Tagged With "Germany"

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Re: Rendsburg Loop - Germany

Rusty Traque ·
Then there's the spiral tunnels in Canada: Rusty
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Re: Rendsburg Loop - Germany

Firewood ·
There are certainly several ingenious solutions, especially in places like Switzerland. The Gotthard spiral tunnels are one example, and this one that looks like a layout , the Bernina loop.
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Re: Rendsburg Loop - Germany

Allegheny ·
Firewood, For some reason your response isn't showing the image "image not found".
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Re: Rendsburg Loop - Germany

TomlinsonRunRR ·
Here's a YouTube video. Check out around 1:23. Take that Horseshoe Curve! TRRR
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Re: Rendsburg Loop - Germany

Miketg ·
I spent a year in Kiel, Germany in the early 90's and went to Rendsburg often. Rendsburg is a very pretty town and that ride around the loop is great. There is also a pedestrian tunnel under the canal and a unique hanging bridge that carries car across the canal. All the best, Miketg
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Re: Rendsburg Loop - Germany

Firewood ·
Re: Rendsburg Loop - Germany
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Re: Rendsburg Loop - Germany

Allegheny ·
Firewood, Yes it did! Thanks
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Re: Rendsburg Loop - Germany

Ace ·
Very interesting. Rendsburg is north of Hamburg, west of Kiel (on the Kiel Canal) and just south of Denmark. My version of the Bernina Loop with 8% grade.
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Re: Rendsburg Loop - Germany

Miketg ·
And both Danish and German influences over the centuries. Miketg
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Rendsburg Loop - Germany

TomlinsonRunRR ·
I just stumbled on this Rendsburg Loop when researching shunting puzzles (of which it is not). The engineering solution connecting a low-level train station with a high railroad bridge reminds me of a single spiral helix. Looking at the map of the town in the link, and assuming some kind of emiment domain, makes me wonder what the townspeople thought when the engineers started building this thing! Tomlinson Run Railroad
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Countries that Produced Trains Before the Second World War?

CountOrlock ·
Besides the US and Germany, I know Great Britain had companies that produced toy trains. Were there other countries that did so? I believe the dies for Lionel trains were produced in Italy for a while. If there were such trains, I wonder if they show up in US markets? Are there basic differences between, say, an American toy train and a German toy train--did they all use the same basic motor and other hardware design principles, and manufacturing materials and techniques? I would assume so,...
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Re: Countries that Produced Trains Before the Second World War?

sncf231e ·
Yes, there were many more countries were trains were made; have a look at this list: http://www.tcawestern.org/manufacturers.htm And I can recommend the book by Pierce Carlson if you want more answers: https://www.amazon.com/Toy-Tra...arlson/dp/0060156147 I do not know which of these trains show up on American markets; you are closer to that than I am. Note that the beginning of standardization of toy-trains was done in Germany by Märklin. Regards Fred
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Re: Countries that Produced Trains Before the Second World War?

Rob English ·
They were produced all over.... Russia, Spain, France, England, Germany, Italy, USA, Japan, Austria, and I believe Brasil (?) or somewhere in Latin America... The design asthetic is quite different from country to country but the motor concept (universal serial wound, 3 pole, electromagnetic field, etc) was generally similar. Most prewar was stamped tin plated steel that was painted or lithographed. There were other methods of construction (wood turnings, cast iron, die casting etc) . These...
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Re: Countries that Produced Trains Before the Second World War?

Carey Williams ·
Many German companies imported toy trains in to America in the 1900-1915 era .... Bing set up their own showroom in 1911 (NYC) ...and offered their trains with American road names ... till WW1 shut down the imports ....American manufactures were thrilled to have the whole market to themselves sans competition...till the early 20's when German imports returned ..but never to the degree they had prior to WW1 I would not believe that whole tale about Lionel having the tooling made for the 700E...
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Re: Countries that Produced Trains Before the Second World War?

Tinplate Art ·
Yet it seems quite plausible that Mario Caruso could have had the right connections in Naples for setting up La Precisa. Revisionist history is tenuous at best.
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Re: Countries that Produced Trains Before the Second World War?

sncf231e ·
There is and was quite some small metal industries in Italy, however this is and was all concentrated in the norther region (Milan, Turin) and certainly not in Naples. I do not think you could find even a lathe in Naples then (and now). Regards Fred
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Re: Countries that Produced Trains Before the Second World War?

Dennis Holler ·
The La Precisa connection is one I've seen documented well in about everything I've ready about Lionel history. If I am not mistaken Caruso was with Cowen for years, and they probably made a lot of their sheet metal stamping dies there long before the need for die casting dies etc. Labor was cheaper there then as it is in China now. Same Principle.
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Re: Countries that Produced Trains Before the Second World War?

Jim O'C ·
Funny, Marx's influence was just the opposite, starting here in the US and then branching outward to Britain, Mexico and Japan. At last count, I have seen 27 different pressings for the Marx Superchief/Lumar Lines friction floor train from as far away as India. Walt Hiteshew's photo
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Yet another reason to develop a low-floor power truck (a floor-toy DMU)

RailRide ·
Dickie Toys, maker of the City Liner floor-toy tram has come out with another rail-transit toy, this time a diesel-MU car: From a bunch of YouTube and Google Images searches, I've narrowed this one down to being a model of an Alstom Coradia LINT 27 diesel multiple unit car. This particular toy recreates the car as used by Deutsche Bahn, who calls it a Class 640. (there is an articulated variant known as a 'LINT 41' whose prototype is currently in use on Ottawa's O-Train Trillium Line) Yes,...
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Re: Yet another reason to develop a low-floor power truck (a floor-toy DMU)

Miketg ·
Hi Railride. Some of the 0 scalers in Germany have already motorized these and have even cut them up and lengthed them to make them more protptipcal. I even believe some has made up a drive unit for these too. Miketg
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Re: Yet another reason to develop a low-floor power truck (a floor-toy DMU)

RailRide ·
Well, I imagine the German modelers managed to craft 2-rail finescale power trucks somewhere. Three-rail trucks would be magical. In my hypothetical empire, light-rail/trolley routes would have a physical connection to the rest of the layout somewhere, so I'd have to have some means of 3R traction (I could cobble together an assembly for non-powered bogies), to warrant pursuing the acquisition of some of these cars for the purposes of effecting a powered conversion. Especially the newest...
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Re: Yet another reason to develop a low-floor power truck (a floor-toy DMU)

colorado hirailer ·
I have long wanted a three rail below floor power truck, with adjustable wheelbase, and interchangeable sideframes, needed for an assortment of gas electrics, railbuses, and even geared locomotives. That ain't rocket science....somebody tool this up!
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Re: Yet another reason to develop a low-floor power truck (a floor-toy DMU)

Ted S ·
I believe a company called Northwest Short Line (NWSL) makes, or used to make a motorized truck called the "magic carpet" drive for these applications. And there was another one too, called (I think) the Black Beetle. These are meant for trolley/transit not pulling long consists. Google around and see what you come up with.
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Re: Yet another reason to develop a low-floor power truck (a floor-toy DMU)

colorado hirailer ·
I approached NWSL years ago, and got sneered at for wanting it for three rail applications.
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Re: Yet another reason to develop a low-floor power truck (a floor-toy DMU)

RailRide ·
The Black Beetle is only available with finescale wheelsets. They do have an O-Gauge version for PCC's, so I guess that's a start. The problem I see is that nobody seems to believe 3-railers would ever undertake such conversion projects. NWSL does have 3R-style wheelsets in their catalog: They also have the wheelsets unassembled...which would be handy for adding gears to them...if you have the proper tools for that.--since NWSL doesn't offer geared 3-rail wheelsets. But I didn't research...
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Re: Yet another reason to develop a low-floor power truck (a floor-toy DMU)

Adriatic ·
There is a need, I agree., Reasonably priced qualty motor gearbox kits for small low rpm applications don't seem to exist anymore in any hobby lately.(I figured RC would havs,reductions but it seems not... Or the were too wide, I forget I eyeballed so many gearboxes lol. The self contained nature of tbe present carpet units and being a 2r design might make 3 rail use harder,without external wipers to manipulate the wires off of. I imagine the overall width might even be an issue; leaving...
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Re: Yet another reason to develop a low-floor power truck (a floor-toy DMU)

mwb ·
You are correct that this is not "rocket science"; however ,it probably has not been done since those that could do it do not believe that there is adequate market numbers to support such an endeavor. Couple this with the incessant requirement that the price be "reasonable" (read "cheap") and you can pretty much assure that this will not happen any time soon. There are the Magic Carpet drives and then there are the drives from Q-car - 2-rail - not cheap and therefore grades as unreasonable.
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Re: Yet another reason to develop a low-floor power truck (a floor-toy DMU)

RailRide ·
Conversion of a Magic Carpet drive seems like a possibility--if the axles used in them are the same size as the 3R wheelsets NWSL can provide. Sideframes for these two railcars shouldn't be too much of a problem--The City Liner has shrouded trucks so the lack of sideframes isn't a problem, and the LINT DMU already has reasonably detailed sideframes as part of its dummy wheelsets, they could be cut off and mounted on a simple bracket attached to the converted motor truck. I briefly thought...
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Re: Yet another reason to develop a low-floor power truck (a floor-toy DMU)

Former Member ·
My 3rd Rail RDC has a 3 Rail magic carpet drive
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Re: Trains and Models to see in Germany

FireOne ·
Thanks Marty, got that one on my list, I hear its really impressive. Chris Sheldon
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Trains and Models to see in Germany

FireOne ·
Heading to Berlin and Hamburg next month, any suggestions for trains to see, real or models? Chris Sheldon
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Re: Trains and Models to see in Germany

MartyE ·
Why of course. This is the place to go in Hamburg! Miniature Wunderland
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Restoration Estimate Inquiry

Elgaucho ·
I thought I'd get an estimate for a restoration job (in case I'm too afraid to do it myself) and I was BLOWN AWAY by the cost! (I'm not even sure of this train is worth that price "new"!) For 6-8hrs work... this engine and sections of the passenger cars would cost about USD$680-700 (essentially, a day's work) Do you agree?!! If you agree it's too much, would you recommend someone? Thanks everyone! El Gaucho (Argentine Cowboy).. but you can call me Ariel
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Re: Restoration Estimate Inquiry

Bossman284 ·
Too many variables to answer your question. First off it may be 8 hours of work, but it will be many days, because there needs to be time between the restoration steps. The next thing I would need to know is what will be the finished product? Is he just cleaning and removing the rust? Or is he repainting everything to make it look brand new? I would imagine the gold trimmed boxed on the passenger cars them selves would take a long time by itself. Any finally, I'd need to know who is doing...
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Re: Restoration Estimate Inquiry

Elgaucho ·
Thanks for the reply Bossman. It's a removing rust-job. No repaint. I'd assume he's a seasoned artist, has his own restoration shop and he sells some of his restorations. To me.. it's not worth USD$1,000 (if you count the purchase of the original.. for parts) BTW... who's this infamous "Earl Shrive"?!! Ha! Ariel
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Re: Restoration Estimate Inquiry

Bossman284 ·
If its just rust removal than I would say yest it seems to by high. "Earl Shrive" was a guy out here on the east coast that used to have auto body shops and and would paint your entire care for $99.00 It was the true epitome of "you get what you pay for" Good like with your project
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Re: Restoration Estimate Inquiry

sncf231e ·
I have a couple of this small BING's; this set in like new condition had a price (sold by a BING collector, so he knew) of about $100: And this one was just a few tens: Regards Fred
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Re: Restoration Estimate Inquiry

Elgaucho ·
Wow Fred! Beauties!! Do you know of any up for sale? I love these toy-like windups.
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Re: Need help identifying prewar German tin bridge and turntable

mjw999 ·
Thanks Arne! That is very interesting. I've got the "Complete Railroad System" minus the track, switches, watch tower and one engine. My trains are Hafner Overland Flyer.
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Re: Need help identifying prewar German tin bridge and turntable

mjw999 ·
Thank you so much! The turntable has the same logo as the bridge.
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Re: Need help identifying prewar German tin bridge and turntable

WindupGuy ·
I have a Fischer turntable like yours... unfortunately, the fish trademark symbol is partially obscured by one of the track pieces. It took a while to figure out the origin when I first got it.
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Re: Need help identifying prewar German tin bridge and turntable

Arne ·
In the USA some Heinrich Fischer parts was sold in the 30s by Montgomery Ward & Co together with American Flyer Trains. Arne
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Re: Need help identifying prewar German tin bridge and turntable

FRENCHTRAINS ·
The bridge is made by FISHER, just look here https://www.historytoy.com/toy...ges-Fischer-Heinrich No idea for your turntable, maybe a picture of the other side may help. Daniel
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Need help identifying prewar German tin bridge and turntable

mjw999 ·
Does anyone know who made this bridge and turntable? There is no manufacturer name, just the word Germany below the logo of a fish. I spent hours yesterday online trying to find some info on these and had no luck at all. Thank you.
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Re: Need help identifying prewar German tin bridge and turntable

sncf231e ·
The bridge is by Fischer (Firma Heinrich Fischer & Co, Nürnberg, Deutschland), I do not know whether the turntable has the same marking? That looks a bit like a clockwork Märklin version. Or maybe it is Distler ( https://www.historytoy.com/dis...ne-strom-drehscheibe ) Regards Fred
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Pre War Marklin O Gauge Boxed Set And Lionel 1700 Set ( 1700 set sold pending funds)

george ·
I'm thinning the herd and offering these items here tonight before I put them on eBay. First up is this Pre War Marklin O Gauge ELECTRIC set from the 1930's. It is in it's original box, (lid needs some re-inforcement) and is almost perfect. The loco is an 0-4-0, numbered 12880 on one side of the cab, on the other side of the cab is 20V, with a matching tender. There are some slight box rubs (pictured) in the paint, but it is oh so nice otherwise. It runs, forward and reverse, using a manual...
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Re: New video of tinplate action in Germany

Arthur ·
Entschuldigung, das ist ausGerzeichnet.
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New video of tinplate action in Germany

FRENCHTRAINS ·
A nice tinplate video to look at. Rolling stock is mainly from Marklin, motive power is Marklin replicas from Hehr, HGM, and some original Marklin models. Daniel
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Re: New video of tinplate action in Germany

JBuettner ·
Ausverzeichnet!
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Re: New video of tinplate action in Germany

sncf231e ·
ausgezeichnet Grüße Fred
OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

www.ogaugerr.com
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