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Peter,

Is there a Putman Bridge on your Putman Division ?  The Putnam Bridge was a swing bridge that spanned the Harlem River and the adjacent tracks of the New York Central Railroad in New York City. The bridge connected Harlem in Manhattan to Concourse, near the current location of Yankee Stadium, in the Bronx. It carried two tracks of the New York and Putnam Railroad, and later the 9th Avenue elevated line of the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT), as well as two pedestrian walkways outside the superstructure.

Putnam Bridge.jpg

By 1894 it was reorganized as the New York & Putnam Railroad (NY&P) by J. P. Morgan who in turned leased the railroad to the New York Central & Hudson River Railroad (NYC&HR).[1] The line eventually became the Putnam Division of the New York Central Railroad (NYC) by 1913. The line lacked a direct connection to NYC's flagship station, Grand Central Terminal (GCT), which hurt ridership throughout its existence. Passengers were forced to transfer at Highbridge to reach GCT.

Peter - Look like I just learned something about your layout.

In my opinion, New York City exemplifies the best and most worthy things that human beings can be and create. Education, arts, sports, medicine, architecture, parks, transportation (railroads, subways, airports), libraries, business, food, restaurants, infrastructure (have a look at the skyscrapers, bridges and tunnels) and promotion of civility and respect among all its people. I moved away a long time ago because life took me elsewhere, but I often return to keep an eye on things...

MELGAR

Last edited by MELGAR
@Will posted:

If you drive in on 80 you will pass a few miles by my house. I cross 80 or use it almost every day. I'm right near the Delaware Water Gap.

Small world Will, I'm near the Water Gap too.

@Mark Boyce posted:

I’ve never been out that far east.  Photographs of the Delaware Water Gap look beautiful.

Mark, if you make the trip out east, the Water Gap and surrounding areas are fantastic. If you come to the Jersey side, you can see the old DL&W Delaware and Paulinskill viaducts. NJT is planning to use them in their plans to re-build the Lackawanna Cut-off

Bryce

@MELGAR posted:

In my opinion, New York City exemplifies the best and most worthy things that human beings can be and create. Education, arts, sports, medicine, architecture, parks, transportation (railroads, subways, airports), libraries, business, food, restaurants, infrastructure (have a look at the skyscrapers, bridges and tunnels) and promotion of civility and respect among all its people. I moved away a long time ago because life took me elsewhere, but I often return to keep an eye on things...

MELGAR

A little off the topic (but not much), in terms of civility and so forth, O Henry wrote a short story set around the turn of the 20th century. In the story someone who moved to the town finds the town cold,people unfriendly, and is thinking of going home. He gets hit by a horse drawn cab, and suddenly there is a crowd of people around him helping, making sure he is okay, etc. A cop shows up and asks him where he is from, and he says proudly "I am a New Yawker".

Small world Will, I'm near the Water Gap too.

Mark, if you make the trip out east, the Water Gap and surrounding areas are fantastic. If you come to the Jersey side, you can see the old DL&W Delaware and Paulinskill viaducts. NJT is planning to use them in their plans to re-build the Lackawanna Cut-off

Bryce

Thank you, Bryce!!  Sounds great; like my kind of place! 😊

@shorling posted:

Peter,

Is there a Putman Bridge on your Putman Division ?  The Putnam Bridge was a swing bridge that spanned the Harlem River and the adjacent tracks of the New York Central Railroad in New York City. The bridge connected Harlem in Manhattan to Concourse, near the current location of Yankee Stadium, in the Bronx. It carried two tracks of the New York and Putnam Railroad, and later the 9th Avenue elevated line of the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT), as well as two pedestrian walkways outside the superstructure.

Putnam Bridge.jpg

By 1894 it was reorganized as the New York & Putnam Railroad (NY&P) by J. P. Morgan who in turned leased the railroad to the New York Central & Hudson River Railroad (NYC&HR).[1] The line eventually became the Putnam Division of the New York Central Railroad (NYC) by 1913. The line lacked a direct connection to NYC's flagship station, Grand Central Terminal (GCT), which hurt ridership throughout its existence. Passengers were forced to transfer at Highbridge to reach GCT.

Peter - Look like I just learned something about your layout.

Well, Steve, if the Putnam Division has got you interested......these are good books to read.....

My two favorites are the ones on the Left.

The 3 volume Putnam Division series on the right is by a man named Joe Schiavone. Sadly, he has passed but if you search his name on You Tube: Walk the Put with Joe Schiavone....he will lead you on some great walks of the Putnam ROW which is now a rail trail.

You'll also meet two Forum members on some of those walks: New York Central Fan and MNCR.

1644AF17-4352-41B8-ACEF-84AAAE6FB188

Peter

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I have been in contact with the Bohack family about our new Bohack reefer  Mr H.C. Bohacks daughter Jackie sent me this pic and gave permission to use it.   They were a treasure trove of info and were the ones that knew Ballantine was the brewer of Bohack Beer      This was New Yorks supermarket   And this is New Yorks Supermarket's mother ship

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