Auxiliary Water Tenders

MartyE posted:
Big Jim posted:

The N&W was probably the biggest user of "canteens".

Interesting terminology. Is "water bottle" also a term used on real RRs or is that a toy train term?

Never heard that one, but, you know how railfans make up their own terms.

Suspect Illinois Central was a close second to N&W in use of auxiliary water cars.  And probably for the same reason:    not stopping for water accelerated freight train speed and increased tonnage, as starting heavy freight trains was a slow, laborious process, that sapped horsepower. Recall that steam locomotive peak horsepower was reached at a MPH perhaps 10 MPH less then driver diameter. A lot more work was accomplished at that speed.

Numerous pictures are extant showing IC 4-8-2's, 2-10-2's and 2-8-2's with water cars, highballing mainline manifests and coal trains, as well as secondary lines covered by 2-8-2's.

The little narrow gauge railroad, The Uintah Railway, had built 7 rectangular steel water cars. (I have a G-gauge Uintah #021 water car for my #50 Mallet pulled gilsonite train.)

By 1939 six of these up for sale, 017-021 and 023. In May 1940 D&RGW bought all six to run on their narrow gauge, renumbering them 0465 thru 0470.

Big Jim posted:
MartyE posted:
Big Jim posted:

The N&W was probably the biggest user of "canteens".

Interesting terminology. Is "water bottle" also a term used on real RRs or is that a toy train term?

Never heard that one, but, you know how railfans make up their own terms.

Actually "water bottle" was a B&O term for a canteen or auxiliary tender. They were converted tank cars.
Used mainly on the Wheeling Division in the last years of steam.
See JJ Young's classic article in the Winter 1976 issue of Railfan Magazine.

I love this image.  One guesses the mail contract was the last customer on the branch.  How to make it work?  Use a worn out ancient 10-wheeler, shut down the infrastructure down the branch, stack up the coal (like 765 did a couple of years ago) and drag along your water supply!  Making it work!

Source for the photo is http://www.rrpicturearchives.n...ture.aspx?id=1437245

1956, Courtright, ON.

More information on this 56 year old locomotive and the environs here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...entral_1290_and_1291

 

10 wheeler and the mail train

The July 1987 "Model Railroader" featured excellent drawings of an Illinois Central 1500-series 2-8-2, including it's auxiliary water car ("cistern" to IC engine men). These cars were also used with IC 4-8-2's and 2-10-2's ("Centrals", in IC parlance)

OGR Webmaster posted:

On the 765, we call it the "A Tank." (Auxiliary Tank)

As for that horrible, purple picture above, I wonder why no one fixed it in Photoshop before posting that awful thing...

Untitled-2

probably because we are not as good with photoshop as you are!

Ed Mullan posted:

After reading the post "Chessie Steamer" above, I wondered what it's big Aux tender was, I thought it looked like NYC, and sure enough, it was from a Mowhawk!

chessie-steam-special-s1-aux-tender-farmer-001-450x.

 I found this photo at a site called "Theme Trains. com", lots of interesting stuff there

Ed

Is this tender currently in Elkhart, Indiana behind the tender that's behind the Mowhawk there?

Sam Jumper posted:
Ed Mullan posted:

After reading the post "Chessie Steamer" above, I wondered what it's big Aux tender was, I thought it looked like NYC, and sure enough, it was from a Mowhawk!

chessie-steam-special-s1-aux-tender-farmer-001-450x.

 I found this photo at a site called "Theme Trains. com", lots of interesting stuff there

Ed

Is this tender currently in Elkhart, Indiana behind the tender that's behind the Mowhawk there?

I'm pretty sure that that NYC Mohawk in Indiana has he own correct tender, as that was how she was saved & donated. Thus, the auxiliary tender from the Chess Steam Specials is not coupled to the NYC (3001?) in Elkhart, IN. 

mark s posted:

The July 1987 "Model Railroader" featured excellent drawings of an Illinois Central 1500-series 2-8-2, including it's auxiliary water car ("cistern" to IC engine men). These cars were also used with IC 4-8-2's and 2-10-2's ("Centrals", in IC parlance)

You are correct Mark, as seeing the IC come and go at Louisville, Ky as a kid, you would nearly always see, as you said, the 2-10-2's, 4-8-2's, now and then on a Mikado.....This seemed to be more prevalent in the mid 50's, assuming longer freight trains during that period, and minimizing water stops along the way.

L&N, C&O east, and Southern east/west, Monon and B&O North no added cistern cars, or at least nothing that I ever saw, but I wasn't out there everyday......!

Ed Mullan posted:

The Chessie Steam Special Aux Mohawk tender is at Indiana, in a line with other equipment, here's a photo as it appears now.

american-freedom-train-consist-2101-001a-aux-tender-indiana-01-450x

Shame to see this tender, with it's heritage, rusting. 

it was also used with 2101 on the Freedom Train:

I stopped at Elkhart on an Amtrak train once, and I could see the museum across the tracks. As a big Freedom Train fan, it killed me to know this was there, out of view, and I was that close but didn't have the time to get off and go over there.

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