Tagged With "Lightweight"

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Re: Passenger cars Classification or Model

Joe S ·
Curtis, I think you have a few too many categories of cars. Originally, passenger cars were modified stage coaches or other wagons, then made out of wood. Composite wood and steel (or iron) cars were next, ultimately to be succeeded by "all-steel" cars. These all steel cars are usually referred to as "heavyweights". In model form, they include the "Madisons" which is a term applied by hobbyists initially to the Bakelite cars brought out by Lionel in the 40s. One of the cars was named...
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Passenger cars Classification or Model

CurtisH ·
I was ask recently what the difference and when were they manufactured, of passenger cars. Specifically, Madison, Lightweight, Heavyweight and streamlined. I think I answered correctly but not completely. Madison were the original wooden clerestory roof passenger cars. Heavy weight were the same but included steel or cast iron. Lightweight were all steel or aluminum and streamlined is today's sleek cars. I know fluted side cars fit somewhere in here also. Now the question is how far off am...
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Re: Passenger cars Classification or Model

CurtisH ·
Ok excellent. Now I assume that Clerestory roofs are Madison's? Thanks for the description and quickness. Curtis
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Re: Passenger cars Classification or Model

KOOLjock1 ·
“Madison” cars are Lionel tooled models of clerestory roofed heavyweight steel passenger cars in common use from the teens through the end of steam. If you use the term “Madison” to refer to railroad equipment in the real world, they’ll either have no idea what you’re talking about, or they’ll laugh at you. Jon
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Re: Passenger cars Classification or Model

SPFord27 ·
To take this one step further, what should traditional heavyweight and lightweight cars measure? What should scale heavyweight and lightweight cars measure? I have a 5 pack of Norfolk and Western heavyweights that are 18" long, not much taller than a traditional boxcar, and the same width as a traditional J. They look long behind a traditional J and short and narrow behind the scale J.
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Re: Passenger cars Classification or Model

Jim R. ·
It’s fine to ask questions here, but it’s better to do a little bit of research before you try to answer a question yourself. It looks like you made some broad assumptions and then created facts and terms to match your assumptions. Much of the information you sought was readily available with the most basic web searches. For instance, it is widely known that streamlined passenger cars were introduced in the 1930s. Even a Wikipedia summary would have sufficed:...
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Re: Passenger cars Classification or Model

palallin ·
Man, you guys are being harsh to a guys who's trying to learn!
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Re: Passenger cars Classification or Model

prrhorseshoecurve ·
Well that Depends. The Atlas O Trainman cars along with the 3rd Rail brass passenger cars. Golden Gate Depot Harriman , P70, P70FAR, and Heavyweight cars are scale cars. Streamliners are 85' long so 21" are close to scale length. Streamline Baggage cars are are shorter than full length Streamliner coaches so at 18" long they are full scale cars. the PRR P54 cars are also scale and are only 64' in length and are approximately the length of Lionel "Madison coaches" K-line 21" streamliners are...
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Re: Passenger cars Classification or Model

aterry11 ·
The best source of passenger car history is 2 volume set The American Railroad Passenger Car By John H White Jr. paperbound version usually runs 25. 30 bucks and sells time to time. Its way easier to read in bed than the bulky car builders cyclopedia
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Re: Passenger cars Classification or Model

prrhorseshoecurve ·
Most Heavyweight cars should be nearly the same as streamlined passenger cars at 20-23" long-term depending on the mfg and car model. There are exceptions such as the Harriman cars, the p54 coaches, etc..
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Re: Passenger cars Classification or Model

Jim R. ·
Not intended to be harsh. I’m merely suggesting that you do the research before offering your thoughts as an answer to another person’s question, as you alluded to in your initial post. Why give anyone the wrong information before learning yourself? Second, question yourself. In your initial assumptions, you created a reality that was clearly of your own making. Why not seek answers first instead? For instance, I don’t know how the modern electronics which control our locomotives, and make...
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Re: Passenger cars Classification or Model

SURFLINER ·
palallin - you are right on & thanks for posting it. Form members help the nguy - cut the harsh stuff - remember when you were in the "learning mode!
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Re: Passenger cars Classification or Model

CurtisH ·
I did do a little research but I do hope you do NOT rely on Wikipedia. It is a data base created by anyone who wishes to contribute and there is a LOT of incorrect information on it. I have been burned by it and will never rely on it again. Yes I am aware that the classifications we are discussing are not real life but modeler world. As for my original answer to the person whom I was speaking with, what I did report was fairly accurate but added a class simply because he added and ask about...
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Re: Passenger cars Classification or Model

SPFord27 ·
So how long should the scale heavyweights be if the streamline cars are 21”? The cars I have do not have any interior, just the silhouettes. They are 17.5” long, 3.5” tall and 2.4” wide. I am assuming they are traditional and not scale.
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Re: Passenger cars Classification or Model

rattler21 ·
If anyone is interested, I have the two volume set in the FOR SALE forum. John in Lansing, ILL
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Re: Passenger cars Classification or Model

rattler21 ·
For easy reference the 60' baggage car is 15 scale inches long. John in Lansing, ILL
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Re: Passenger cars Classification or Model

Jim R. ·
Oops. Sorry, Curtis. I linked you to the length question from another post. That’s my mistake. 😫 Actually, it’s a good idea to refer someone to an expert (not necessarily me). It happens on this forum all the time, and I have done it myself. Otherwise, sorry if I offended you.
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Re: Passenger cars Classification or Model

CurtisH ·
Jim R Please reread the original post. NO WHERE did I mention LENGTH! And yes I find your answer very discouraging. Excuse me for stepping on your majesty of all knowings toes. Next time I will tell the person contact you!
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Re: Passenger cars Classification or Model

CurtisH ·
I feel maybe you should relax on new people trying to learn and maybe take some of your own advice!
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Re: New Haven Hunter Green Lightweight Cars

MELGAR ·
Tom, In "The New Haven Railroad in the McGinnis Era" by Mark J. Frattasio (2003) on page 134 is a photograph of a New Haven Pullman-Standard postwar streamlined stainless steel sheathed passenger car with fluted sides and the red-orange window band with modernized "NH" logo. Part of the caption states: "None of the New Haven's stainless steel sheathed passenger cars escaped getting the new image treatment. All of these cars got the new image colors and logo as a group during the summer of...
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Re: New Haven Hunter Green Lightweight Cars

MELGAR ·
Further clarification on the window band colors: On page 90 of "The New Haven's Streamline Passenger Fleet 1934-1953," by Geoffrey Doughty, referring to the "Postwar Pullmans," he states: "...very few made it into Amtrak Service." On pages 113 and 114, Doughty shows photos (taken in 1967 and '68) of two sleeping cars in the "Beach" series with unpainted window bands. On page 120, he states that under Penn Central "many of the postwar stainless steel cars" ... received ... "a green stripe...
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New Haven Hunter Green Lightweight Cars

Number 90 ·
I'm curious as to whether New Haven ever completed repainting the Pullman-Standard postwar lightweight passenger cars (which featured fluted stainless steel siding with a hunter green window panel and letterboards) into the McGinnis red. Are there any New Haven experts out there who would care to comment on whether any cars remained hunter green until Amtrak day? Just curious.
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Re: New Haven Hunter Green Lightweight Cars

Apples55 ·
Tom; I’m no expert, but I would suggest you post your question in the great thread on the New Haven... https://ogrforum.ogaugerr.com/...41#84776363659651941 You can find some very knowledgeable folks there.
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Re: New Haven Hunter Green Lightweight Cars

New Haven Joe ·
The book The New Haven Railroad's Streamline Passenger Fleet 1934 - 1953 by Goeffrey Doughty says on page 113 that "not all of the New Haven's stainless steel sleepers carried a green or orange band through the window portion of the car." On the same page there is a really bad photo in color of the sleeper Lookout Point. This sleeper was transferred to PC ownership in 1969. The photos shows a green Penn Central name board and what may be a green window band. On page 220 the book says "Penn...
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Re: New Haven Hunter Green Lightweight Cars

mlaughlinnyc ·
Quite different greens !! NH had a nice green. PC used what we from the NYC called "nationalization green", an ugly shade of grunge green.
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Re: New Haven Hunter Green Lightweight Cars

C.Vigs ·
All of the New Haven's lightweight cars with a window band were repainted in a very short time frame - between late spring and early fall of 1955. Because of this, pictures and film of mixed color consists are very rare. Some sleepers had bare stainless steel window bands and they remained bare. In the Penn Central era, many cars were repainted with green window bands (a different shade of green than what the New Haven used).
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Re: New Haven Hunter Green Lightweight Cars

Number 90 ·
Thanks for all the info, fellows. I have always had a soft spot for that fleet of 1948-era streamlined cars with the hunter green stripe, script Hew Haven logo, and the rounded roof ends. I have only seen the green ones in photos, as I did not get to New England until the mid-1970's. I old see that they went on a re-painting rampage after Patrick McGinnis became President, but wondered if they followed through completely. Apparently, they did.
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