Gilly, I have to admit that scrapple was another new experience, I was a farm kid and we ate many a combined meat scraps meal, but when my future Father in Law placed a plate of scrapple eggs and toast in front of me, it was with trepidation I ate it, not wanting to offend my girlfriend or him. To my surprise, it was very good and has become a staple in the last 41 years. Basha's actually carries it, and I am hoping Kroger's brings it into Fry's.

 

Wild Mary,  Steam spiced blue crabs was another new experience. Growing up in the NW, we ate a lot of Dungeness crab and King crab, but it was served steamed with drawn butter. The first time that brown bag with a bushel of crabs was tossed on the newspaper strewn tabletop, I wondered what sort of strange society I was getting married into. Then the cap was popped on a cold brew, not Natty Boh, and my future wife showed me how to pick a blue jimmy.  Needless to say, I was hooked and have become a lifelong member of Old Bay!!  We buy a case every few years and use it to spice most of the seafood we serve at BBQ's and dinners for friends and family.

Natty Boh beer seems to almost have a "cultish" following, in the very best sense of that term! Reminds me of the fascination with Coors and Anchor Steam in the 1970's before they were more widely distributed in the states.

Last edited by Tinplate Art

Anchor Steam was an ale/beer hybrid fermented at a higher temperature than most lagers and was rescued by entrepreneur, Fritz Maytag (cheese, not washer fame). It was initially only available on the west coast. Coors, of course, was only available in Colorado and adjacent western states. It somehow acquired a largely undeserved  inflated reputation, and was famously smuggled to other parts of the country before it was eventually nationally distributed. With Coors, it was genuinely believed the spring water supply in Golden, CO somehow made it a better beer. After these beers were both available in all fifty states, the cult status eventually died off.

Last edited by Tinplate Art

Of the two, Anchor Steam was a better product and its brewery was a forerunner of today's so-called "boutique" or "craft" breweries. Another beer that had a well deserved cult following in the 1970's was the truly great Czech beer, Pilsner Urquell. Unfortunately, due to the green glass bottles and in the days before cold shipping, it sometimes suffered from UV degradation resulting in a "skunky" taste and odor! Today's Pilsner Urquel comes in proper brown bottles and is cold shipped from Pilsen, and remains one of the top rated European beers.

Last edited by Tinplate Art

Anchor Steam was an ale/beer hybrid fermented at a higher temperature than most lagers and was rescued by entrepreneur, Fritz Maytag (cheese, not washer fame). It was initially only available on the west coast. Coors, of course, was only available in Colorado and adjacent western states. It somehow acquired a largely undeserved  inflated reputation, and was famously smuggled to other parts of the country before it was eventually nationally distributed. With Coors, it was genuinely believed the spring water supply in Golden, CO somehow made it a better beer. After these beers were both available in all fifty states, the cult status eventually died off.

LOL! In 2019, Coors Light was #2 in sales in the US to Bud Light and Coors Banquet was #22. Appears the "cult" has not died out.

Pat 

Natty Boh beer seems to almost have a "cultish" following, in the very best sense of that term! Reminds me of the fascination with Coors and Anchor Steam in the 1970's before they were more widely distributed in the states.

Boy, do you have that right with Coors. Quite a mystery to us Easterners at one time

True story: In the early 70s, a liquor store in Washington, D.C. ran an ad in the Sports section of the Washington Post saying a refrigerated 18 wheeler would be bringing a full load of Coors to their store to sell. I went downtown and bought 7-8 cases for myself and friends. They were selling cases only and were selling as fast as the truck was unloading out front. The kicker was everyone had to sign a "release" that we were not going to re-sell the beer from a restaurant or bar. Personal use only.

Of course, the beer was, uh, OK. Fun memories. 

When I got the email it looked like there was one "style" (2 #s) available for 2-rail, and another for 3-rail, but after reading this thread and re-reading the email, I'm clearly wrong and not sure why I thought so the first time.

Here are the 3-rail details, in case anyone misread like I did.
Atlas O 3001571 3-Rail #21124, #21936 40' Wood Reefer
Atlas O 2002316 3-Rail # 1885, # 1890 40' Plug Door Box

Anyway, I ordered one of the wood reefers, and just realized this is the first time I've ever pre-ordered any model train, but since we drank plenty of Natty Boh in college (Salisbury Maryland) - and spent 15 additional years living in Maryland before moving here to Virginia - it was a "must get at least one"!

 

 

Add Reply

Post
OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

www.ogaugerr.com
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×
×