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It is hard to believe this set is 100 years old!

American Flyer set 1201 from 1921.

The set came with a new end label on its box, which was featured in 1921 only. Note the end label is not showing the 3020, which was not introduced until 1922.

NWL

Last edited by Nation Wide Lines
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Mea culpa.  Just after I posted the "1921" series Bing for Bassett Lowke coach photos I realized that they were actually not produced until  the following years.  1922 --GWR Lake and Midland; 1926-- LMS and 1929--Southern.  The only ones actually produced in 1921 were the London & Northwestern and here they are.  LewBing B:L L&NW Coaches

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  • Bing B:L L&NW Coaches

I don't think I have any set or train related item I know was made specifically in 1921 but I do have a number of items that could easily date from 1921.

  In the U.S., prohibition kicked it into gear on January 17, 1920. Among the many things outlawed by prohibition were advertisements for liquor.  For Bing, this meant their beer reefers could no longer display the word "beer" on the sides of the cars.  As a result, starting in 1920,  Bing censored all of the beer reefers they exported to the U.S.  The car below is one of these cars and given the date of the start of prohibition it could have been made in 1921.

Censored Bing Beer Reefer

Bing_Car_Reefer_Schlitz_Censored

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  • Bing_Car_Reefer_Schlitz_Censored

I don't think I have any set or train related item I know was made specifically in 1921 but I do have a number of items that could easily date from 1921.

  In the U.S., prohibition kicked it into gear on January 17, 1920. Among the many things outlawed by prohibition were advertisements for liquor.  For Bing, this meant their beer reefers could no longer display the word "beer" on the sides of the cars.  As a result, starting in 1920,  Bing censored all of the beer reefers they exported to the U.S.  The car below is one of these cars and given the date of the start of prohibition it could have been made in 1921.

Censored Bing Beer Reefer

Bing_Car_Reefer_Schlitz_Censored

I had no idea that prohibition laws went so far as to "censor" toys!  Amazing!

Does anyone else have some more examples of "censored toys"?

Bob Nelson

I don't think I have any set or train related item I know was made specifically in 1921 but I do have a number of items that could easily date from 1921.

  In the U.S., prohibition kicked it into gear on January 17, 1920. Among the many things outlawed by prohibition were advertisements for liquor.  For Bing, this meant their beer reefers could no longer display the word "beer" on the sides of the cars.  As a result, starting in 1920,  Bing censored all of the beer reefers they exported to the U.S.  The car below is one of these cars and given the date of the start of prohibition it could have been made in 1921.

Censored Bing Beer Reefer

Bing_Car_Reefer_Schlitz_Censored

They censored more than the word "beer" on that car, as the Schlitz's motto was "The Beer That Made Milwaukee Famous"  However, I suppose the car would have looked funny as "The XXXXX That Made Milwaukee Famous"

NWL

  NWL - I agree.  If the word "beer" was in the text line Bing censored the entire line.  I don't have any pictures of the censored Pabst or Budweiser cars but when you find them what you will see 

Pabst Car

Bing_Car_Reefer_Pabst

for the Pabst car the line "The Beer of Quality" is blanked out

Budweiser Car

Bing_Car_Reefer_Budweiser

and for the Budweiser car the line "King of all bottled beers" is blanked out.

   My guess is from a production standpoint it was probably easier to cross out an entire line than try to line up a censor print to target a single word.

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  • Bing_Car_Reefer_Budweiser

Here’s my favorite car aged over 100 years, a Lionel #36 observation cars.  Available evidence indicates that it’s a 1915 car about to celebrate its 105th birthday.  Here’s a summary of the dating exercise. 

But first the commercial.  I’m going to include photos of my car next to items in Greenburg’s Standard Gauge book.  Without Bruce’s efforts, this exercise couldn’t have happened – it’s been well worth the $100 price tag.

36a36b

First both sides of the car.  The third photo is about the unusual window insert which have red shades, blue lavatory windows and a red door window.  In all three of my Lionel prewar references, the only place I could find that configuration was at the bottom of p. 342 of Greenburg.  The captions states it is 1915, dark blue, with type 8 railings.  Now I have one date possibility.

36c

Next the observation railing.  It is what Greenburg calls a type 8, found only on 336, but no date .information.  It looks as it the use of the type 9 began in 1916.

36e36f

Then there is the hole size of the steps.    According to Greenburg the original daimeter was .140", changed to .0125 about 1918.  Mine measure .01375, which indicates not later than 1918.

36r36q

Finally is a photo of the end.  Look through the end door and you can see a rivet and clip type fastening.  It looks like a Greenburg type 5, which he says could have begun production “as early as 1914”. The coupler in the photo is a reproduction filed to match the dimensions of the original.  The original .is lost – may be found some day when cleaning my workshop area.one of the many corners of the basement

36d

Putting it all together, I think the most likely date for my car is 1915, but maybe 1914, less likely 16 or 17.

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  • 36a
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Here's another locomotive from before 1921, my 1918 Lionel 152 restoration (in progress).   It has a type 3 motor, first made in 1918 per volume 1 of Greenberg's new O gauge book.  The coupler is riveted to the frame, last used in 1917.  So I suppose my 152 was made in 1918 using a frame left over from 1917.

The engine is now in kit form, and I'm still cleaning the parts.  The body is ready for painting.

152a

Here is the whole kit.  You can see parts from two 152's.  It's nice to have two of them so I can take the best of each kind of part.

152b

This is a typical type 3 (Greenberg types) motor with riveted coupler.  The frames and motors from different years can be combined.  The thick wire sticking up attaches to the headlight.  The only wire I had to replace was from the brush holder to the field coil.

152e

This photo is to show the pickup mechanism.  It had been altered badly by a former owner.  Fortunately, Iwas able to cut a roller from the other 152 and solder it to this one. I did have to use a screw that doesn't look quite right.

152g

Here is detail of the coupler.  The white rolled up card stock is a simulation of the rivet.  A machinist friend is using his lathe to make a rivet with the correct dimensions.  The photo below my engine is from Greenberg's Guide to Lionel Trains O Gauge, volume 1.  IT's a great value for $100 if you want to projects like this one.

152p

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  • 152a
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NW, great topic! Nice trains showing up too! I went mid years since Lionel's 158 was produced 1919- 1923ish. All original and great little runner. The outfit # would be 159 however no idea if they originally came with gray gondolas. IMG_20210118_061213IMG_20210118_061358

Greenberg's new (2017) O gauge book shows Lake Shore gons in gray with black lettering 1920-1927.  Page 129 of the book shows Outfit 157 with the gray locomotive 1920-1923.  It looks as if outfit 159 was the passenger train.

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