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@sidehack posted:

Quietman

I also have another printer coming, the Prusa Mini. I have the MK3 already and it is great, the Mini is supposed to be as good if not better, now that they have the production problems straightened out, we will see it about the middle of January.

I spent a little more money  than I intended to on train stuff the last couple of weeks, and told my wife I'd dial back my expectations on my Christmas present. When I found the Mega S for only$220 with a 1 kg spool, it kind of made up my mind for me.

Depending on how far I go with this, a Prusa may end up being in my future.

Last edited by Quietman
@Quietman posted:

Which brings up another thread that would be useful. One on free 3D CAD / modeling software and converters.

I could see a whole array of threads, one each to share experiences with each of the major tools.

I am a journeyman FreeCad user, and would love to have a place to share experiences and skills in that platform. FreeCad is kind of a nightmare--hugely complex, constantly changing, inconsistent interfaces, and buggy. However, it is incredibly powerful and genuinely free. By this I mean, there are no strings attached forbidding commercial use, etc. Very few of the "free" systems have this property. I wanted a system that supported fully-parametric models, has no recurring license fees, was truly free of usage limitations, and runs on a Mac. FreeCad was pretty much the only choice that met all those criteria, so I bit the bullet and dug into it. I am no expert, but I have managed to become reasonably productive.  Any other FreeCad fans out there?

Last edited by Avanti
@stubbygda posted:

i will be very interested in ur experience with the mini especially with regard to mk3. i got my mini end of october and haven’t really experienced lots of the issues others had early on but still not happy with the amount of stringing it produces. it will be great to have someone to compare with especially as i am new to the 3d printer world and not sure what to expect. maybe my expectations were too high lol.  i am sure there r some prusaslicer parameters that can help i have found a few but still not happy. at least it cleans up fairly easily.

I am using 3D Solutech PETG Real Grey, Started with Prusa PETG Parameters and only made a few changes, temperture is 220/215  and bed 85/80 C and using  .15mm or .20 both Quality.

I don't have any major stringing problems, this MK3 has been running 61 day 13 hrs that's 1477 hours with no problems so if the Mini is as good and dependable I'll be pretty happy.

Ray aptly described this as a hobby within a hobby.   I am at the point where I would like to start modeling... but, where to begin?  I'm a programmer... not a CAD guy.  I'm interested in mechanical and architecture (animation/morphing/sculpting is not my thing).  I did the tutorials with TinkerCAD which gave me a primer and then a couple of tutorials with Fusion 360.  Now, which CAD program?  I installed Rhino, AutoCAD, FreeCAD, Blender and others... there are so many!   I decided that I do not want a browser based CAD program.  I do not think it matters greatly which program you use initially... the key is to get started!!!  Blender is what I'm going with.

PLEASE, Create any Topic you would like!@!

Last edited by Dennis-LaRock
@stubbygda posted:

i will be very interested in ur experience with the mini especially with regard to mk3. i got my mini end of october and haven’t really experienced lots of the issues others had early on but still not happy with the amount of stringing it produces. it will be great to have someone to compare with especially as i am new to the 3d printer world and not sure what to expect. maybe my expectations were too high lol.  i am sure there r some prusaslicer parameters that can help i have found a few but still not happy. at least it cleans up fairly easily.

I have a MK3S and get some stringing too. In my (somewhat limited) experience, it's more related to the print than the filament - lots of tall parts next to each other (individual pieces or parts of the same piece) will have stringing in between. There are some test prints and settings you can tweak to dial in your printer. However my advice is to purchase a heat gun and just hit the stringy prints with that after the print is complete. Total game changer!

Hi, glad I ran across this. I have an Ender 3 and AnyCubic Photon. I've printed pieces as small as signal heads for N scale, to pieces to construct my 4'x8' CNC machine. I've done a lot of design work in Fusion 360, some for modeling, some for real-world items.  It's awesome to see an O scale repo being put together.  I don't want to step on anyones toes, but I see two things missing, or clarifications that need to be made with these models.

The submissions in the catalog have the person's name with the picture, however there are 2 Carl's who have contributed.  So, which Carl contributed the "Block and Dwarf Signals". Might be better to keep the member usernames there.  The other thing that is missing is a readme, or a text blurb that should go in the actual repo with each model.  Again, using the "Block and Dwarf Signals", there is no citing of what he used for the post. It would be useful to ask for such information since the model heavily depends on what piece was used there.

Other submissions such as the Bidirectional Signal by Alan, is a single STL. It probably should be broken up into separate components for printing, or a STEP file, rather than an STL should be provided so a user can perform more manipulation to split it apart themselves.  It was also seem that parts of that model could only be printed using a resin printer, based on how the parts and orientations are, using the arm with signal head attached as an example.

I'd make sure as people submit models that they have to describe how it's printed (if it's not obvious), and what other components must be used if they aren't included in the STL packages themselves.

If you need any help, feel free to reach out, I do the 3d printing and design stuff in my spare time, but Linux admin on servers, and web design is my primary job function these days.

@AlanRail posted:

Alan Here: I did break up the signal into parts; never used .step files though perhaps I should?

Hi Alan, I like the part, but the one on the server is a single STL with all the pieces floating in it.  The biggest difference between the STL and STEP is that the STL is basically defines the vertices and surfaces and doesn’t understand the actual geometry , not something that can be edited (easily). A STEP file will define the actual geometry, how it relates and allow it to be pulled apart, remixed, or whatever in programs like Fusion 360 or whatever. Easier than supplying the actual CAD file.

We have encouraged folks to include .stp files with their .stl(s) both in posts in threads and in the *Best Practices* .doc which is in the Repository along side the Catalog.  There are 98 .stp files in the Repository with their associated .stl(s).  We certainly haven't deleted or discouraged anyone from providing STEP files.

Please!!!  By all means, provide STEP(s) with your .STL(s)... they are Welcomed and Encouraged!!!

The easier that we can make this for the end user... especially for the beginner ...the better.  We are all teachers.  The best we can do for our hobby is share our experiences and knowledge.

STEP/.stp:  STEP is a file extension for a 3-D graphic file used by CAD software. STP stands for Standard for the Exchange of Product model data. STP files are used to store 3D image data in an ASCII format, following the standards defined in ISO 10303-21 : Clear Text Encoding of the Exchange Structure.

Last edited by Dennis-LaRock

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