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I went to replace the brushes on my 3115 from my Merchant set and noticed someone had used cotter pins to hold the brushes and springs in place and soldered the wire to the cotter pin. I thought it was weird until I looked at another 3115 project motor I have and it has the same exact setup.  I've switched out brushes in 15-20 Flyer O and Wide gauge motors and these are the first two examples I've seen of this, has anyone else seen this before? Is this normal?

    Jon

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I have seen that as one of the many ways of holding the brushes and springs in place on Flyer prewar motors.  It is more common to find on one side of the engines that did not have reverse, as the cotter pin would hold a larger diameter spring to ground that side of the armature to the frame, but I seem to recall seeing it on both sides, similar to your engine.

As your engine has been worked on before (to replace the wheels) it is possible that the person who replaced the wheels added the cotter pins at that time. 

Last edited by Nation Wide Lines

I have seen that as one of the many ways of holding the brushes and springs in place on Flyer prewar motors.  It is more common to find on one side of the engines that did not have reverse, as the cotter pin would hold a larger diameter spring to ground that side of the armature to the frame, but I seem to recall seeing it on both sides, similar to your engine.

As your engine has been worked on before (to replace the wheels) it is possible that the person who replaced the wheels added the cotter pins at that time.

I thought that might be the case but it threw me off when I saw another 3115 motor with the same style repair. Another quick question, should the two headlights turn on and of based on how which way the reversing switch is positioned? It looks like since the reverse headlight was missing they wired the front headlight to the pickup plate.

     Jon

The O gauge Flyer engine headlights are typically wired directly to the pick-up plate and both are lighted at the same time.  The only O gauge engines I have seen differently are the ones with the early automatic reverse.

Typically, the power came off of the pick-up plate by a single wire and then there was a split somewhere outside of the motor frame that went to each headlight.

The O gauge Flyer engine headlights are typically wired directly to the pick-up plate and both are lighted at the same time.  The only O gauge engines I have seen differently are the ones with the early automatic reverse.

Typically, the power came off of the pick-up plate by a single wire and then there was a split somewhere outside of the motor frame that went to each headlight.

Ditto.  And typically they used the brush wire, threaded through the holes in the brush tube and bent back around the tube to hold the brushes /springs in.

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OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

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