning car that actually works. The abrasive pad I stole from the kitchen sink and attached it with a rubber band. The only things i bought for this masterpiece? of home engineering were the couplers, screws...
Topic

Tinplate Buildings

waynew ·
Hello to Everyone; If anyone has time to post pictures of homemade or restored buildings suitable for tinplate layouts in both O and Standard gauge, I would love to see them. Looking for ideas. thanks. waynew. ( wayne walter)
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

Arne ·
I have made a house for 0 gauge. The tin was a old solvent canister. The Märklin Villa in 00 gauge was my template. I had changed them to 0 gauge. best greetings from Germany Arne
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

Allegheny ·
ARNE, What a great job! I really like this project. Approximately how many hours did you put into it total? HandyAndy, Your project looks exactly like a tin building!! I still can't believe it's mounted onto cardstock! Please email me as well. Thanks
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

Arne ·
Kazar, the working time was around 10 hours, but the total was 1 week to dry the colours. Arne
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

jim pastorius ·
About a year ago I walked in to my favorite antique store and he had just taken in a heavy tin building that looked like a haunted house. It was approximately O gauge so I bought it for $5. I painted two roofs a dark red for a little color. It was built to old a lit candle so there is an opening in the roof which I have never filled in. It is an unusual, cool building especially considering he price. I will post a photo soon. Keep your eyes open-never know what you will find !!
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

El Classico ·
Another source of the card stock buildings that could be attached to tin: https://ogrforum.ogaugerr.com/t...63#57038617448516563
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

navy.seal ·
A few years back I purchased a few homemade tinplate buildings at York. The designer/builder had used a computer to design and cut the pieces from steel plate which he spot welded together, primed and painted, added wiring and lights, and final glued on some Grant-Line window frames to the structures. I subsequently added some custom printed magnets to turn the buildings into the specific Milwaukee factory buildings I wanted. Bob Nelson
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

Allegheny ·
Navy Seal, you have some really nice buildings there. That's what I miss about not being able to attend York, having the chance to find someone like that there who's made some unique items for sale. For me that's what York is about, (aside having fun looking at all the trains and going with friends). ARNE, Thanks for the reply. I would have guessed much longer. There is a lot of work that went into that building. The construction of the roof with the gables must have been a real challenge to...
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

Greg J. Turinetti ·
I have some buildings from the same designer that Bob (Navy Seal) does. This is a similar building to Bob's brewery. It was my understanding the the person who made these actually cast all of the windows and doors himself. I believe that some of the buildings I have may be one of a kind. There were several other buildings that he had that I wish I had purchased. I have always been happy with the way they look and the character that they give to the Blueboard Central Division of American...
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

Steve "Papa" Eastman ·
I have 3-4 of his buildings also. His first name was Chad, but don't remember his last name. Yes he did his own castings. His bases are made of pretty heavy steel. I bought one of his first on e-bay and contacted him and convinced him to add the holes for lighting, Steve
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

Chris Lonero ·
Now this is a building I would love to have. A tinplate brewery I would open up some real estate for!
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

Greg J. Turinetti ·
I actually altered mine. I replaced the water tower with a vintage Ives water tower and it has become the Ives Railway Line manufacturing plant on my railroad. Its the major competitor to American Flyer Lines in town. Greg Northwoods Flyer
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

rdg_fan ·
Is the maker of the tinplate buildings still in business? I don't recall seeing any during the past York Show. Does anyone have any contact information? Thanks!
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

El Classico ·
HandayAndy, you should shoot me an email. I'm a little interested in some of the tech aspects of how you made that station (and MIGHT have a small idea.... )
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

Rob English ·
RDG Fan, He unfortunately is not producing any longer.
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

Robert Coniglio ·
neat looking buildings - Bob C.
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

Chris Lonero ·
I'm thinking about building something like this. I have a Marx military training building I think I can use for the main structure. Anyone have any small tinplate buildings they want to sell? Thanks.
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

Ace ·
Nice work guys! Is there a good simple cheap way to punch out clean square window openings in sheet metal?
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

Arne ·
I drill a hole and take a nibbling tool. Arne
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

navy.seal ·
Chris, If you have been to Trainfest 2014 or 2015 you may have seen the Schlitz brewery building in action on the SGMA layout as well as the 3-story building converted into a Pabst brewery building. This was done by adding a flashing Miller Engineering sign to the building's roof. That sign is virtually identical to the real one below which was erected in Chicago during the 1940s. Here's the Miller Engineering sign for comparison. My goal is to add a Miller Beer Brewery and a Blatz Beer...
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

navy.seal ·
I dug out the other buildings and took photos of them. Here's one of the buildings on a green "grass" platform which I plan to use as a little red schoolhouse until I find a better building to use: Here's another building of a similar design but with a different paint scheme and a different design for the "wing". Here's a small factory building of the same design as the yellow house but on a grey "concrete" platform and with an industrial chimney along the full far side of the building and...
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

Pete in Kansas ·
Below is a picture of my tin house that started out as a Christmas candle light. This stands about 11 inches tall and originally was bare tin. The back is hinged to place a candle inside. I bought it on Clearance after Christmas at Michaels for around $8.00. I painted it added textures that I downloaded from the internet and built the senic plot and porches from some scrap masonite. It looks right at home on my floor layout. I'll post a picture of it on my floor layout later.
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

Pete in Kansas ·
Here are a couple of pictures of the house on my floor layout in my messy basement.
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

navy.seal ·
Here is a train shed building I pop riveted together from a Smith Metal Works kit (SMW provides small bolts and nuts for assembly but IMHO pop rivets are quicker and cleaner). It is a simple design that could be easily duplicated from readily available sheet metal. Inside the shed you can see an extra piece of precut sheet metal, which SMW provides for those who want to build a shed open on one end only. Unfortunately, SMW is no longer in business but their kits and assembled buildings...
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Re: Homemade track cleaning car

Southwest Hiawatha ·
Looks pretty similar to the one some unknown person made for our toy train museum a while back. I rebuilt and repainted it a couple of years ago as it was in sad condition. I put Velcro on the bottom of the pressure pad. The Scotchbrite (actually a cheap substitute from the dollar store) sticks to it nicely, eliminating the need for the rubber band.
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Re: Homemade track cleaning car

Steve "Papa" Eastman ·
Similar idea for mine.
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Re: Homemade track cleaning car

MrNabisco ·
I like what you guys have done making some neat track cleaning cars. However, I do not recommend the constant use of an abrasive pad. It is too abrasive and actually damages the rails. The pad scratches the railhead, creating grooves for more dirt and grease to be trapped in. And repeated use of an abrasive pad eventually wears down the plating on top of the rails. A softer material, like cotton cloth, foam etc., would do much less damage to the rails. There has been much discussion on the...
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Re: Homemade track cleaning car

Ron045 ·
Just curious for users of either the abrasive pad or cotton cloth. Do you have problems with the pad/cloth hanging up on less than perfect rail joints? I have several sections that were cut to either make blocks or bridges. Thanks Ron
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Re: Homemade track cleaning car

mike g. ·
Great idea, Now I have to try and build one!
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Re: Homemade track cleaning car

Ron045 ·
Thanks or sharing. This is a great idea. Ron
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Re: Homemade track cleaning car

Pete in Kansas ·
I don't have any issues with the pad catching but... I have something I bet no one else does. I have a pair of stainless steel surgical pliers that are the perfect profile for crimping rails back to their rounded profile. Years ago the hospital I worked for was selling a bunch of old useless instraments for scrap. I noticed the profile on these pliers and when the bidder came to pick up the lot ( probably hundreds of pounds worth) I asked if I could have this one set of pliers. He said sure...
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

Carey TeaRose ·
Handyandy, what is this done with??
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

handyandy ·
I used a computer and Microsoft Paint to create the artwork. Then printed it onto cardstock which was then sprayed with three or four coats of clear gloss spray paint and assembled over a foam core sub structure. The base is painted plywood. It's not really tin, but it has that look.
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

riki ·
handy andy, looks great, \\ but you could of glued it to tin, maybe 22 ga, easier to cut, then its tinplate!
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

Carey TeaRose ·
Can you email me, I'd like to talk with you further about this specific project.
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

Mallard4468 ·
This is the kind of creativity I enjoy seeing. To me, it's so much better than just plopping down the same building that a thousand other people have. And on a budget that leaves money for other things, too... Well done.
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

gene maag ·
Here are 2 diner's I made from 610 passenger cars. The only difference are the end doors, the originals are not cut out. One I sold the other I added a diner sign on top and gave it to my Grandson for his Christmas layout.
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

Chris Lonero ·
2 more diners! This is a passenger car my older brother who is no longer with us gave me years ago. I made it into a diner and named it in his honor. Below that is another diner I made from my first standard gauge passenger car
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

Steve "Papa" Eastman ·
Here is a Diner I picked up a few years ago. It looks exactly like those shown in CTT years ago as being made by Madison Hardware. Steve
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

Jim O'C ·
You should definitely check out Jayline, Skyline and H&H for O-gauge tin buildings. Ives, Hafner and Chein also made tin stations. German manufacturers Beckh, Bing, Fandor. British Hornby. Tin accessories from Schrey, Colber, Junior Bridge Company and Fergusson. All period-close enough-type stuff.
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

Former Member ·
This was a rusty Lionel 115 station I repainted in gray to be the local bank (the bankers are clones): Gene, I bought this custom-made diner a few years ago, it is Standard Gauge, looks like made from a 337 car. I added the signs – the attachment of the roof sign is temporary, gotta find a better way. This wouldn't happen to be one you made, would it?
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

El Classico ·
Sure looks like it, at any rate.
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

Greg Nagy ·
All these diners... I can almost hear Rick Sebak talking about Joe Bagadonutz sitting in the same booth daily for the past 15 years, eating pie served to him by Irene Slabodnitz, whos great grandfather bought and opened the place in 1925.
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

waynew ·
Hello Gene Magg, Chris Lonero, Hojack, Steve Eastman and anyone else I may have left out. Thanks for posting your pictures of your diners. Its difficult finding tinplate up here (Ontario,Canada). Hope to find a junker when I'm at York. I have to try making one. Thanks, waynew
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

Steamer ·
one of my favorite shows.
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Re: Tinplate Buildings

handyandy ·
Here's my homemade whistling station. It's styled after vintage Ives stations with an AF whistle unit inside.
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Re: Great Starter and Small 027 Layout Track Plan with Lots of Switching and Action

Rescued Trains ·
Charlie, I like the whole layout. Toy trains at their best. Steve
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Re: Great Starter and Small 027 Layout Track Plan with Lots of Switching and Action

das boot ·
Another great example of combining family, Christmas, and trains, I will second "toy trains at their best." Your layout is easy to understand, really like your turntable and the ease of construction and maintenance, "two thumbs up."
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Re: Great Starter and Small 027 Layout Track Plan with Lots of Switching and Action

Dan Padova ·
Great info on building a turntable. Thanks for sharing.
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