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Are you talking about a 227?   If so it is a set with boxes.    Set +$  Boxes +$.  Collectable +$.

I have long ago given up making sense of some prices and bidders.  Many forget the buyers premium they add on. 

They are desireable as top of the line pre-war high detail/quality locomotives.  0-6-0 arrangement on the locos.  Some of the first die cast engines as lionel moved away from tinplate before the war.   There are 227, 228, 230, 232, 233 and 701.    Essentially the same engine and tender with differences in front boiler ID, 2 prewar coupler heights and teledyne or Majic Electrol options.  227 is most numerous followed by 228 from what I see.    The 701 tends to draw a higher price.   No follow up to these engines in the postware era.

I obtained my 227 a few years ago as a fixer upper.   I would like to have a couple more of the series, but the prices are beyond my budget currently.

Many will need repair even at these prices.   The modern era 18000 version of the 227 tends to hold value today. 

There are the prewar 201/203 0-6-0 engines also.  Smaller tender, different motor and casting.   They go for much less, but still pricey IMHO.

From this era are the 0-4-0 1662/1663 locos with the smaller tenders.  Their wheels tend to have trouble in Post war Control tracks and switches.  Postwar 1656/1615 versions are similar but the wheels work well on postwar setups.

The 224, 225, 226 and 229 locos follow the numbering but are completely different designs.  In general more readily available engines.  These are the fore-runners of many postwar engines. 

@VHubbard You explained the Lionel prewar steam switchers very well. I have them all and would bid over what the normal/typical bids if I wanted something for whatever reason. They are wonderful locomotives. All of them and the scale 701 followed the release of the scale Hudson in the 1930's. I think you missed the 231 in your listing of the 227-series of these switchers.

Good luck with yours!

Tom

@VHubbard posted:

Are you talking about a 227?   If so it is a set with boxes.    Set +$  Boxes +$.  Collectable +$.

I have long ago given up making sense of some prices and bidders.  Many forget the buyers premium they add on.

They are desireable as top of the line pre-war high detail/quality locomotives.  0-6-0 arrangement on the locos.  Some of the first die cast engines as lionel moved away from tinplate before the war.   There are 227, 228, 230, 232, 233 and 701.    Essentially the same engine and tender with differences in front boiler ID, 2 prewar coupler heights and teledyne or Majic Electrol options.  227 is most numerous followed by 228 from what I see.    The 701 tends to draw a higher price.   No follow up to these engines in the postware era.

I obtained my 227 a few years ago as a fixer upper.   I would like to have a couple more of the series, but the prices are beyond my budget currently.

Many will need repair even at these prices.   The modern era 18000 version of the 227 tends to hold value today.

There are the prewar 201/203 0-6-0 engines also.  Smaller tender, different motor and casting.   They go for much less, but still pricey IMHO.

From this era are the 0-4-0 1662/1663 locos with the smaller tenders.  Their wheels tend to have trouble in Post war Control tracks and switches.  Postwar 1656/1615 versions are similar but the wheels work well on postwar setups.

The 224, 225, 226 and 229 locos follow the numbering but are completely different designs.  In general more readily available engines.  These are the fore-runners of many postwar engines.

Thanks for the overview of Lionel switchers - I never knew there were so many variations.  I also agree about buyers not factoring in the buyers premium and shipping - you'd think that people have figured it out by now, but apparently not.

I beg to differ about the 18000 from 1990ish holding their value.  As I recall, I purchased one new for $700 or $800 when they came out (probably equivalent to $1500 now); today, they can be commonly found online at meets or online for $200-300 in like new or mint condition (albeit with solidified grease).

There are 15 variations of this Casting. Current pricing typically runs about $2000 for a C7+ boxed example and higher for a boxed set. Highest seen is $9500 for a super pristine example.   Condition REALLY is king here. ... the rarest of these models still command a premium. 227s and 228s are very common and go for around $800 unboxed in VG (C6) condition.

@Mallard4468 posted:

Probably more like $1600-1700 after premium, taxes, and shipping.  Maybe that's still a good deal - I don't know enough about that item to say.  I just hope that the buyer considered the add-on costs.

It was a good deal to the person who got it, and that's all that matters.

Don't assume that we, the high bidders on things, don't understand how it works with the premium, shipping, etc..

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