Tagged With "soldered"

Topic

Working with PCBs

Loose-Caboose ·
I have acquired a TMCC BPC. Investigating the device, I found that someone in their infinite wisdom either broke or clipped the two leads where the shorting block would normally attach. Hence it is in a permanent state of "programming". If some one could resolve as to why some one would do this, it would remove some of my angst. That having been said, It was given to me gratis so "no real harm, no foul". I would like to try a repair. I have never worked directly with a real PCB only the...
Topic

Repair a hollow brass or bronze casting help

BobbyD ·
It is a hollow water tank spout, I don't have it in hand yet, that a friend asked me to paint. It is about 3/8" down to 1/4" with a tiny casting flaw hole in the spout wall and resembles this piece. Would attempting to solder make it worse? JB Weld? Afraid I won't be able to sand it. "Bondo"? It won't move after it is installed, so handling isn't an issue. I don't want to make the problem worse. Thanks!
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Re: Cleaning tubular track

mikey ·
I don't think that removing the tin plating will alter the conductivity of the track,when I solder the wire drops to the track I clean the track with a wire brush.I clean my track with Acetone on a white rag. Mikey
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Re: Cleaning tubular track

Tracker John ·
I don't see much difference in conductivity between tin coating and steel rails - you have to get a good electrical contact between the rollers and the rail. Sparking or poor engine operation would indicate a cleaning is needed. The tin plate is corrosion protection and I have not noted old and tarnished track having a problem - the key to good conductivity is a clean, corrosion-free, surface for roller and wheel contact. Since my "layout" is a collection of modules stored in a not so "cool...
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Re: Cleaning tubular track

Prewar Pappy ·
Dan, I can see nor find any printed benefit achieved from soldering wires to tube track. In many years past wires were soldered to solid hand-laid rail. In recent years most use a solid male spade connector inserted into rail from below. Of course there's the old saying,"To Each Their Own".
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Re: Cleaning tubular track

Dan Padova ·
My take on the soldering is the difference between a mechanical connection and a bonded, it's the best way I can describe it, connection. In my experience, a mechanical connection is prone to something coming between the two metals. I have learned from many years of experience having a garden railway, that if you are running track power, the rail clamps available on the market are good for keeping the rails joined, but alot of guys on the garden railway forums still complain about...
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Re: New Hakko Digital Solder Iron and FET

Mike Miller ·
Newbie to soldering and also have the Hakko FX 888D. I was soldering to Ross switches for non-derail with 63/37 rosin core solder. What's the best temperature setting to use for this purpose and for general soldering? The default setting out of the box was 750, but that seemed too hot. Should it be lower ? Mike
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Re: New Hakko Digital Solder Iron and FET

gunrunnerjohn ·
I use 650F for general soldering, when I'm soldering something fairly large, I may bump it up to 700F or even 750F. For PCB work, I drop it to 550F, and for certain delicate parts, I go down to 500F.
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Re: Tinplate tips and tricks for the frugal

MNCW ·
Hi George, Nice idea for a topic...it combines my love of tinplate/prewar steam switchers along with my love of trying to be frugal! I say "trying" because I sometimes buy basket cases and the last one needed lots of repairs which was a whole separate thread. https://ogrforum.ogaugerr.com/t...rewar-steam-switcher One of those locomotives, a #230 had some prior abuse where the headlight had a chunk missing. My friend and I used Bondo to rebuild that headlight's housing. The housing also has a...
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Re: Tinplate tips and tricks for the frugal

Steamer ·
JB helps cure several problems.
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Re: Tinplate tips and tricks for the frugal

George S ·
"cure", I see what you did there Dave.
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Re: Tinplate tips and tricks for the frugal

Steamer ·
Re: Tinplate tips and tricks for the frugal
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Re: Tinplate tips and tricks for the frugal

Tinplate Art ·
Punster!
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Re: New Hakko Digital Solder Iron and FET

David Minarik ·
Ron, You should not need any flux when doing electronics. Dave
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Re: New Hakko Digital Solder Iron and FET

cjack ·
Generally the solder brands have rosen flux inside the solder...one brand is called Multicore. And Kester... https://www.amazon.com/Kester-...JMTPC2BG7EFGRN87STFE But, sometimes the copper strands are oxidized and coating them first with a little gel flux or my choice called Sal-Met of which I bought a pint about 25 years ago and still have a third of the bottle left. When you put it on the joint, it cleans and also helps prevent oxidation of the metals when soldering.
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Re: New Hakko Digital Solder Iron and FET

gunrunnerjohn ·
I use 650F for most of my PCB work. If I'm working with a surface mounted power package like a TO-263-3 package with a large tab soldered to the PCB, sometimes I'll kick it up to 700F. Not familiar with Sal-Met, but if it's at all acid based, I'd keep it miles away from any electronic work! If you're talking about the LR024N SMT package, probably 700F.
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Re: New Hakko Digital Solder Iron and FET

cjack ·
I think it is very mildly acidic. Sal Ammoniac and lard probably. I don't use it on pcb or kits, etc. Mostly when an old copper wire or one that has oxidized badly won't tin. In 25 years I have never had a long term issue with it. It's soluble in alcohol.
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Re: New Hakko Digital Solder Iron and FET

Woodson ·
Not trying to hijack the thread, but I do have some additional questions.. My soldering 'background' is mostly automotive components which have bigger wire-18ga and larger.. Of course layout wiring also.. I recently purchased a Solomon SL-30 Digital Soldering Station, which I have yet to use, to solder ~ 28ga wire et al.... I was using Sosmetal 812620 High Strength/ Low Temp solder.. The composition of the solder is not stated.. It has a Rosin Core, and I know it has lead in it based on the...
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Re: New Hakko Digital Solder Iron and FET

gunrunnerjohn ·
The Sosmetal 812620 is standard 60/40 Rosin Core solder, should work fine. I use the 63/37 Rosin Core solder because it's an eutectic alloy that has a single temperature that it solidifies at, 60/40 has a range where it's between the liquid and solid state. This can create a cold solder joint if things are moved. The lead-free solder types are much more problematic for me, and even though I have some, I avoid using it.
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Re: New Hakko Digital Solder Iron and FET

cjack ·
It's only a pound...get it before they outlaw lead in solder. Just don't hold it with your teeth when you need an extra hand.
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Re: New Hakko Digital Solder Iron and FET

gunrunnerjohn ·
I've gone through a number of pounds of solder in the last couple of years, I try to keep several pounds in stock. I buy the 63/37 mix.
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Re: New Hakko Digital Solder Iron and FET

stan2004 ·
First off, eye protection recommended. Everyone has their favorite technique but here's what I suggest: First remove the two legs from their pads one at a time. If you have a sharp miniature diagonal cutter you can cut each leg off the FET right near the black body...then remove the legs from the pads by heating the pad for a few seconds and lifting off the amputated leg. If your cutter is not sharp you risk pulling the leg and its pad off the board when you try cutting the leg - not good.
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Re: New Hakko Digital Solder Iron and FET

Woodson ·
Talked me into it.. Just spending a bit of my daughters' inheritance.. lol
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Re: New Hakko Digital Solder Iron and FET

nvocc5 ·
Quick question for the electronic gurus. Which thickness would recommend for the 63/37 Rosin Core: 031, .015, .020. and .080 .
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Re: New Hakko Digital Solder Iron and FET

cjack ·
I'd go with the .030 or .020...maybe .020 these days.
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Re: New Hakko Digital Solder Iron and FET

gunrunnerjohn ·
I use .020 for PCB work and .031 for general wiring, etc. I agree 100% with Stan's removal method, that's exactly how I take chips off. I clip any leads I can and then sweep the little legs off with the iron. Far less damage to the PCB than excessive heat. As for the large tab, I secure the PCB, and then I grab the chip with pliers and heat the tab as Stan suggests. When it's loose, just lift it off. To put the new one on, I first clean off excess solder from the PCB. Then I position the...
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Re: New Hakko Digital Solder Iron and FET

GGG ·
Stan, I do not agree with cutting at body. I have seen it lift the leg pad when the leg moves away from the body laterally. I use a cutter with diagonal up and cut low at the pad. This lifts the cut leg while putting downward pressure on pad. I do this for all chips I cut. As far as the tab removal, that will take some heat. So I switch to a wider tip which get more heat in the area in a faster time frame. Apply heat with tweezers on the body to lift once the solder melts. If a difficult...
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Re: New Hakko Digital Solder Iron and FET

illinoiscentral ·
Look around the thing you are working on, including the case. If it says ROHS or if it has Pb with the circle slash thingy, it is for sure lead-free. Lead free is harder to work with and will need a higher temperature. If your Hakko is like my Hakko, it has a temperature sensor near the tip, and when the temperature drops, it kicks up the power, reducing the need for a bigger soldering iron, and in general making your life easier. I like the clip the small leads idea, as long as you are SURE...
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Re: New Hakko Digital Solder Iron and FET

upguy ·
I'd like to thank everyone who contributed to this post. The tips and suggestions gave me the confidence to proceed with the replacement of the FETs on my slave board. I set the temp of the FX 888D to 700 degrees, cut the 2 legs on each FET, heated the heatsink and used tweezers to remove when loose, then heated the remaining pieces of the legs and removed them. I then used no clean gel soldering flux to stick the new FET's in posiition while I held it down with tweezers and soldered the...
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Re: New Hakko Digital Solder Iron and FET

gunrunnerjohn ·
Gosh, I love success stories.
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Re: Selecting The Right Solder

John Ochab ·
Dan, Kester solder has a informative drop down menu under the general heading Knowledge Base, I use the 60/40 1/32 and 1/16 dia. Kester rosin core solder. John
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Re: Selecting The Right Solder

cjack ·
63/37 is the lowest melting temp of the Pb/Sn and is eutectic which means it transitions from liquid to solid at a lower temperature than either of its constituents or any other mixture of them. This also means that it avoids a slushy mixture during heating and cooling. It's my choice. From wiki... Alloys commonly used for electrical soldering are 60/40 Sn-Pb, which melts at 188 °C ( 370 °F ), and 63/37 Sn-Pb used principally in electrical/electronic work. 63/37 is a eutectic alloy of these...
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Re: Selecting The Right Solder

Dan Padova ·
Thanks
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Re: Selecting The Right Solder

gunrunnerjohn ·
I'm with Chuck, I use 63/37 rosin core exclusively. None of the lead-free junk for me, it doesn't work nearly as well! Since I've survived all this time using lead based solder, I figure if it was going to kill me, it would have done so before now.
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Re: Selecting The Right Solder

Casey Jones2 ·
Muliticore solder
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Re: Selecting The Right Solder

cjack ·
Right on. I just don't hold the solder in my teeth any more for a third hand when soldering...
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Re: Selecting The Right Solder

gunrunnerjohn ·
Yep, sucking on the lead based solder is considered bad form.
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Re: Selecting The Right Solder

cjack ·
And for SMD a friend made this for me... Which does this... ...it's a third hand to steady the part...
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Re: Selecting The Right Solder

gunrunnerjohn ·
Neat toy Chuck, I could use that.
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Re: Selecting The Right Solder

cjack ·
Somebody on a forum made one and it looked like a good thing.
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Re: Selecting The Right Solder

Dan Padova ·
Years ago I was working on College Hall at U of P. We were restoring the original double hung windows. Well the original paint was lead based of course. So we all had to be tested during the job for the amount of lead we may have absorbed. I passed out from the test !
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Re: Selecting The Right Solder

RJR ·
Looking at Cjack's post from wikipedia, in practice, is the 9 deg F difference between melting points of 63/37 and 60/40 noticeable? I agree that the lead-free is a bear to use. I have found that using the very thin 60/40 (I haven't found any 63/37 locally), permits use of one of the otherwise poor 8-watt battery irons for thin wires in out-of-the-way places.
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Re: Selecting The Right Solder

rtr12 ·
I like the 63/37 'Leaded' as well. The lead free stuff is terrible to use, as others have said. Just don't use any type of 'leaded' solder for anything that could be used for human consumption. Nowadays, I believe that is also illegal too, but it's fine for 'non-edible' electronics. DigiKey has a good selection, but may cost more than ebay though? I got some small 63/37 from them a couple years ago when I was ordering some other stuff. It didn't really seem all that expensive when I ordered...
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Re: Selecting The Right Solder

gunrunnerjohn ·
Kester most likely, it's a very popular brand.
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Re: Selecting The Right Solder

Joe Fauty ·
Dan: As others have said go with eutectic lead tin solder 63/37. For model train stuff you want the lowest melting temp solder you can get to protect sensitive components such as LED lights. You want the low temp especially if you are soldering microelectronic components on a circuit board. I was a microelectronics packaging engineer in my other life. During my tenure the government force all microelectronic industries to switch to non leaded solders. The next lowest temp solder was silver...
Topic

Soldering Iron

Dan Padova ·
I can use a new fine point soldering iron. I do alot of soldering involving miniature toggle switches, tiny wire splices, and pretty much anything that we do when we work on our trains. Any recommendations would be helpful. Thanks.
Topic

No-soldering layout

Bob Anderson ·
I've been enjoying the posts of jhainer, among others.  He writes as his tag line/signature, "I would love every aspect of model railroading if it wasn't for the wiring and soldering."  That got me to thinking: I've spent 2.5 years building a 11' x 12' bedroom-sized layout. It's nearly completed, and I've never picked up a soldering iron once. Every connection (track feeder lines, connection to accessories, ...) is made through what Radio Shack calls a "dual row barrier strip"...
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Selecting The Right Solder

Dan Padova ·
For years I have used 60/40 rosin core solder. I like to buy it in small diameter which is more suitable for tiny electrical connections I work with on my trains. I have two soldering irons and one gun. One of the soldering irons is butane fired, while the other is 110 volt house current. The soldering gun is a 260/140 degree Weller. All three have their uses depending on the type of work I am performing. I'm just about out of solder and am getting ready to buy more. I noticed some...
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Soldering!

PLCProf ·
Question -  Do any of the large train shows have a seminar on electrical soldering? I have been soldering wires since I was about 6 years old, and it is puzzling to me why it is such a problem for so many. Not to say that it is always the appropriate method, but, in view of the fact that it is cheap, sturdy and lightning fast I use it as often as possible. For anything involving leaded electronic parts it is really the only method! Just thinking that a "Soldering Seminar" might be an...
Topic

Cleaning tubular track

Dan Padova ·
I thought I had posted this question a few days ago, but I cannot seem to locate it. I cannot seem to locate alot of things these days. My question is on cleaning old tubular track. I like to solder my power leads to the rails. I brought out some old track last week to make a test oval. While there was no rust, the bright tinplate was tarnished. So in my wisdom, I took a maroon Scotchbrite pad and cleaned the spot where I wanted to solder, then cleaned the tops of the rails. How much does...
 
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