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@johnstrains posted:

Mark,

I concur! I'm an avid baseball fan and have been to quite a few major league parks around the country. I used to be in a group of 25-30 that went to a different city every summer for a weekend of ball games.

PNC was one of the best and in fact is probably a solid Top 3 on the list of favorites. Everything about the experience was top notch and thoroughly enjoyed our stay.

Only problem with trying to visit ballparks these days is they build them so fast that it's hard to keep up!

John, Yes indeed it is hard to visit every ballpark.  Our now retired pastor and his son had to settle on visiting a game in every major league city, not every stadium.  I have seen games in 4 stadiums, besides Forbes Field, Three Rivers, and PNC Park, I also saw a game in Baltimore's Memorial Stadium to show how long ago that was.  If you ever go back to PNC Park, get something to eat at Manny Sanguillen's sandwich shop inside the park.  He is often there and you will be greeted with his always friendly grin.  One of the nicest Pirates ever, like Willie Stargell.

One thing I do not like that they changed in PNC Park on my last visit 2 or 3 years ago was that they added the lit panels the whole way around the edge of the upper level like they have in hockey arenas.  The lights flash on and off, back and forth.  I found it really annoying to my eyes.  That's a senor citizen's opinion.  I'm sure younger folk find it exciting!! 

Great pics!

In the summer of 1979 me, my younger brother and some of our friends would take the CNW/Metra commuter train from Glen Ellyn to Northwestern Station in Chicago, walk to the EL, ride it to the Addison Street stop, go watch the Cubs play at Wrigley Field and be back home in time for dinner or in some instances be back in time to play in our own youth league baseball games.  Since there were no lights at Wrigley at that time, the Cubs played all day games at home so sometimes we'd go to 3-4 games a week.  Both me and my brother had paper routes so were able to afford these excursions.. We were 12-14 year old kids and did this with no adult supervision.  We always had a great time, never got into any trouble and saw some good ball players too..Dave Kingman, Johnny Bench and Tom Seaver to name a few.  And it sure helped to know the train schedules too. 

Lionel trains and baseball are a large part of Americana. If it wasn’t for the fact that it would take tons of space and my future layout will be winter and/or fall I would happily put a small stadium on the layout. Now if the commissioner could just stop tinkering with rules we would be alright. Extra innings with a guy on 2nd and instant replay hurt the game.

@Mark Boyce posted:

John, Yes indeed it is hard to visit every ballpark.  Our now retired pastor and his son had to settle on visiting a game in every major league city, not every stadium.  I have seen games in 4 stadiums, besides Forbes Field, Three Rivers, and PNC Park, I also saw a game in Baltimore's Memorial Stadium to show how long ago that was.  If you ever go back to PNC Park, get something to eat at Manny Sanguillen's sandwich shop inside the park.  He is often there and you will be greeted with his always friendly grin.  One of the nicest Pirates ever, like Willie Stargell.

One thing I do not like that they changed in PNC Park on my last visit 2 or 3 years ago was that they added the lit panels the whole way around the edge of the upper level like they have in hockey arenas.  The lights flash on and off, back and forth.  I found it really annoying to my eyes.  That's a senor citizen's opinion.  I'm sure younger folk find it exciting!! 

When I was a young man living in NYC in the 70s, I once decided I wanted to see Wrigley Field. This was before lights, so only day games. I wanted to travel by train like the ball players did in the early days, so I booked a sleeper car out of Grand Central, brought my copy of Ultimate Baseball, and made a pilgrimage to Chicago. The train broke down, it rained all the way, but I made it in time to take a cab from station to Wrigley, bought a box seat on the baseline from a scalper, and as the sun broke out from behind the clouds, saw the Cubbies play a double header that day. Like Ernie Banks would have said, “Let’s play two.” Baseball and trains: magic.

My only baseball experience was a long time ago.  Our Boy Scout troop visited the newly renamed Connie Mack Stadium to see the "A"s play the Boston Red Sox.

Thing was, traveling to and from the game I was more enamored at the abundance of trolley track configurations embedded in the streets.

First and last game for me, kind of slow.

I love baseball (especially "live" at a stadium), but don't have a park on my layout. You guys inspire me.  I love baseball despite the White Sox breaking my young heart in 1959. Nevertheless, I got to see so many "greats" at Comiskey in my early years, including Maris and Mantle swinging bats during their Home Run Derby season, maybe 1961? (IIRC).

@Tom Tee posted:

My only baseball experience was a long time ago.  Our Boy Scout troop visited the newly renamed Connie Mack Stadium to see the "A"s play the Boston Red Sox.

Thing was, traveling to and from the game I was more enamored at the abundance of trolley track configurations embedded in the streets.

First and last game for me, kind of slow.

Connie Mack stadium was a trip— right downtown Philly. Real old school urban ballpark, like the kinds I’ve seen on some layouts!

My Last Game in the Bronx, Danny Ainge was playing 3rd base for the Blue Jays wonder what happened to him.

We have taken Amtrak to Baltimore(I love Camden Yards , it being the first of the new breed, also a trip down the street to the B&O museum) and Philadelphia for games, I can see going to Boston and maybe DC via Amtrak for games maybe this year.

@bptBill posted:

My Last Game in the Bronx, Danny Ainge was playing 3rd base for the Blue Jays wonder what happened to him.

We have taken Amtrak to Baltimore(I love Camden Yards , it being the first of the new breed, also a trip down the street to the B&O museum) and Philadelphia for games, I can see going to Boston and maybe DC via Amtrak for games maybe this year.

Camden Yards is great! We have a great stadium and horrible team. Ownership is a joke. B&O museum was really cool and so is the trolley museum. I haven’t been to wither since I was a kid.

@pdxtrains posted:

Connie Mack stadium was a trip— right downtown Philly. Real old school urban ballpark, like the kinds I’ve seen on some layouts!

Shibe Park/Connie Mack stadium really wasn't located in downtown Philly.  It was located at about 21st and Lehigh Avenue in north Philadelphia.  During the 30s and 40s it was a great place to go to a ballgame but by the mid to late 50s the neighborhood deteriorated significantly and wasn't the safest place in the world.  Nevertheless, during the 50s my family and I went to several games at Connie Mack and used the Philly trolley system to get there because parking your car in that area was an iffy proposition at best.  My first games there were a Sunday double header with the New York Giants in 1955 and I had the chance to see the great Willie Mays in action along with Phillies superb center fielder Richie Ashburn.  The Phils were a mediocre team at the time and lost both ends of the twin bill.   Still, great memories.  

@Csxcellent posted:

Camden Yards is great! We have a great stadium and horrible team. Ownership is a joke. B&O museum was really cool and so is the trolley museum. I haven’t been to wither since I was a kid.

Hmmm...I thought you were talking about Pittsburgh.    The rate we are going, we won't live to see either the Pirates or Orioles back in a World Series.  I'm sure Orioles fans would like a rematch for 1971 and 1979.  Oh, those were the days for both teams.  Four 20 game winners.  The Lumber Company.  I guess my baseball world is all nostalgia just like my model trains hobby.

@OKHIKER posted:

Shibe Park/Connie Mack stadium really wasn't located in downtown Philly.  It was located at about 21st and Lehigh Avenue in north Philadelphia.  During the 30s and 40s it was a great place to go to a ballgame but by the mid to late 50s the neighborhood deteriorated significantly and wasn't the safest place in the world.  Nevertheless, during the 50s my family and I went to several games at Connie Mack and used the Philly trolley system to get there because parking your car in that area was an iffy proposition at best.  My first games there were a Sunday double header with the New York Giants in 1955 and I had the chance to see the great Willie Mays in action along with Phillies superb center fielder Richie Ashburn.  The Phils were a mediocre team at the time and lost both ends of the twin bill.   Still, great memories.  

I’m sure you’d right about the location. Perhaps I thought of it as downtown because of the iffy surroundings. My father used to park the car on the street and then he’d buy what he called “insurance.” He’d tip a neighborhood kid a buck to guard the car, haha. It worked! We’d come out after the game and the car was fine,  proving that insurance can be a very good thing!

Last edited by pdxtrains
@jay jay posted:

I love baseball (especially "live" at a stadium), but don't have a park on my layout. You guys inspire me.  I love baseball despite the White Sox breaking my young heart in 1959. Nevertheless, I got to see so many "greats" at Comiskey in my early years, including Maris and Mantle swinging bats during their Home Run Derby season, maybe 1961? (IIRC).

As an 8 year old obsessed with the Yankees, the White Sox (Luis Apariccio, Nelly Fox, Billy Pierce, etc.) broke my heart in 1959 by winning the American League Pennant!

Building a baseball field on your layout is so easy. All you need is Woodland Scenics Iron Ore Fine Ballast (reddish brown dirt for the base paths) and Blended Turf or Fine Turf for the infield and outfield grass. Then, little pieces of white cardboard for home plate, the bases and the pitching rubber, and glued together Popsicle Sticks painted blue, green or brown for the bleachers or stands for the fans. Also chicken wire or similar material to make the fences and painted cardboard with numbers for the scoreboard.

Now, the next thing you need is O Scale players. I believe Scenis Express has some nice plastic ones, but the best, IMO, were made by Kramer Products (they are made of metal and beautifully painted). I got my Kramer Products players in the mid-1990s from The Choo Choo Barn (a phenomenol model train store in the York or Strasburg, PA area, and another Kramer Priducts team of players from TRAINZ 2 years ago.

Lionel Billboards are also nice to have in your ball park. Arnold

IMG_1493

Don't forget the light towers so you can have night g as mes. LOLIMG_1072

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