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Many, many moons ago when Lionel released the B&A Berkshires using the Kline tooling.  Some were upset with the the fact the advertised whistle steam was not present on the delivered model.  Then someone noticed there's no whistle on the model at all.  I went back to my Kline versions and no whistle also.  Some tried to figure out where the whistle was placed on the real thing but I don't think it was ever solved.   So this always bugged me that my engines were missing a whistle but I always forgot to research it.   Well after looking at some videos, and through 26 pages of berkshire pics on the New York Central System historical Society, I finally got smart and emailed the society to see if anyone there knew or could find out.

Well Success.  Thanks to Rich Stoving, he found a pic that somewhat shows the location.   So those who want to purchase a brass whistle from Precision Scale, you have the location to install it.

Side note, could it be possible Lionel didn't ad the whistle steam because they couldn't find the location of the whistle?

Anyway the circled area shows the location of the missing whistle.



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Last edited by superwarp1
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Some of those smaller Berks just don’t have the room inside the shell …..I’ve recently added a Legacy Berk chassis to a B&M Kline Berk, and even without any electronics in there it’s pretty dang tight in there,….I’m not 100% familiar with the B&A Berk, so are they about the same size as the B&M?….I know Lou ( Lou1985) did an IC Berk with a Legacy chassis and a Kline shell, and he did PS3, maybe he can agree or disagree on just how tight it is in there,…..or perhaps as as you mentioned, maybe they just plumb forgot,…

Pat

I have a book titled "Berkshire Days on the Boston & Albany" that has numerous photos of B&A Berkshires. In some, a little nub just in front of the turret can be seen and is probably the whistle. Several other pictures show "whistle steam" that seems to confirm the position. My K-Line model of A-1a #1407 has what looks like a short, small-diameter whistle just ahead of the turret and slightly offset to the engineer's side - color is black - not brass. The location on my model seems to match the circled location in the OP photo. Reply here if you would like to see a photo of the model.

MELGAR

Last edited by MELGAR
@RickO posted:

Heres an excellent high quality photo Gary.  When you zoom in it  looks like it might be whistle. Theres a large port at the base of the whistle. No clue what that is. Unless its something else, maybe these locomotives have 2 whistles?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/alcomike/46412636982

20210802_150517



Now, to get this to Lionel so they don't offer a whistle steam feature and no whistle

Looks like the whistle is tapped off a supply line for maybe the generator?….this would coincide with Jack’s statement that the whistle is air operated and not by lanyard or linkage, …..I looked at that pic too, I didn’t see an air line or anything else, but that doesn’t mean it’s not there,….

Pat

@RickO posted:

Heres an excellent high quality photo Gary.  When you zoom in it  looks like it might be whistle. Theres a large port at the base of the whistle. No clue what that is. Unless its something else, maybe these locomotives have 2 whistles?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/alcomike/46412636982

20210802_150517



Now, to get this to Lionel so they don't offer a whistle steam feature and no whistle

That's definitely not a whistle.  Looks to be a consolidated type safety valve, probably to prevent over-pressurization of that pipe.

https://valves.bakerhughes.com...5411543-safety-valve

Most whistles commonly used on U.S. locomotives have the same basic form going back to pretty much the beginning.  At the simplest, they have a bell on top.  Early ones could have just been a tube with a flat or shaped top, later ones were cast and had visible "steps" depending on the height of each "chime".  Under the bell is a bowl with a languid plate in the center which directs the steam at the proper angle/velocity to strike the bell and make the sound. There is a surprising amount of precision needed in machining these parts to make a whistle sound right.

Some whistle bowls have an integrated valve, others (generally earlier on and non-locomotive applications) used a separate valve elsewhere in the plumbing.  The one below is a five chime whistle from a C&NW locomotive.  It has a horizontal valve and is a flange mounted base vs the threaded connection often used.  At the very least it's a good representation of the basic shape you'd be looking for.

7F66E0A9-6722-4554-828E-1B2A532C665E_1_201_a

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Last edited by SantaFe158

This is beginning to be one of those needle in the haystack topics. I don't know if these are covered in one of my NYC books as they do list some B&A in there, but not sure if there are close up pics. I think it is called something like NYC Steam Power or something like that. It's a paperback book, I think about 100 or so pages. I'll look tonight to see if there is anything in there.

This is beginning to be one of those needle in the haystack topics. I don't know if these are covered in one of my NYC books as they do list some B&A in there, but not sure if there are close up pics. I think it is called something like NYC Steam Power or something like that. It's a paperback book, I think about 100 or so pages. I'll look tonight to see if there is anything in there.

I’m looking through all my Stuaffer’s NYC books,  All my B&A books, still have a dvd to review.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...0998379309/sizes/4k/

@superwarp1 posted:

I’m looking through all my Stuaffer’s NYC books,  All my B&A books, still have a dvd to review.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...0998379309/sizes/4k/

Sorry Gary, worked late got home late, got side tracked. The book I have is called New York Central Steam Power In The Empire State. There was only one photo with a B&A Berkshire A1-a #1408 from Ed May. The photo was taken in 1946 I think, and was on page 37 of this book. In the comments about it, it said that the next series in these books would feature Ed May's photos and be entirely of the B&A. You may have the book. I would figure looking up any of that which I just mentioned may yield something or be right were we still are. The photo was on the engineer's side and low looking up, so no chance of seeing a whistle.

I just did a search on 1408 on my break here at work and looked at some images. Well, besides a few pictures of 1408, 1400 and 1435 popped up. There are good pictures of those two, but I think the smoke/steam that is in them is probably from a dynamo since it is back towards the cab and is more of a constant cloud than a spray like a whistle.

I'm sure that there are more pictures out there, just have to dig a bit more. Have a look at those and maybe order one of the books from Amazon unless you already have it.

@superwarp1 posted:

I think the HO guys know where it goes.  This HO model from Division Point????  Sold for 2500 or more????  Pic also from Mario.

That is a sweat looking engine.





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God that thing is sweet looking, ….looks like this is a wrap then,…I’m convinced…looks like there’s gonna be a run on PSC whistles, …no??..nice research work Gary!.

Pat

Last edited by harmonyards
@superwarp1 posted:

Here's a pic from are good friend Mario Centralfan 1976 of a IC berk, which is copy of the B&A berks.

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That is pretty cool. I saw a picture of 1454 just now in the prior search I did, and it does look like there is a little nub about there. Hard as heck to make out on the phone. The one clear picture I was looking at earlier this morning that looked like a cord up front, was for the bell which could almost be made out fairly clear. Little bit of smoke covering part of it.

I think I would definitely go for a green B&A too Gary. Would be nice to have some B&A on my railroad roster. Maybe my layout will get some build time, just have to get going.

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