Skip to main content

Dear Friends, I have started with 3D printing and already found a very handy project where the designing and printing really did a great job to solve the problem with Atlas underbody bolsters always being a mess. That's clearly the down side of multi-gauge manufacturing that you always need enough clearance for the 3-rail fraction.

My Prusa i3Mk3 was surely quite an investment and to build it up from parts a challenge. It runs surprisingly well and the filament forms super strong parts.

I've designed the part in Autodesk Fusion 360 after watching some tutorials on YouTube. The software is free for private use.

IMG_2506

The amazing thing is how exact the measurements are (0.1mm).

IMG_2487

Here's the finished frame with shims between bolster and draft gear box. I incorporated these into a next version of the part.

IMG_2497

I am a big time fan of Jay Criswell's cast proto:48 conversion bolsters to re-use your old IM truck parts. The wheels are NWSL.

IMG_2492

The print is so exact that you can easily achieve a perfect fit of that trucks, they glide on these little pads and ensure an upright car body.

IMG_2493

You might have seen some stepping in the filament print. That's clearly there but could be sanded easily. I did not because you can't see what's going on under that truck from no angle.

IMG_2531

This boxcar conversion was a real learning challenge but now I have the file to print these as needed. More cars are waiting in the basement.

IMG_2527



Greetings from Austria

Sarah

Attachments

Images (7)
  • IMG_2487
  • IMG_2497
  • IMG_2492
  • IMG_2493
  • IMG_2506
  • IMG_2531
  • IMG_2527
Videos (1)
IMG_2219
Original Post

Replies sorted oldest to newest

"Look at the resin printers as they can print with higher resolution."

Yes, and no. Resin printers will indeed print at a higher resolution, but there are lots of things that you make for which resin is not as good an alternative as the FDM printers and for which you don't NEED a high rez for.  The things that she is making is a good example, quick and easy print, made out of strong plastic. Resin printers are frankly, a pain in the ***. They are great for some things, no doubt, but it is sort of like cooking. You pour the liquid in the vat, don't breathe it if you can help it, then you start your print. IF all goes well, you then open the machine and have a dripping wet item and whatever liquid is left over in the vat. You take the plate off the machine that your print is stuck to and either get your rubber gloves on and take it off the build plate or else leave it attached and open up your Iso alcohol and swish the item around in it for 5 minutes or so. Then you blow off the excess with an air hose and rewash it in soapy water. Then, still wearing gloves so you don't get it on your skin, you have to set it with UV light. This is usually best down while your part is submerged in water, so you need a glass container large enough to hold whatever you print.  Oh yea, you have to remove the item at some point from the build plate. It will be stuck pretty good, sometimes you ruin your part unsticking it. Anyway, once the UV light has cured the part, you can safely touch it now with your bare hands. But don't let the cat or dog chew on it, it is still toxic. Now, if you cured it while in water, it probably has not warped any. Otherwise, you got to decide if slight warping matters.  Let it sit for a week and it may warp more, you just never know. Oh, and while you are waiting, you need to get a bottle and run the left over liquid in the vat through a very fine filter.  You NEVER put used resin back into the virgin resin bottle. And you can dunk you vat into your alchy and clean it too after draining it.

OR, you can buy a roll of plastic of whatever kind you want to use, print it on the FDM printer and it is ready to use, no washing, curing, blah, blah, blah. Whoops, you say the dog got ahold of it and chewed it, no problem, dog will be fine, just print a new one...

Resin printers are frankly, a pain in the ***.

not if you have a nice one like a FormLabs3 that auto-fills the tank and has resin cartridges. I rarely have an issue with my prints.

also resin prints are isotropic meaning strong in all directions. FDM or rather tube printers print objects that are inherently weak in the Z-direction. Warping rarely occurs if your print is properly designed. Certain resins used by dentists is not toxic.

Last edited by AlanRail

Other companies are catching up with Formlabs.  Elegoo Jupiter launches tomorrow.  Unlike Formlabs it uses a built plate to keep costs down.  They will have a build volume compatible build volumes and resolutions (10.9" x 6.6" x 11.8" and 0.002" respectively) .

I don't have any experience with the water soluble resins so I can't comment on the smell or toxicity.

Jan

Before you spend 15-20 times more on a Form Labs, do some research.  The resin for these are 3-4 time more than for most of the cheaper ones, but a bigger problem seems to be poor customer service and slow shipment of supplies.   They could be easier to use, more bells and whistles, and less tweaking needed for good prints, but a side by side comparison of prints with the $200 printer I use,  will show no difference.

@AlanRail posted:

Resin printers are frankly, a pain in the ***.

not if you have a nice one like a FormLabs3 that auto-fills the tank and has resin cartridges. I rarely have an issue with my prints.

also resin prints are isotropic meaning strong in all directions. FDM or rather tube printers print objects that are inherently weak in the Z-direction. Warping rarely occurs if your print is properly designed. Certain resins used by dentists is not toxic.

Aren't resin printers old technology?  My brother did his aerospace engineering master's thesis using resin printing technology in 1996.

So is FDM printing.  It is the engineering that goes into the printers.  The low-cost resin printers use LCD panels like in your TV and phone to mask each layer.  Mono LCD panels are used now instead of color which results in faster printing and longer panel life.  An array of UV LEDs instead of scanning lasers set the resin.  That's why you can get a small printer for under $200.  The build area is limited by the size of the LCD panel.

Mechanical techniques like the traveling laser in the Formlabs printers make for a larger build area.

The resolutions of the printers in comparable.i

Jan

Got a new design: I'm experimenting with getting a Union Pacific O-50-6 tank car printed and by now I feel up to designing the model. Fusion 360 is really very intuitive and with some tutorials it turns more and more into a handy tool for modelling bigger projects. The turret's rivet rows were really tricky, though.

Attachments

Images (3)
  • mceclip0
  • mceclip1
  • mceclip2
@Jan posted:

Other companies are catching up with Formlabs.  Elegoo Jupiter launches tomorrow.  Unlike Formlabs it uses a built plate to keep costs down.  They will have a build volume compatible build volumes and resolutions (10.9" x 6.6" x 11.8" and 0.002" respectively) .

I don't have any experience with the water soluble resins so I can't comment on the smell or toxicity.

Jan

I've got an order in for a Jupiter ($600 kickstarter price). Hate having to wait until early next year for it to ship, but the price can't be beat, and the self-refilling vat is especially great for large items (as is the extendable Z axis modules). Currently have a Qidi Shadow 5.5s, works great, but the small build size really limits its usability to detail parts for the most part.

I exclusively use water washable resin (have a bottle of the regular stuff lying around, but alcohol was ridiculously hard to come by during the beginning of the pandemic). It's not as versatile, as most tend to be rather fragile when cured, but the ease of cleanup makes it worthwhile for most of the stuff I print.

Dick,

There are many places on the web that have models that you can download.  Just search on 3d models.  Here are a few.  The models come in various stages of the design/print process and some have restrictions.

https://www.thingiverse.com/

https://3dprint.com/24721/open-railway-project-3d/

https://www.cgtrader.com/free-3d-models/train

I use a freeware CAD package called FreeCAD  It is a powerful parametric modeller.  This allows one to use equations to define the relationships between the various dimensions of the model.  By changing a few values all related dimensions will be changed to reflect the new values.  There are many tutorials om YouTube show its use.

We have a Elegoo Saturn MSLA  resin printer, Dremel 3D45 FDM printer, and an ANYCUBIC Photon S 3D Printer.  We chose to receive our Jupiter printer in June.  We figured they would have 5 months to work out all the bugs.

My nephew is running some parts for comparison between the Saturn and Dremel.  When we have some pictures we'll post them to this thread.

Jan

another way to look at resolution is how it relates to scale.

actual 1/4" is 12" in scale

1/8" is  6"

1/16" is 3"

1/32"  is 1.5" in scale.  anything smaller is  too weak or looks like an undefined  blob.

so the smallest  diameter of a handrail that can be printed is 1/32' but at that size unless supported will be way too weak.

also if those bolts are less than 1/32"  or 1.5" diameter you need to test how your printer prints this small a detail.

Last edited by AlanRail

not really saying that; Resin prints are isotropic meaning strong in all directions; tube prints are weak vertically because they are printed in vertical layers where vertical layer adhesion is dependent on the relative melting cohesion of successive layers.

FormLabs has developed dozens of different resins that are far stronger and flexible than plastics used in tube printers. Take a look at the webpage Formlabs 3D Printing Materials Library



Their Resins are not brittle.

Last edited by AlanRail

I remember that 20 years or so ago, when 3-D printers were first invented, it was announced with great fanfare that they would totally revolutionize manufacturing in the 21st Century, and that in short order, everything from your cars to pancake flippers would be made by 3-D printers.

It didn't happen.  In my book, a real flop.

Good to hear that they may be of use in making train stuff!

Mannyrock

HERE are 27 products that looked great but flopped.

In twenty years, 3D printing has not made the list.

1) McDonald’s Arch Deluxe

I still remember commercials on TV for the Arch Deluxe which began airing in 1996 but no amount of advertising could save this burger. It was an attempt to offer “upscale” product offerings but customers weren’t lovin’ it.

2) Ben-Gay Aspirin

Ben-Gay is a strong brand because when you hear the word “Ben-Gay”, you immediately think of pain relief cream. But that is the problem and the main reason why this aspirin product never lasted. People just didn’t like the thought of swallowing anything relating to Ben-Gay.

3) Bic Underwear

Bic is a company that is well-known for its line of disposable razors, lighters, and pens. When the company released underwear, most consumers didn’t understand why and passed.

4) Kellogg’s Breakfast Mates

More failed products that probably looked good on paper but kids just didn’t understand the packaging or its instructions. Opening a box of cereal and pouring cold fresh milk in a bowl is so much easier and Kellogg’s later realized this.

5) Cheetos Lip Balm

If you love licking your fingers after eating Cheetos, you would think this product would be great. Unfortunately, it apparently didn’t even taste like Cheetos.

6) Colgate Frozen Kitchen Entrees

Colgate may be one of the leading toothpaste brands but consumers just couldn’t comprehend buying Colgate “food”. I suppose Colgate thought that by eating a Colgate meal, people would then brush afterwards with Colgate toothpaste but it was a bad idea from the start.

7) Coors Rocky Mountain Water

While soft drink companies are successfully selling water under different brands, Coors just couldn’t do the same with it’s rocky mountain water. When consumers buy Coors water, they expect it to be fermented with barley, hops, and yeast.

8) Cosmopolitan Yogurt

Sure, yogurt is a growing product category but when you’re a company that publishes 58 editions and distributes them to more than 100 countries, then Cosmopolitan should stick to what it does best. They did try to sell their own brand of yogurt but lackluster sales caused them to pull their failed products off shelves after only 18 months.

9) Crystal Pepsi

In the 90’s, people were were obsessed with clear products. Clear soap, see-through phones, and transparent soft drinks. Pepsi jumped onto the bandwagon by offering Crystal Pepsi but it didn’t last long.

10) Microsoft Bob

27 Failed Products - Microsoft Bob.

Source Unknown

Bob’s your uncle or so Microsoft thought. Bob was released who found Windows 95 intimidating since so many new customers were purchasing computers for the first in the mid-90’s because of this this thing called the “Internet” that started getting popular around 1995. Bob was supposed to help with simple tasks but it only made things more complicated so Microsoft didn’t create future versions of the software.

11) Sony’s Betamax

Sony may have been first to market with its Betamax in 1975, but the format wars began when JVC and Matsu****a released the VHS format and video player two years later in 1977. Because VHS was a licensed standard, any company could produce video players which drove costs down but because Sony didn’t license the Betamax format, its players remained expensive.

12) Ford Edsel

Ford has had a lot of success in its 100+ year history but the Ford Edsel wasn’t a model they could call a winner. It was called the “Titanic of Automobiles” and had disappointing sales. When Ford released the Mustang in 1964, it was a huge success and anybody that still had a bad taste in their mouth about the Edsel quickly forgot about it after driving a Mustang.

13) Gerber Singles

Back in 1974, Gerber wanted to expand their line of pureed meats, vegetables, and fruits to college kids or people that were living alone for the first time. Nothing makes you feel more like an adult than eating meat mush out of a baby food jar with a spoon. Needless to say, their failed products didn’t last long on the market.

14) Harley Davidson Perfume

I know what you’re thinking. What man doesn’t want to smell like a ‘Hot Road’? It’s understandable that Harley-Davidson owners want to own everything the company makes because the brand is legendary but loyal customers had to draw the line somewhere.

15) Heinz EZ Squirt Ketchup

Ketchup is a difficult product to expand because customers are already happy with Heinz ketchup. There is only so many ways to improve ketchup but Heinz thought one way to expand the product line was by creating “mystery colors”. While kids may have enjoyed its grossness factor, it wasn’t enough for Heinz to keep it in their product line.

16) HP TouchPad

Failed products like this tablet from HP was far from being the “iPad killer” some tech magazines and websites were claiming it to be. It was based on a new operating system called webOS and had virtually no third-party support which is why retailers quickly had a fire sale to get rid of it as quickly as possible.

17) Earring Magic Ken

When Mattel decided to release a hipper version of Ken in 1993 featuring a mesh t-shirt, lavender vest, and one earring, it didn’t expect to get so much backlash. It drew criticism from the gay community for proposing false stereotypes and Mattel stopped production of the doll.

18) Life Savers Soft Drinks

Life Savers may be one of Wrigley’s most successful products and the number one brand of non-chocolate candy but as a soft drink, it tanked. Drinking liquid candy just didn’t win over consumers.

19) McDonald’s McDLT

Nobody likes soggy burgers so McDonald’s figured that if they could provide a burger that separated the cold condiments and veggies from the hot beef patty, they’d have a winner. It didn’t last long and it partly was because customers did not like having to assemble their burgers and making a mess.

20) Microsoft Zune

Microsoft released the Zune almost five years after the original iPod and couldn’t make a dent in Apple’s 65% market share in personal audio players. It was discontinued in 2011 and Microsoft encouraged users to purchase a Windows phone instead but that strategy doesn’t seem to be working either.

21) New Coke

When Coca-Cola released the “New Coke” in 1985, executives could probably hear their loyal customers around the world weeping every time they took a sip. After boycotts and protests, Coca-Cola quickly reintroduced the original Coke as “Coke Classic”.

22) Apple Newton

The Apple Newton was ahead of its time and had great features but the only problem was, most of the features didn’t work properly such as writing recognition. The product may have initially flopped but it paved the way for the Palm Pilot, BlackBerry, and eventually the iPhone (ditched the stylus!)

23) Pepsi A.M.

Cola soft drinks have caffeine and so does coffee right? Pepsi thought they could no wrong by offering a soft drink you can drink in the morning but most consumers didn’t want to drink soft drinks morning, noon, and night.

24) The Segway

The Segway is another great example of failed products that received tons of hype in the press but failed miserably when they were actually released. The company expected to sell anywhere from 50,000 to 100,000 units in its first year but it took them over two years to sell a meager 23,500 units.

25) RJ Reynolds’ Smokeless Cigarettes

These came out in 1988 and apparently “produced a smell and a flavor that left users retching”. Sounds great already! Besides the fact that they tasted horrible, rumors began circulating that they were being used by some customers as a delivery device for crack cocaine. The company quickly pulled them off the shelves.

26) Thirsty Cat! and Thirsty Dog! bottled water

In what could be considered a soft drink for pets, this daily pet drink had great flavors like Tasty Beef and Tangy Fish. While pets probably enjoyed it, pet owners didn’t see a need for feeding the pets with sugar water.

27) WOW! snack foods

Olestra is a fat substitute that was approved by the FDA in 1996 and still approved to this day. These chips may cause stomach upset, cramps, gas, and loose bowels but they’re fat free! All kidding aside, consumers just weren’t ready for snack foods with a health disclaimer on every package.

NOTHING ABOUT 3D printers.

@Mannyrock posted:

I remember that 20 years or so ago, when 3-D printers were first invented, it was announced with great fanfare that they would totally revolutionize manufacturing in the 21st Century, and that in short order, everything from your cars to pancake flippers would be made by 3-D printers.

It didn't happen.  In my book, a real flop.

Good to hear that they may be of use in making train stuff!

Mannyrock

3D printing is still evolving, but it will still be a while before products can be cranked out as fast as conventional. manufacturing.  However, 3D printing has found it's place in the prototyping process and for making master molds.

Rusty

I remember eating the Lays Potato Chips with Olestra, and being sick for 4 hours afterwards!  (They should have tested in on prisoners first.)

The Segway was going to revolutionize foot travel throughout the urban world.  The inventor actually donated the Patent to the public good.   I guess he didn't think about how many curbs there are in the world.  It could climb a curb, but it looked like a donkey trying to go up a set of stairs.

Alan, what does one of the 3D printers you are using for trains cost?

Mannyrock

MR-  I only wish I could predict the futures of anything!

Look 3D printers are nothing like the STAR TREK replicators.  If that's your idea of a non-flop then you are correct.

COST. the cost is not just the price of the printers and  other washing, post-processing accessories and resin (Cost 2 Lionel BigBoys.)

It's the cost and time to learn a 3D modeling program, how to create a model for 3D printing (Sarah says that Fusion is intuitive) and setting up the model orientation in the printer's slicer program to correctly print.

WOW...Bic underwear!!! Where do you stick the pen...LOL!    Anyway off track there....     Sarah, wonderful job with the 3D printer.    There is a guy from Nebraska who I talked to at the recent St. Louis (Mo) RPM Meet in July, that 3D prints Behlen Grain Storage buildings in HO scale.   I had him make me one in O scale...wow, what a big building, and the detail is great.   Now he is going to make an add on kit.    Yes, 3D printing can be a saver when you just cannot find parts commercially available.   Keep up the great work!

Last edited by R Nelson
@Mannyrock posted:

I remember that 20 years or so ago, when 3-D printers were first invented, it was announced with great fanfare that they would totally revolutionize manufacturing in the 21st Century, and that in short order, everything from your cars to pancake flippers would be made by 3-D printers.

It didn't happen.  In my book, a real flop.

Good to hear that they may be of use in making train stuff!

Mannyrock

They didn't flop, the problem was the hype machine oversold how fast it would develop. One person I know talking about 3d printing, said "well, look at how fast smart phones took off".....the only thing is smart phones were not revolutionary technology either, in the sense that it represented putting together existing technology in a way no one thought of. The cell phone technology was not new at all, the chips to run the app were not exotic technology and the data technology (now at 5g level) was not earthshakingly new.

3d printing has advanced tremendously in 20 years (and I can see that, and I am not an expert). No, it isn't the star trek replicator kind of thing, but that was hype, not reality. It has developed the way a lot of other revolutionary technology developed, it takes time. The fact that you can get home printers at a reasonable cost is one sign of that. What you don't see is how it is being used behind the scenes. It is being used by military contractors to print parts, I read something not long ago that the military was developing systems to allow them to literally build replacement parts when out in the field. It is being used to prototype parts for manufacturing, but is also being used to print things commercially. And it is advancing, what Sarah did in this thread wouldn't have been possible not all that many years ago.

@bigkid posted:

It is always really nice to have someone to catch up to on something, you can't be top dog in everything, GRJ

You can be sure that there are many areas that I'm not even in the dog fight, and this is one of them.   I've looked at 3D printers a host of times, but I just can't see how I'd have the time to actually develop the skills to use them effectively.

@Mannyrock posted:

I remember that 20 years or so ago, when 3-D printers were first invented, it was announced with great fanfare that they would totally revolutionize manufacturing in the 21st Century, and that in short order, everything from your cars to pancake flippers would be made by 3-D printers.

It didn't happen.  In my book, a real flop.

Good to hear that they may be of use in making train stuff!

Mannyrock

My brother was doing 3D printing for his master's thesis back in the early to mid 90's.  The technology is not new.

You can be sure that there are many areas that I'm not even in the dog fight, and this is one of them.   I've looked at 3D printers a host of times, but I just can't see how I'd have the time to actually develop the skills to use them effectively.

I hear you, I know how I am with CAD programs (just designing my modest layout in a rail design program burned out brain cells, and it was a simple design,no grades, no 3d version, etc) or visual design programs, and it would be a full time job. This is kind of one of those things that goes in "when I am retired, and have the time". 

I just can't see how I'd have the time to actually develop the skills to use them effectively.

John if I, a former structural engineer and lawyer can design and build a circuit board .....you can design a 3D object.

I started with TINKERCAD an easy free 3D modeling program. Modeling is just putting together 3D shapes like squares ,rectangular boxes spheres or cylinders to resemble your model then subtracting holes or parts you don't want.

You clearly understand that Printing is just converting your model to a .STL file that is read by a slicer program that creates vertical slices that the printer prints in steps.

It really is not that hard to do or I couldn't do it either.

Last edited by AlanRail

Disclaimer: It's HO and a UK-prototype channel...

YouTuber 'Sam's Trains' documented his experience with getting a 3D printer and learning to build various pieces of (UK-inspired) rolling stock of increasing sophistication, (by his own admission, not nitpicker-grade modeling). A significant part of these videos (and the entirety of the fifth one) is narrating the building of the 3d models in reiatively simple CAD applications like the web-app version of SketchUp (the...only free version unless you use the 2017 SketchUp Make)

As of this writing he has yet to put all those videos in the playlist he created for them (i left a comment on his most recent video asking if he noticed this), so I tried to present them in the order released--had he populated his 3d printing playlist I would have just linked to that, so apologies in advance for the string of embeds...

Binge-watching all seven videos will take about 4 hours 40-ish minutes, so maybe bookmark the post and watch them over the course of a few days if you find the process interesting.

Below, a tutorial video narrating the build of a basic gondola in SketchUp:

---PCJ

@Sarah posted:

Thanks, sure – these domes are specifically done for the UP O-50-6 type tank car, quite a big one, carrying 12.515 gallons. That means the radius for the dome to fit is made for a tank of 48.5mm in diameter. I love to share!

Sarah

Okay, that'll be a wee bit large; can you knock that back down to 40 mm OD and all that then?

Last edited by mwb

Great stuff, Sarah!

I scratch built a bunch of marker lanterns for cabooses and ends of passenger trains. I thought it would be a pretty simple project to drill out holes on 3 axis in twenty-six tiny metal beads, shape the end of brass screws for the bottoms and add some brass tube and pins on the top and solder it all together. By the time I did all of that I'm sure I could have learned how to make them with 3D printing, such simple shapes, and they'd have printed out very consistent. I wish I would have done it this way.

Last edited by christopher N&W

That a question like: How long is a road!

Obviously, 3D printers come in all price ranges from a couple hundred to tens of thousands of dollars!  Pricing is based in the size of model, the media used to print, and the printing technology.

How long it takes to learn to program is again a question only you can really evaluate.  It will be at least how long it takes you to learn to do 3D design drawings, again a number nobody can really state as it depend on the individual.

You can use existing 3D designs much faster, but even learning the in's and out's of a specific 3D printer is a vary variable number.

1. That a question like: How long is a road!

2.  How long it takes to learn to program is again a question only you can really evaluate.  It will be at least how long it takes you to learn to do 3D design drawings, again a number nobody can really state as it depend on the individual.

1.

2. I have a sense that our Sarah is a pretty fast learner... 🙂

Mark in Oregon

Last edited by Strummer
@Alan Mancus posted:

how much are the 3D printers to purchase and how hard are they to learn to program and approximate how much time it takes to learn how !

Alan

How hard is it to learn drafting?  I remember several in my high school drafting class that never really got the hang of it.  Things always look easy until you try to do it.

When making a cad file, you have to be precise with your dimensions and proportions.  Everything you want to be on your model has to be included be it on the main printing or as add on components.  You just can't draw a rectangle and expect a boxcar to come out printed.

Sara is obviously very talented and I suspect patient.

Rusty

How hard is it to learn drafting?  I remember several in my high school drafting class that never really got the hang of it.  Things always look easy until you try to do it.

A lot of people do not visualize well into 3 dimensions; watching the drop out/failure rate in my sophomore chemistry class proved that to me.   More than a few laser cut kits of structures indicate to me that the same guys in that class are selling kits now.

Last edited by mwb

Ha!  I went to school to be a draftsman.  When I got out, CAD was a new thing and they were laying off draftsmen all over industry. Couldn't get a job in that field for trying. So, got a job as an apprentice machinist instead.  CAD is interesting because some things that were so simple to do with paper and pencil take hours to master in CAD, but on the other hand, some things that took a lot of figuring on a drafting table happen almost instantly when doing it on a computer.

But, anyone that wants to try it can easily download any number of free 3d CAD programs and watch some youtube lessons to get the hang of it. If it is something you decide you want to do, then deciding on your 3d program you want to stick with becomes a little more complicated.  Obviously the bigger your budget the more options you have, but professional programs bring with them a lot of functions you will never really need or use. I like using Rhino 3d because it is command driven, ala, Autocad variations, but you certainly don't even need that much power really. Best thing to do is download and install anything that is free and try to use each one to draw the same "something basic" in each one to find out which feels more comfortable to you and go from there.

3d printing is amazing.  It's not a silver bullet, and there's a lot of hype.  But it's like any other tool.  Put in the time to become proficient and it'll let you do things you couldn't do before.  Here's my example.  I really like RS-3s, but my Lionels had a very unrealistic set of tanks in the undercarriage.

The real thing looks like:

But my Lionels had a big awkward open space underneath:

So I used Fusion360 (which is free for hobbyists) to model this up:

And when printed and mounted, it looks like this:

I wouldn't have had the skills to scratchbuild that before 3d printing.  It's fun to combine hobbies!

You should be in 2 rail, and you should sell those to Lionel people everywhere.

I'll do you one better.  Here's a link to the STL files for it.  Anyone can download and print their own.

https://github.com/joelwetzel/...RS-3%20Undercarriage

It's printed in 4 parts and then glued together.  If your RS-3 is a Lionel from the past 20 years or so, then the frame is molded plastic and the undercarriage is molded into it.  This is sized perfectly to fit over and cover the existing undercarriage tanks.  (By the way, if anyone knows better terminology or what exactly all these parts are, I would love to learn more about it.)

If your Lionel RS-3 is from the 80s or 90s, those had a metal frame and the undercarriage was a plastic part screwed on.  You can take it off and replace with this.

Last edited by jwetzel1492

Sarah

You have reached the next level of 3D printing!.. printing interconnecting parts.

When making parts to fit into other parts the caution is not to make them exact.

Meaning that when you make 1/32" hole in something the male part that fits in should be less than the 1/32 hole diameter; a 1/32" diameter post will not fit into a 1/32" hole because the both dimensions are exact. Because the 3D laser printer's printing is so precise.

@Jan posted:

Sarah,

Did you use a resin printer for the domes?  They sure don't look like they were printed on a FDM printer.

Jan

Hello Jan,

yes, indeed. I use an Elegoo Saturn with water washable resin. I also own a Prusa i3 filament printer that I love to use on all constructive stuff or underframe work to repair 3-rail compromises into nice 2-rail models. Both have their pro's and con's.

We like our Saturn.  It's the printer that produced the PRR flat car I posted earlier.  I just received the MARS 3 which has better XY resolution (0.035 mm) to use to print small parts.  Still need to clear the space for it and its wash/cure stations.

Yo might try using your FDM to print the railings.  Using the filament by itself would makes a 3.3" railing.

Jan

I’d like to get a resin printer someday. I print in PLA right now. A nice trick I’ve found printing things for my locomotives: you can buy PLA filament that is 40% iron filings. It prints with a nice texture that hides layer lines. The grey naturally matches grey undercarriages. And bonus: if you put it in a saltwater bath for a few days, it will actually rust!

@jwetzel1492 posted:

I’d like to get a resin printer someday. I print in PLA right now. A nice trick I’ve found printing things for my locomotives: you can buy PLA filament that is 40% iron filings. It prints with a nice texture that hides layer lines. The grey naturally matches grey undercarriages. And bonus: if you put it in a saltwater bath for a few days, it will actually rust!

I would be extremely interested in this stuff. I'll search for some but do you know who makes it?

@Mannyrock posted:

I remember eating the Lays Potato Chips with Olestra, and being sick for 4 hours afterwards!  (They should have tested in on prisoners first.)

The Segway was going to revolutionize foot travel throughout the urban world.  The inventor actually donated the Patent to the public good.   I guess he didn't think about how many curbs there are in the world.  It could climb a curb, but it looked like a donkey trying to go up a set of stairs.

Alan, what does one of the 3D printers you are using for trains cost?

Mannyrock

Among Spanish speaking people, the Chevy Nova and the AMC Matador were marketing flops. "No va" means "it doesn't go." "Matador" means "killer."

I bet someone would be happy to.  Send them a part to duplicate and a lot of $.

Tomorrow I will meet a guy who does this stuff professionally - they produce parts stronger than previously available, and provide programs to produce parts for ships!  Some are as big as a Ford engine block, and made out of metal.  Some go in to turbine engines.

If you have to ask, you cannot afford it - yet.

@bob2 posted:

I bet someone would be happy to.  Send them a part to duplicate and a lot of $.



Why does he need a lot of money?



@c.sam I doubt my printer can do such a tiny detail but I would be happy to take a look and let you know. You might need someone with a resin printer for this because I assume it's a small ladder. We'll see! You can send me a PM or email me.

If you find someone who does this sort of thing for free or close to it, I would love to have some two axle flexicoil truck sideframes in bronze.  In fact, since I cannot find a sand foundry that is willing to consider onesies, maybe a couple of Diesel side panels in brass or aluminum?

There are folks who work for free - I am doing a Taylorcraft fuselage this week for the cost of materials.  But I get to choose the color, and will get to fly it if the owner ever assembles it after all my work is done.  But working for free for strangers or internet acquaintances - takes a pretty nice person.

@bob2 posted:

If you find someone who does this sort of thing for free or close to it, I would love to have some two axle flexicoil truck sideframes in bronze.  In fact, since I cannot find a sand foundry that is willing to consider onesies, maybe a couple of Diesel side panels in brass or aluminum?

Ah I see, so there was a misunderstanding. He asked for a 3D printed piece and it looks like you assumed he asked for cast pieces. Casting does take more work. For sure. I wish the houses were spaced out a bit more here so I could run a small backyard foundry. A lot of this stuff wouldn't be so bad to cast with the right stuff and you can just about melt enough metal in a 5 gal bucket furnace. Maybe one day.

The Cattail Foundry in Lancaster County, PA does odd job castings but I don't know how small they go. You will have to call them or send them a letter. There's no website. Benjamin King is the old owner and I think his two boys are involved now. That's the best I can do for you as far as casting small pieces in small amounts.

I know you are trying but that photo and ruler is not enough. Making a specific scale part to fit in a specific space is not that simple unless accuracy is not an issue.

If I were making that piece I would need the actual piece to then use my digital micrometer to ascertain the various dimensions in hundredths or thousands of an inch.

then I could accurately design the piece as a 3D model graphically.

AT THAT POINT, I can export the 3D model into a format for my 3D printer.

Otherwise, the model I make would be totally useless.

That is truly nice that you would do that.  3D printing comes in many flavors, including metal.  I always thought it was rather expensive, and setting up the program would be time consuming.  I admit to not knowing much about it, but am pleasantly surprised to find that neither of those things are true, at least for plastic printing.

But if you have a phone # for Cattail in Lancaster County, maybe they can do for me a couple of sides that have been sitting at an amateur foundry in that vicinity for two years.  Same foundry that had my Erie-Built sides cast in bronze - but I think he sort of lost interest.

Most of the stuff I have done is lost wax or lost plastic.  Forumites will remember I have nickel silver and bronze PAs, done by putting MTH bodies in plaster and subjecting them to intense heat, followed by injecting very hot metal.  Stevenson Preservation has a line of fully clevised side rods done with my patterns.

Metal printers can definitely run you some bucks. You're making me want to work on a small backyard foundry with all your talk of casting.

Here ya go @bob2 :

167 W Cattail Rd, Gordonville, PA 17529

717-768-7323

These guys are big into the antique machinery hobby. I'm into the hit n miss engines so that's how I found out about them. I've never dealt with them myself but I will eventually. I hear they're great to deal with. Let's hope they'll do your parts!! If you have done some casting yourself, then I bet you'll be able to talk to them and explain what you're doing. You think you'll need a milling machine to finish the parts? Make sure you report back if they'll do them! I'm sure you're not the only one on the hunt for castings.

@AlanRail posted:

HERE are 27 products that looked great but flopped.

In twenty years, 3D printing has not made the list.

1) McDonald’s Arch Deluxe

I still remember commercials on TV for the Arch Deluxe which began airing in 1996 but no amount of advertising could save this burger. It was an attempt to offer “upscale” product offerings but customers weren’t lovin’ it.

2) Ben-Gay Aspirin

Ben-Gay is a strong brand because when you hear the word “Ben-Gay”, you immediately think of pain relief cream. But that is the problem and the main reason why this aspirin product never lasted. People just didn’t like the thought of swallowing anything relating to Ben-Gay.

3) Bic Underwear

Bic is a company that is well-known for its line of disposable razors, lighters, and pens. When the company released underwear, most consumers didn’t understand why and passed.

4) Kellogg’s Breakfast Mates

More failed products that probably looked good on paper but kids just didn’t understand the packaging or its instructions. Opening a box of cereal and pouring cold fresh milk in a bowl is so much easier and Kellogg’s later realized this.

5) Cheetos Lip Balm

If you love licking your fingers after eating Cheetos, you would think this product would be great. Unfortunately, it apparently didn’t even taste like Cheetos.

6) Colgate Frozen Kitchen Entrees

Colgate may be one of the leading toothpaste brands but consumers just couldn’t comprehend buying Colgate “food”. I suppose Colgate thought that by eating a Colgate meal, people would then brush afterwards with Colgate toothpaste but it was a bad idea from the start.

7) Coors Rocky Mountain Water

While soft drink companies are successfully selling water under different brands, Coors just couldn’t do the same with it’s rocky mountain water. When consumers buy Coors water, they expect it to be fermented with barley, hops, and yeast.

8) Cosmopolitan Yogurt

Sure, yogurt is a growing product category but when you’re a company that publishes 58 editions and distributes them to more than 100 countries, then Cosmopolitan should stick to what it does best. They did try to sell their own brand of yogurt but lackluster sales caused them to pull their failed products off shelves after only 18 months.

9) Crystal Pepsi

In the 90’s, people were were obsessed with clear products. Clear soap, see-through phones, and transparent soft drinks. Pepsi jumped onto the bandwagon by offering Crystal Pepsi but it didn’t last long.

10) Microsoft Bob

27 Failed Products - Microsoft Bob.

Source Unknown

Bob’s your uncle or so Microsoft thought. Bob was released who found Windows 95 intimidating since so many new customers were purchasing computers for the first in the mid-90’s because of this this thing called the “Internet” that started getting popular around 1995. Bob was supposed to help with simple tasks but it only made things more complicated so Microsoft didn’t create future versions of the software.

11) Sony’s Betamax

Sony may have been first to market with its Betamax in 1975, but the format wars began when JVC and Matsu****a released the VHS format and video player two years later in 1977. Because VHS was a licensed standard, any company could produce video players which drove costs down but because Sony didn’t license the Betamax format, its players remained expensive.

12) Ford Edsel

Ford has had a lot of success in its 100+ year history but the Ford Edsel wasn’t a model they could call a winner. It was called the “Titanic of Automobiles” and had disappointing sales. When Ford released the Mustang in 1964, it was a huge success and anybody that still had a bad taste in their mouth about the Edsel quickly forgot about it after driving a Mustang.

13) Gerber Singles

Back in 1974, Gerber wanted to expand their line of pureed meats, vegetables, and fruits to college kids or people that were living alone for the first time. Nothing makes you feel more like an adult than eating meat mush out of a baby food jar with a spoon. Needless to say, their failed products didn’t last long on the market.

14) Harley Davidson Perfume

I know what you’re thinking. What man doesn’t want to smell like a ‘Hot Road’? It’s understandable that Harley-Davidson owners want to own everything the company makes because the brand is legendary but loyal customers had to draw the line somewhere.

15) Heinz EZ Squirt Ketchup

Ketchup is a difficult product to expand because customers are already happy with Heinz ketchup. There is only so many ways to improve ketchup but Heinz thought one way to expand the product line was by creating “mystery colors”. While kids may have enjoyed its grossness factor, it wasn’t enough for Heinz to keep it in their product line.

16) HP TouchPad

Failed products like this tablet from HP was far from being the “iPad killer” some tech magazines and websites were claiming it to be. It was based on a new operating system called webOS and had virtually no third-party support which is why retailers quickly had a fire sale to get rid of it as quickly as possible.

17) Earring Magic Ken

When Mattel decided to release a hipper version of Ken in 1993 featuring a mesh t-shirt, lavender vest, and one earring, it didn’t expect to get so much backlash. It drew criticism from the gay community for proposing false stereotypes and Mattel stopped production of the doll.

18) Life Savers Soft Drinks

Life Savers may be one of Wrigley’s most successful products and the number one brand of non-chocolate candy but as a soft drink, it tanked. Drinking liquid candy just didn’t win over consumers.

19) McDonald’s McDLT

Nobody likes soggy burgers so McDonald’s figured that if they could provide a burger that separated the cold condiments and veggies from the hot beef patty, they’d have a winner. It didn’t last long and it partly was because customers did not like having to assemble their burgers and making a mess.

20) Microsoft Zune

Microsoft released the Zune almost five years after the original iPod and couldn’t make a dent in Apple’s 65% market share in personal audio players. It was discontinued in 2011 and Microsoft encouraged users to purchase a Windows phone instead but that strategy doesn’t seem to be working either.

21) New Coke

When Coca-Cola released the “New Coke” in 1985, executives could probably hear their loyal customers around the world weeping every time they took a sip. After boycotts and protests, Coca-Cola quickly reintroduced the original Coke as “Coke Classic”.

22) Apple Newton

The Apple Newton was ahead of its time and had great features but the only problem was, most of the features didn’t work properly such as writing recognition. The product may have initially flopped but it paved the way for the Palm Pilot, BlackBerry, and eventually the iPhone (ditched the stylus!)

23) Pepsi A.M.

Cola soft drinks have caffeine and so does coffee right? Pepsi thought they could no wrong by offering a soft drink you can drink in the morning but most consumers didn’t want to drink soft drinks morning, noon, and night.

24) The Segway

The Segway is another great example of failed products that received tons of hype in the press but failed miserably when they were actually released. The company expected to sell anywhere from 50,000 to 100,000 units in its first year but it took them over two years to sell a meager 23,500 units.

25) RJ Reynolds’ Smokeless Cigarettes

These came out in 1988 and apparently “produced a smell and a flavor that left users retching”. Sounds great already! Besides the fact that they tasted horrible, rumors began circulating that they were being used by some customers as a delivery device for crack cocaine. The company quickly pulled them off the shelves.

26) Thirsty Cat! and Thirsty Dog! bottled water

In what could be considered a soft drink for pets, this daily pet drink had great flavors like Tasty Beef and Tangy Fish. While pets probably enjoyed it, pet owners didn’t see a need for feeding the pets with sugar water.

27) WOW! snack foods

Olestra is a fat substitute that was approved by the FDA in 1996 and still approved to this day. These chips may cause stomach upset, cramps, gas, and loose bowels but they’re fat free! All kidding aside, consumers just weren’t ready for snack foods with a health disclaimer on every package.

NOTHING ABOUT 3D printers.

How did I miss Harley cologne ?

Add Reply

Post
OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

www.ogaugerr.com
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×
×