any New Haven fans ....

briansilvermustang posted:

During the 1950s, New Haven managements allowed their electric locomotives to deteriorate and began to use FL-9 diesels to pull freight trains under wires that had to remain electrified for passenger service into New York City. After declaring bankruptcy in 1961, the trustees realized they needed new electric freight locomotives and, in 1963, they acquired 12 nearly new electric locomotives from the Norfolk & Western’s Virginian Railway at the bargain price of $300,000 total. These 3,300 HP motors, designated EF-4, and numbered #300-310, were known as “bricks” on the New Haven and usually ran in pairs. They utilized 11,000-volt AC power and converted it to DC for the traction motors, like the New Haven’s EP-5 passenger electrics. They ran between Cedar Hill (New Haven) and Bay Ridge (Brooklyn) and lasted until the Penn Central takeover in 1969, when they became PC Class E-33 and were removed from New Haven territory. They became Conrail property in 1976 and ran until 1981.

MELGAR

MELGAR_NHRR_EF4_303

 

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MELGAR posted:
Apples55 posted:
briansilvermustang posted:

Kind of a dumb question, but the New Haven is the only road I have noticed that will put a leading zero in front of a three digit engine number. Does that zero signify anything???

When the New Haven Railroad began to buy diesels, they prefixed the diesel road numbers with a "zero" to indicate that the locomotive was "0ther" than steam. After all steam engines had been retired, the zeros were removed.

MELGAR 

Thanks MELGAR. You are a treasure trove of fascinating info.

Paul

Techno-Peasant of the First Order

Provisionary Member - Brotherhood of the Crappy Basement Layout

 

A correction to my earlier post:

The New Haven Railroad began the practice of having a "zero" prefix on the road numbers of its electric locomotives in 1906, when it was building its AC electrification between Woodlawn, New York and Stamford, Connecticut. The zero indicated that the locomotive was "0ther" than steam. This numbering also applied to New Haven diesel locomotives beginning in 1931 and lasted until steam engines were retired from the railroad in the 1950s. 

MELGAR 

MELGAR posted:

A correction to my earlier post:

The New Haven Railroad began the practice of having a "zero" prefix on the road numbers of its electric locomotives in 1906, when it was building its AC electrification between Woodlawn, New York and Stamford, Connecticut. The zero indicated that the locomotive was "0ther" than steam. This numbering also applied to New Haven diesel locomotives beginning in 1931 and lasted until steam engines were retired from the railroad in the 1950s. 

MELGAR 

Thanks for the additional info, MELGAR... You're still a treasure trove   

Paul

Techno-Peasant of the First Order

Provisionary Member - Brotherhood of the Crappy Basement Layout

 

Putnam Division posted:

WOW! A great topic. I grew up near the New Haven line in the northeast Bronx that eventually crossed the HellGate bridge.

My paternal grandparents lived in Larchmont just north and west of the station. I grew up watching McGinnis-liveried jets go flying by! I could get up close before I-95 was built.....

Of course, in 1958, I asked Santa to bring me the New Haven F3 freight set in the Lionel catalog.

This is my office computer, so I don't have a lot of pics here....this is what I have:

jet 4jet 6jet3jett01jett02

NH F unit

My DL 109-110 with PS3:

003

My EP-5 set from the 56 Lionel catalog:

004

My F3 set from the 58 Lionel catalog:

Layout51Sept2002 007

I grew up in Mt. Vernon, NY, and the New Haven Line ran through the heart of the City. Great pictures; they bring back fond memories. I often rode those NH trains with my mother, who took me with her to go shopping in NYC.

When I was a kid, a hardware store in Mt. Vernon, Telly Hardware, sold Lionel Trains. My Dad took me there when I was about 10 or 11 years old. They had a Lionel EP5 that I most wanted, but it was a little too expensive, so my Dad bought me a B&O center cab 44 ton Lionel Diesel, a very nice peppy engine made in the late 50s, which I still have and run on my layout. 

I'm sure what I am about to say applies to many of us. Forty years later, I go to a train show, see that Lionel post-war NH EP5, and made it mine. I think I especially love it now because I could not have it when I was a kid.

In my little world, I leave this troubled world behind.

Putnam Division posted:

WOW! A great topic. I grew up near the New Haven line in the northeast Bronx that eventually crossed the HellGate bridge.

My paternal grandparents lived in Larchmont just north and west of the station. I grew up watching McGinnis-liveried jets go flying by! I could get up close before I-95 was built.....

Of course, in 1958, I asked Santa to bring me the New Haven F3 freight set in the Lionel catalog.

This is my office computer, so I don't have a lot of pics here....this is what I have:

jet 4jet 6jet3jett01jett02

NH F unit

My DL 109-110 with PS3:

003

My EP-5 set from the 56 Lionel catalog:

004

My F3 set from the 58 Lionel catalog:

Layout51Sept2002 007

I grew up in Mt. Vernon, NY, and the New Haven Line ran through the heart of the City. Great pictures; they bring back fond memories. I often rode those NH trains with my mother, who took me with her to go shopping in NYC.

When I was a kid, a hardware store in Mt. Vernon, Telly Hardware, sold Lionel Trains. My Dad took me there when I was about 10 or 11 years old. They had a Lionel EP5 that I most wanted, but it was a little too expensive, so my Dad bought me a B&O center cab 44 ton Lionel Diesel, a very nice peppy engine made in the late 50s, which I still have and run on my layout. 

I'm sure what I am about to say applies to many of us. Forty years later, I go to a train show, see that Lionel post-war NH EP5, and made it mine. I think I especially love it now because I could not have it when I was a kid.

In my little world, I leave this troubled world behind.

The first Acela train in the morning leaves Providence, RI at 5:40am and will get you to NYC about 3 hours later.  This is useful, because you can get there comfortably in time for a 10am meeting pretty much anywhere in Manhattan.  One of my favorite things to do on that train is sit on the left side of the train (water side) and watch the sunrise over Westerly, RI and Stonington, CT.

The five photos below were taken from inside an Amtrak train running along the Northeast corridor in a few Connecticut shore towns such as Old Lyme, Madison, Noank, etc.  These were taken on the second train out of Providence which leaves at around 6:50am.  I was on my way down from Rhode Island to attend the Fall TCA York meet, so the pictures are that much more special for me.

The first two show just how close the tracks are to the water's edge.  Believe it or not, these are further away than some spots where the right of way is literally 10-20 feet from the water.

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The promenade, fencing, and benches along this stretch are somewhat new, having been added to this beach in the past few years.

The next image shows one of the many small salt marshes in the Madison, CT. area.  If I had had my thinking cap on, I would have taken a photo of one of the half dozen or so gated grade crossings through this area.  It's hard to believe that the Acela still passes by several roads that are only protected by crossing gates.

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The final two photos show another stretch of beach from the train window.  These photos are kind of hard to capture because you need to time your shots to miss the overhead wire stanchions as they pass by the windows.  You have to sit there and get into a groove of 1-2-3-click!, 1-2-3-click! as the train passes the stanchions.

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Whenever you take the train from NYC to New England, remember to sit on the right going north and the left side going south for the best water views.

Steven J. Serenska

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Great photos, Steve! It is a very scenic ride along what once was the New Haven Railroad. I often ride Shoreline East from New Haven to New London, just to enjoy the views...

And likewise it was great to meet Don Masso at today's show in Cheshire, CT.

MELGAR

It's 2 weeks before Christmas, 1957 and time to do some last minute shopping at Macy's in NYC. Before we board the New Haven in downtown Mt. Vernon, my mother and I stop at the Beehive for the best brunch money can buy including a milk shake served in the big old fashioned tin (that means 2 milkshakes for the price of one).

After brunch, got to run to catch that New Haven Train in the pictures below imageimageimageimageso we can buy more Lionel trains at Macy's. 

In my little world, I leave this troubled world behind.

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Ran this last night after servicing a GG1. Oiled and greased it for the first time in over 15 years. I'll take Bosch purple grease over Red&Tacky any day - 15+years service life! Anyway here's the "Merchants Ltd" pulling in for a mail stop. Now i need a favor. Running 042 curves,P1010340P1010342P1010339P1010341 full scale equipment just doesn't look right. Hence i've decided to build my own EP3 "Flat Bottom" on a spare K-Line GG1 chassis out of a combination of brass and styrene. Does anyone have any photos showing the roof top details. At this point i'm thinking of building the roof out of wood with .010" styrene laminated over it unless i can find someone to make me a 3D file to have it printed in 3D.

jackson, CEO, Not-So-Great Eastern RR, aka The Never Done Line

          Division of the Southern Adirondack Railway Cartel

 

 

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Check the motor height on that K line GG1 - I wanted to do an EP4 on a Williams GG1 - the older ones have pretty tall motors (but I think the recent ones have much smaller motors - I may be back in business). Was gonna rig something up using either a modified EP5 shell from a lionel or hack up some F3 shells. The nose/window height on the EP4 is tighter than the F units - wasn't sure exactly how to work that. Maybe 3D print.

Jim

Jim Waterman - Lee Lines Limited

Custom Made Standard Gauge Trains

Jim, Funny you should mention that. As i was doing some preliminary measurements and making the first of several cardboard mock-ups, i was using the aforementioned GG1, an older Williams one, that was on one of my benches for service to get some measurements. Motor height was clearly going to be a problem.  I then pulled a K-Line one out of the box and happily discovered it has smaller motors.

jackson, CEO, Not-So-Great Eastern RR, aka The Never Done Line

          Division of the Southern Adirondack Railway Cartel

 

 

Metro-North #231 is a GE P32AC-DM locomotive painted in the New Haven’s McGinnis color scheme. Like the FL-9s they replaced, the P32s are dual-mode diesel-electrics which can also operate on third-rail DC electric power for operation into Grand Central Terminal. Metro-North’s 231 examples were purchased between 1995 and 1998 and have 3200 HP. #231 is owned by the Connecticut Department of Transportation and was photographed at Danbury, CT on June 1, 2017.

MELGAR

MELGAR_METRO-NORTH_231_DRM

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Traindame posted:

Traingineers are modeling a New Haven Station for one of our Traintastic Customers... moving right along!

IMG_1422

Happy Tracks!
TrainDame aka Dorcie Farkash
TW TrainWorx
Dallas, TX | Concord, NC USA
(214) 634-2965
www.trainworxlayouts.com 

It appears that the model is a compressed version of the New Haven, CT station.  I took these photos in 2009.  Please post photos of the finished model.  NH Joe

This is a photo of a picture that is inside the station.  This picture was taken shortly after the station was built.

DSCN4079

 

Trackside in 2009.

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Street side in 2009.

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New Haven Station, built in 1920, is a beautiful station any way you look at it. It is more than worthy of its listing on the National Register of Historic Places. Note Metro-North and New Haven Railroad O-Gauge model trains in third photo.

MELGAR

MELGAR_NEW_HAVEN_STATION_1MELGAR_NEW_HAVEN_STATION_2MELGAR_NEW_HAVEN_STATION_3

 

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Here are more photos that I took of the New Haven, CT station while I attended the 2009 Hartford National NMRA Convention. NH Joe

Main waiting room.  The bench backs have O gauge MTH models of NH trains in enclosed glass or plexiglass cases on the top.  

DSCN4062

This is a close up of the chandelier.  They have been beautifully restored.

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This the restored ceiling.  

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Another view of waiting room.  I really like the flag.

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An Amtrak train is ready to depart.  Note the NH on the passenger car.

 

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View of the passenger platforms.

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This is the station's yard throat at the the West (New York) end of the station.  The NH mainline from New York to Boston runs mostly West to East along Long Island Sound.  I always get confused because I think of Boston as being North of New York but it is really Northeast of New York with most of the distance being to the East.  

DSCN4086

This is the NH motor storage yard next to station.  The NH railroad called their electric engines "motors".  Amtrak evidently uses the yard to store diesels and electric engines.  

DSCN4097

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Traindame posted:

Traingineers are modeling a New Haven Station for one of our Traintastic Customers... moving right along!IMG_1422

Happy Tracks!
TrainDame aka Dorcie Farkash
TW TrainWorx
Dallas, TX | Concord, NC USA
(214) 634-2965
www.trainworxlayouts.com 

Darcie;

That is spectacular. Can't wait to see the completed station.

Paul

Techno-Peasant of the First Order

Provisionary Member - Brotherhood of the Crappy Basement Layout

 

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