3RS Legacy B6

The beauty of the video is it's totality. By that I mean the smallest details attract, rather than detract from, the scenes. Look at the planning that went into all the peripheral details. I love that.

Passengers will please refrain, This train's got the disappearin' railroad blues...

Norm, all I can say is WOW to your creative genius, and great videography...I recommend everyone take a good look at your videos as your attention to detail is fantastic. I plan to have an evening watching your handiwork....Thanks so much. This is truly 3 rail scale.

Great thread, beautiful work, Norm.  I was thinking it couldn't get any better and then 645 posted the picture of 5244 in Camden with two PRSL Baldwin AS16 locomotives in the background (looks like #6009 on the right).  Between the Union Transportation connection (the New Egypt facility was a beaut with a small turntable and engine house on the line beyond Fort Dix) and the Camden shot, it's really good stuff. 

TM Terry posted:

What is the function of the small car trailing the B6, about the size of a truck?

That is a Scale Test car. In order to verify the accuracy of railroad car scales, a known weight is placed on the scale to calibrate/certify the accuracy of the scale. Thus, those Scale Test cars do NOT even have brakes, as the brake shoes would wear and change the weight of the test car. Thus those Scale Test cars were/are normally carried on the rear of a train, since they have no brakes.

Thanks for the info HW. I will drag it at the end of a train next time I take it for a ride. I just noticed it has stenciled instructions for hauling at the rear of a train. Did not know about its lack of air brakes. It does have a brake wheel though, I suppose it has manual brakes?

Hot Water posted:
TM Terry posted:

What is the function of the small car trailing the B6, about the size of a truck?

That is a Scale Test car. In order to verify the accuracy of railroad car scales, a known weight is placed on the scale to calibrate/certify the accuracy of the scale. Thus, those Scale Test cars do NOT even have brakes, as the brake shoes would wear and change the weight of the test car. Thus those Scale Test cars were/are normally carried on the rear of a train, since they have no brakes.

Scale test cars were not run on a railroad because wheel wear, etc. would affect its mass. They were hauled on a flat car and unloaded at scales. So, you gotta make up a flat car to transport your test car.

rex desilets posted:
Hot Water posted:
TM Terry posted:

What is the function of the small car trailing the B6, about the size of a truck?

That is a Scale Test car. In order to verify the accuracy of railroad car scales, a known weight is placed on the scale to calibrate/certify the accuracy of the scale. Thus, those Scale Test cars do NOT even have brakes, as the brake shoes would wear and change the weight of the test car. Thus those Scale Test cars were/are normally carried on the rear of a train, since they have no brakes.

Scale test cars were not run on a railroad because wheel wear, etc. would affect its mass. They were hauled on a flat car and unloaded at scales. So, you gotta make up a flat car to transport your test car.

Totally NOT TRUE!  Scale test cars were NOT carried on flat cars, as they would have been way to difficult to unload. Over my more that 50 years in the railroad business, I have seen many, many, many Scale Test cars handled on the rear of freight trains, and NEVER transported on a flat car.

Clearly I didn't know what the car was. But considering an effort to minimize size (volume), I would think that lead would make a good weight. Plates or balls would make easy weight adjustment for calibrating the scale car desired weight.

Specifically appropriate for Norm's operations, from the Pennsylvania Railroad Book of Rules:

EFFECTIVE OCTOBER 28, 1956



  • Test Weight Cars 
    4155-I. A test weight car is a car used for testing railroad track scales.

    Test weight cars should be handled at rear of train just ahead of cabin car.

    Non-truck, 4-wheel type cars must not be placed between pusher engine and other cars in yard or road movements, and must not be moved at speeds greater than 30 miles per hour. Scale inspectors or other employes issuing shipping instructions for test weight cars of 4-wheel type will indicate in such instructions the correct speed to which the movement is restricted. Agents, yard masters and car inspectors must see that form C.T. 213 is endorsed to show such speed restrictions and that the Superintendent Transportation is notified.

    Test weight cars must be handled carefully to avoid impact at speeds greater than 2 miles per hour. Brakes on cars uncoupled from other equipment in motion must be manned and carefully operated to prevent excessive speeds, and must be firmly set when movement is stopped. When handling such cars, conductors must know that enginemen have been so advised. (Rev. 5-1-60)

 

Tom

 

Add Reply



OGR Publishing, Inc.
33 Sheridan Road, Poland, OH 44514
330-757-3020

www.ogaugerr.com
×
×
×
×
×