Am considering using this to darken wheels and drive rods on steam loco and FasTrack rails.

Any advice on its use? Where to OR not to use it? Is it permanent? Scratch and rub off resistant? Will oil or grease effect it? Does it have a shiny or dull appearance? Can objects be made progressively darker with multiple coats? Does it brush on smoothly and evenly leaving no brush marks? Drying time? If I'm unhappy with its results, can it be removed without permanently altering original finish or objects it was applied to? Any electrical or insulating issues I should be concerned about in connection with its use? All suggestions, hints, etc. about it are most welcome. Thanks.

ogaugeguy

LCCA


 




Original Post

Here are some threads that may help. I've been thinking it might be nice stuff.

 

The only thing I dont see mentioned is the stuff tested/certified for nuclear reactor use is way more expensive.

 

https://ogrforum.ogaugerr.com/t...67#41694216342139867

 

  https://ogrforum.ogaugerr.com/t...83#42398304114341183

 

https://ogrforum.ogaugerr.com/topic/darkening-metal  

 

https://ogrforum.ogaugerr.com/t...45#10299794814697145

"Still trying to not shoot my eye out"

 

"Nursing insomnia one railcar at a time"

My aroma therapy? Smoke Pellets.

 





Neolube really is a lubricant, so I'd be careful about putting it on rails or wheel treads.

I have not used it to blacken. I have used it as a lubricant.

It seems to be mixed in some sort of shellac base (site says "thermoplastic resin"), so it can stick things together. (or maybe I'm just lucky).

I only use it once in a very great while.

C.W. Burfle
Originally Posted by C W Burfle:

Neolube really is a lubricant, so I'd be careful about putting it on rails or wheel treads.

I have not used it to blacken. I have used it as a lubricant.

It seems to be mixed in some sort of shellac base (site says "thermoplastic resin"), so it can stick things together. (or maybe I'm just lucky).

I only use it once in a very great while.

Right.  Maybe he is thinking of "Blacken It".

I have used Neolube quite a bit,  it is conductive as stated above.  I have used it on the external wheels and drive.  Never used it on anything when the engine is taken apart.   

 

I have used it for two reasons stated above also,  darkening the drivers and the lubricating qualities.  Never any issues,  great product.   If you stay away from touching it,  generally,  it stays in place for years.    I have a J 4-8-4 that has had it on the drivers for about 5 years now,  no degradation.

 

If you choose to put more on,  it blends right in nicely.   typically Alcohol is the agent that applies the lube and quickly evaporates.  I blow on it and it disappears in a matter of seconds. 

 

Personally,  I did not want anything permanent and this can be removed so a good solution for my preferences.

 

Mark

 

I have used it on rods and drivers.    It darkens them, but does make them black.   It does dry to a fairly flat finish.      It makes the shine go away but does not necessarily go on with a uniform coat.   To me it looks like carbon steel that has been cleaned and maintained.

 

It does rub off if handled.

 

And it is a conductive lubricant.   I think basically graphite in an alcohol base.

 

I like if very much for the rod and driver applications.   

Originally Posted by AMCDave:

Great example Dave,   really shows the impact of Neolube.  Such an easy improvement if you prefer a more realstic look.

 

Mark

 

 

I use it...I like it.....it will rub off some if handled much....but I don't touch my drivers much.....

 

PRRHIPPO1

PRRHIPPO4

 

I've used it as a blackening agent. Looks really nice, bit tedious to apply. Haven't used it in years. My bottle went astray and I don't know where it is (probably evaporated, anyway).

 

Yes, it is graphite in alcohol. Rubs off, but so do chalks and dry pigments.

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