Danr posted:

Paul, thanks for the picture of the car interior.  Nice work on your layout.  I have that same Lifesaver sign.  I drove past the Lifesaver building a number of times.

IMG_0158

I found some pictures of it when it was the Lifesaver building and at least at some point it had the "giant" tubes of lifesavers on the lawn in front of the building and wrapping around it. That's why I decided to put my sign on the ground in some bushes. I don't recall if the tubes on the ground level were illuminated or not but I decided to put the sign at ground level.

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Paul

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eddie g posted:

My father took the NYNH&H from New Rochelle to Grand Central every weekday from 1930 to 1944. They would turn the seat around and play bridge every day.

My father took New Haven/Metro North to GCT every day from Stamford Station (and sometimes the Springdale Spur) from the early 70's through the late 80's. His company moved out of NYC and on to Long Island in the late 80's which meant he had to drive it instead. 

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Paul

Here is a picture of an Osgood-Bradley car with the interior painted green.  It looked darker on the bench but looks lighter under the LED's in the car.  Does this look like the color they were or should it be darker?

IMG_0161

Dan

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I think the color was much darker. Like a forest green or something. Again, just my memory which could be inaccurate. They also could have started that color and then after 50 years of smoke and whatever wore them down to a much darker green.

Danr posted:

Here is a picture of an Osgood-Bradley car with the interior painted green.  It looked darker on the bench but looks lighter under the LED's in the car.  Does this look like the color they were or should it be darker?

IMG_0161

 

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Paul

Danr posted:

Here is a picture of an Osgood-Bradley car with the interior painted green.  It looked darker on the bench but looks lighter under the LED's in the car.  Does this look like the color they were or should it be darker?

IMG_0161

Dan,

Volume 32 Issue 3 of "Shoreliner," the magazine of the New Haven Railroad Historical and Technical Association (nhrhta.org), has an article about the Osgood Bradley lightweight passenger cars. As built during the 1930s, the article states that "the seats were upholstered in a dark blue, checkered pattern, mohair plush." Color and black/white photographs in the article also show a dark color. During the 1950s, there was a car refurbishment program about which the article says "the coach seats .... are re-dyed a deep blue." A black/white photograph confirms the dark color. Having said that, the Weaver Models O scale New Haven Railroad American Flyer cars (with Hunter Green exteriors) have light grey interiors.

MELGAR

Deep blue    Fortunately, these things are held together with about 20 screws and the entire interior comes out for painting.  I have two of these cars,  The second one is apart but I haven't done anything yet.  Not sure that I have a deep blue in stock.  I'll post a picture after the next try.

Thanks

Dan

Danr posted:

Deep blue    Fortunately, these things are held together with about 20 screws and the entire interior comes out for painting.  I have two of these cars,  The second one is apart but I haven't done anything yet.  Not sure that I have a deep blue in stock.  I'll post a picture after the next try.

If you go to the website of the historical association (nhrhta.org) and click on "back in stock," you can scroll through a list of "Shoreliners" that are still available for purchase, including the one with the relevant article. I think it would be useful for you.

MELGAR

Danr posted:

Deep blue    Fortunately, these things are held together with about 20 screws and the entire interior comes out for painting.  I have two of these cars,  The second one is apart but I haven't done anything yet.  Not sure that I have a deep blue in stock.  I'll post a picture after the next try.

Thanks

Sorry if I led you astray. At least you're going from light green to dark blue which is probably easier than the other way around!

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Paul

My K-Line Jet converted to two-rail:

102_0120102_0121

Unlike the prototype, this one has all axles powered:

102_0128102_0129

 

I also have three K-Line 21" NH passenger cars that have been two-railed.

Later Gator,

  Dave

 

Here comes a Yankee with a blackened soul,
Heading to Gatow with a load of coal.
......Anonymous U. S. pilot during the Berlin Airlift

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MELGAR posted:

Some of my favorite New Haven locomotives. I commend MTH for having made such outstanding models.

EP3 353

MELGAR_NHRR_04_EP3_353

MELGAR

Beautiful engines, MELGAR. Now for one of my classic dumb questions... do you know what the purpose of the “sun porch” on the front of the engine is???

Thanks.

Paul

Techno-Peasant of the First Order

Provisionary Member - Brotherhood of the Crappy Basement Layout

 TCA 15-70689

LCCA RM-39621

LOTS RM-9326

Apples55 posted:
MELGAR posted:

Some of my favorite New Haven locomotives. I commend MTH for having made such outstanding models.

EP3 353

MELGAR_NHRR_04_EP3_353

MELGAR

Beautiful engines, MELGAR. Now for one of my classic dumb questions... do you know what the purpose of the “sun porch” on the front of the engine is???

This answer is somewhat conjectural on my part...

The locomotive length was determined by the need for six axles to mount the motors and produce the tractive force, plus the front and rear two-axle trucks to assist in steering and tracking. The box cab was shorter because a shorter length was sufficient to enclose the necessary machinery, transformers and cabs. The porches were structural members mounted to the front and rear trucks and carried tracking forces into the locomotive frame (and possibly into the six-axle trucks) while also supporting some of the engine weight.

MELGAR

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