Tagged With "plastics hoppers"

Topic

plastic drive wheels?

Jim O'C ·
Found this cast iron clockwork loco with plastic wheels. Can anyone identify the motor? The bottom of the mechanism is mostly closed. broken cowcatcher should be easy enough to fix. Looks like a single band no. 17 Ives possibly? Anyone ever hear of plastic replacement wheels for zinc-pest infested locos?
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Re: plastic drive wheels?

WindupGuy ·
I have an Ives with that same basic late motor, but with stamped wheels instead of the die-cast. The body appears to be a 5th series No. 1, but has that very late motor in it. Interesting to say the least. It appears to me that this motor has both Ives and AF characteristics at this point. It never ceases to amaze and confuse me why companies like Ives and AF had such a plethora of body styles with minute differences in their cast iron locomotives. I would think that they would have made a...
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Re: plastic drive wheels?

Jim O'C ·
I think you are correct about it being a #176 from 1930. Everything seems to match up except the nylon wheels. Someone must have manufactured them for this purpose as the rear drive wheels have brass bushings and the drive rods are mounted to a raised nylon ferrule. The pin on the drive rod does not go all the way through the wheel. The chassis also has the third rail slider as you can see in the one picture.
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Re: plastic drive wheels?

WindupGuy ·
Very late Ives... I'm guessing a No. 17 / 176, circa 1930. I hope someone more well versed in Ives can confirm that. I've seen a lot of different homebrew replacement wheels, but the plastic (Teflon or Nylon, perhaps?) is new to me. I even had one with old metal bottle caps for wheels! That must have torn up the hardwood floors...
Topic

Safe Glue For Use On Postwar Plastics

Zach K ·
I had a small accident today and chipped the end of the catwalk on my 3530 generator car. It was a clean break and I have the piece ready to glue back on. What glues are "safe" for these plastics, by safe I mean what won't melt or discolor the plastic?
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Re: Safe Glue For Use On Postwar Plastics

bmoran4 ·
I have used this successfully. Just be sure to try out the applicator on some practice items first.
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Re: Safe Glue For Use On Postwar Plastics

Joe Fauty ·
Zach: BOM is correct - CA is probably the best way to go. I would recommend using a gel not liquid and if possible mate the parts and glue from the back. Joe
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Re: Safe Glue For Use On Postwar Plastics

Zach K ·
Thanks for the recommendations BMORAN4 and Joe! I'll be sure to pick up a bottle of the Loctite at the store tomorrow!
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Re: Safe Glue For Use On Postwar Plastics

Zach K ·
Here are the results C W. I used the Loctite glue BMORAN4 recommended. It almost impossible to tell where the break was unless you look very closely. The glue went on well with no adverse reaction. However if you knock the glued piece the wrong way it will separate, I think its because the break was so clean and smooth so the glue has no place to bond. If I find a replacement shell in good condition I may just replace this one but for now the glue has done a satisfactory job.
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Re: Safe Glue For Use On Postwar Plastics

C W Burfle ·
How did you make out with your project? I have not had good success using CA glue on plastic Lionel parts. The last thing I tried to glue with CA glue was a step on a postwar flatcar. The glue did not bond. One time I tried using CA glue on a postwar plastic truck (different type of plastic than the flat). The glue reacted with the truck, and it literally fell apart. Just yesterday I glued a broken postwar plastic coupler back together. It was cast from a white plastic and painted black. I...
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Re: Safe Glue For Use On Postwar Plastics

D500 ·
I hardly ever interact with PW Lionel (or other) equipment, but it seems like I glued something back together - and old banged-up PW shell or something that I was using in a low-end project - using Testors plastic cement. Just your standard, styrene-and-styrene-like plastic glue (actually a solvent, which is why it works so well). If PW plastic is related to styrene, this is your stuff. But, my memory is not clear on the repair. "Restorers" may want to go another way.
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Re: Safe Glue For Use On Postwar Plastics

Jim 1939 ·
I think you made the right choice. Super glue seems to work the best on PW plastic. Epoxy would be another. Without the correct solvent, industrial plastics are difficult to glue.
Topic

Replacing Lionel 566-54 Plastic Coupler Knuckle

John Fuller ·
I have of 566-54 Plastic Coupler Knuckle where the plastic spring broke. These are certainly easier to install than the cast ones, but apparently don't last as long. I tried replacing the plastic coupler with a traditional one, but the spring wouldn't open the coupler. Does anyone have any tips or tricks for replacing the plastic knuckle with something more reliable or do I just live with the fact they will need to be replaced more frequently. Thanks!
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Re: Replacing Lionel 566-54 Plastic Coupler Knuckle

rebuilder ·
I had some troubles on a u36c couplers and replaced with a complete assembly in die cast lionel part # 8855-50 but it depends on the coupler type you if these would work the ones I installed are flawless
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Re: Replacing Lionel 566-54 Plastic Coupler Knuckle

bmoran4 ·
The 480-8, 480-16, TC-23 combination is not a interchangeable for the 566-54 according to the service documents. The issue with these delerin knuckles is that most of time, rolling stock are stored with the knuckles closed eventually causing the spring to break. However, I have not had a replacement one fail on me - maybe you just had bad luck?
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Re: Replacing Lionel 566-54 Plastic Coupler Knuckle

rebuilder ·
i’ve installed the metal knuckles on the coupler arm upside down as recommended and used a paper clip to set the spring in place then carefully slid the rivet upwards pushing the paper clip out and keeping the spring in place then slip the knuckle into place it was not hard to do
Topic

Metal vs. Plastic Gearboxes for Kadees

Will Ebbert ·
What are y'alls preferences on plastic vs metal gearboxes? Right now I only have plastic but I'm about to order more couplers and want some input. Thanks!
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Re: Metal vs. Plastic Gearboxes for Kadees

Peltogle ·
Get metal they are more durable.
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Re: Metal vs. Plastic Gearboxes for Kadees

Ben Snyder ·
I agree with the above reply, however I use the plastic gearboxes on locomotives/ tenders to insulate from the middle rail. I have had a few little mishaps where a low trip pin or a slightly raised middle rail contacted for a short, the plastic box has eliminated any worry.
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Re: Metal vs. Plastic Gearboxes for Kadees

Hot Water ·
By ever so slightly reaming the center hole in the metal Kadee gear box, a 2-56 machine screw will fit through that hole. Drilling the proper hole in the under frame, and then taping to 2-56, one can tighten that screw pretty darn tight, which warps the plastic cover & gear box assembly.
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Re: Metal vs. Plastic Gearboxes for Kadees

prrjim ·
I am surprised you can tighten the screws through the boxes so tight to warp them without stripping out the threads in the carbody!
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Re: Metal vs. Plastic Gearboxes for Kadees

Jeff78rr ·
My experience shows that if you over tighten the plastic gear boxes the coupler freezes inside due to pressure. Metal boxes are very nice. I use both. Plastic on my locos, both on my freight cars. However, I am pretty much sold on Kadee's new 740 series couplers. These are as good as it can get for sure.
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Re: Metal vs. Plastic Gearboxes for Kadees

Laidoffsick ·
I only use metal boxes. Tried plastic, didnt like them. Too much flex preventing the coupler from swinging side to side freely. I get the 2R rail shorting issue, but for 3R...metal all the way, no doubt about it.
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Re: Metal vs. Plastic Gearboxes for Kadees

clem k ·
I had one short out on the third rail when it derailed. I prefer the plastic 800 series couplers only because they work better. The new 740 series look great ! and the metal ones are strong !! I just find the plastic boxes with plastic couplers couple and uncouple a lot easier, with the magnets and the pick. However 95% of my couplers are the new 740 series all metal. Clem
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Re: Metal vs. Plastic Gearboxes for Kadees

bob2 ·
It took 2-railers decades to get Kadee to put metal couplers and plastic boxes together. The boxes never fail, they completely insulate, and are no more obvious than wheelset insulation. If 3-railers buy them it reinforces Kadee's choice to offer them that way. Please do. You have no idea how important this is for 2-rail.
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Re: Metal vs. Plastic Gearboxes for Kadees

Train6666 ·
Never had a issue with hundreds of cars unless they hit the floor but then it's Ebay time.
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Re: Metal vs. Plastic Gearboxes for Kadees

Train6666 ·
All the above in G Little bit in O maybe 40 cars 2 rail.
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Re: Metal vs. Plastic Gearboxes for Kadees

Hot Water ·
OK, never had an issue with WHAT? The plastic gear box warping when tightening mounting screws?
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Re: Metal vs. Plastic Gearboxes for Kadees

Hot Water ·
I can fully appreciate why the 2-Rail modelers (both in HO and O) like/need the plastic gear box. However, in my experience when using just the center and rear mounting holes in the plastic gear box, they tend to warp when rightening the mounting screws good & tight. Thus, I use ONLY the metal Kadee gear boxes.
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Re: Metal vs. Plastic Gearboxes for Kadees

mwb ·
Completely agree. However, on the issue of durability, I've never had any of the plastic couplers or boxes fail in any way.
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Re: Metal vs. Plastic Gearboxes for Kadees

Mike DeBerg ·
I use metal where possible, as mentioned above. I do like the plastic gearboxes in places where I need to cutoff the rear portion of the gearbox for clearance, such as with a lot of MTH locomotives unless you want to cutoff the loop on the truck block instead? Just easier for me to use clippers on plastic gearbox vs dremel with cutoff wheel on metal gearbox. As noted, I've never had a failure of a plastic gearbox or plastic Kadee coupler, so it's really your personal choice.
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Re: Metal vs. Plastic Gearboxes for Kadees

clem k ·
To prevent shorts, it as been a safe practice to use metal boxes on plastic cars and plastic boxes on metal cars. The coupler themselves for durability use metal, for ease of operation use plastic. I have pulled an amazing amount of cars with all plastic Kadees.
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Re: Metal vs. Plastic Gearboxes for Kadees

CentralFan1976 ·
I like the metal, because I’m constantly having to modify them to fit the location, especially on diesels. But on my motive power I trim the pin anyway, so I can see why plastic would be important for 3rd rail isolation. -Mario
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Re: Metal vs. Plastic Gearboxes for Kadees

AGHRMatt ·
I prefer metal, but use plastic boxes on brass cars. The plastic box insulates the car from the metal couplers. The mounting screw provides the strength that prevents misalignment of the coupler under load. Over-tightening the box will inhibit coupler movement, though, so be judicious in tightening things down. Kadee 806 and 743's only come with plastic boxes.
Topic

Bridge Construction Materials

lehighline ·
I'm toying with the idea of building a tall, spindly trestle on my layout. For inspiration, I turned to the Kinzua Trestle in Western PA. The trestle was destroyed several years ago by a tornado, IIRC. A little research shows that there were 2 trestles built at the location. See the attached picture for the earlier one, which is what I want to use as a guide. My question is, what to use for constructing it? Plastic would definitely give me the shapes for the individual...
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Re: Bridge Construction Materials

AGHRMatt ·
Took some photos Saturday. Also, I checked with Dave O'Connor and they used 1/4 steel square stock as opposed to angle iron. The build would still be pretty much the same. Here are the close-up photos.
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Re: Bridge Construction Materials

AGHRMatt ·
Whoa! That's a big one...and very nice to boot. As a bridge troll, I think that would definitely make a nice build. What I'd recommend is that you build the "vertical" parts of the bents from small steel angle iron attached to square wooden bases (hidden under dirt and deck), then detail the cross members with Plastruct products. The deck itself can be wood, painted steel gray and detailed with more Plastruct. We did something similar with our curved modern trestle in the background. The...
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Re: Bridge Construction Materials

wsdimenna ·
think you may be able to find what you need here www.hunterline.com
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Re: Bridge Construction Materials

lehighline ·
WSDIMENNA, I'm familiar with the Hunterline product selection. Great stuff! In fact, I have one of their Howe Through Truss bridges. But they are wood, and not the look I want. Matt, I like what your club did! That may be the way to go. Do you have some close up shots of the piers? Also, if you have any shots of the piers under construction, that would be excellent. BTW, no plans make it as long as the original. If I did, it would poke along way out both sides of the train room! Chris LVHR
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Re: Bridge Construction Materials

AGHRMatt ·
Thanks. I don't have any close-up photos handy, so I'll take some close-up shots of the bents and the bridge Saturday when I'm down at the club. I took another look at the prototype and it would definitely lend itself to the angle-iron/plastruct construction. The trick with the bents will be the tops under the deck. What it looks like you'll be doing is using 1/4" stock for the track support while using 3/4" for the tops of the bents, plus some inserts in-between to keep them plumb and make...
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Re: Gargraves 37" Phantom Stainless flex track Plastic or Wood Ties

ADCX Rob ·
Use the wood tie flex track.
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Re: Gargraves 37" Phantom Stainless flex track Plastic or Wood Ties

Thaddeus ·
I like the wood tie flex track, plus its easier to work with my poor soldering skills.
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Gargraves 37" Phantom Stainless flex track Plastic or Wood Ties

Jerry Del ·
Now that I have decided on Gargraves Flex. I plan on bending all my own curves on plywood templates. My question is, based on ease of working with the track am I better off with the wood ties or the plastic ties. I,m thinking that the difference in realize-um between the two in minimal so which is easier to work with? Thanks Jerry
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Re: Gargraves 37" Phantom Stainless flex track Plastic or Wood Ties

Adriatic ·
I think you need to grind a coating or plating off of GG to solder easy. I have no experience with the plastic, but have to wonder if it is quieter. (e.g. I think Super O and Kline type track is quieter from the soft, dense, platic used).
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Re: Gargraves 37" Phantom Stainless flex track Plastic or Wood Ties

ADCX Rob ·
I guess I should have been more direct. There is no GarGraves plastic tie flex track, so you really don't have a choice.
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Re: Gargraves 37" Phantom Stainless flex track Plastic or Wood Ties

Dennis LaGrua ·
Have used plastic tie SS and standard Gargraves with wood. Unless you are doing an outside layout I would go with wood as its more realistic looking and easier to work with. Its also more economical. If you need a pre-bent curve Ross makes some really good ones.
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Re: Gargraves 37" Phantom Stainless flex track Plastic or Wood Ties

Jerry Del ·
Thanks again guys, great info !!!
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Re: Gargraves 37" Phantom Stainless flex track Plastic or Wood Ties

John C. ·
I've never had the plastic. I purchased wood just because I thought having wood would be cool! As far as bending the flex track I can do it easily now, but you do have to practice. The best piece of advice that was given to me: have patience and bend it slowly and gently. I start by placing the flex track against my chest and bending it around my torso. You can see a video of the sharpest curve I ever bent on my Youtube channel! A 24 diameter reversing loop used to turn snow equipment. Who...
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Re: Gargraves 37" Phantom Stainless flex track Plastic or Wood Ties

radar493 ·
Personally I plan my layout so I can use the curved sectional track. Never had good luck bending flex track. I have both plastic and wood ties.
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Re: Gargraves 37" Phantom Stainless flex track Plastic or Wood Ties

Barry Broskowitz ·
I think you need to grind a coating or plating off of GG to solder easy. All that needs to be done to sold to Gargraves tinplate track is to scrape off a bit of the Phantom track's center rail blackening. I use a Dremel with a fiber wheel to do so. Nothing need be done to the outside rails. However, if. you are soldering to Gargraves stainless steel track, that's somewhat more difficult overall. Regardless, you will need to remove the oily protective coating on all new Gargraves track. I use...
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