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I'm in need of a buck converter for my Proses engine house. The instructions specifically say to use 12v DC not AC. I use 14v AC for my accessories powered by a CW80. I really only need one (for this building only) I'd prefer to buy from Amazon as I would like it relatively quickly. Ideas are welcome.  

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Last edited by Trainlover9943
Original Post

I am no Sparky.....but would not a basic good old wall wart work? As long as it has a 12VDC output, I think it would be fine. I know that is what I use for lighting circuits that use DC instead of AC for power. Cut off the plug and wire it to the (2) inputs.

I must have a dozen or more I collected over the years in a box.

Donald

@3rail posted:

I am no Sparky.....but would not a basic good old wall wart work? As long as it has a 12VDC output, I think it would be fine. I know that is what I use for lighting circuits that use DC instead of AC for power. Cut off the plug and wire it to the (2) inputs.

I must have a dozen or more I collected over the years in a box.

Donald

I have a wall wart and being honest if it wasn't for my Lionel Command Switches which need AC, I'd use DC for my accessories. I really don't feel like rewiring separating my accessories and switches. I suppose I could if I absolutely had to. 

Last edited by Trainlover9943

What they said.  I think you're set.

A few sidebars for the record.

1. Too bad they don't provide screw-terminal on that module.  So you'll need to fire up the soldering iron.  On eBay they have AC-to-DC buck regulator modules that have screw-terminals.  The more popular eBay-from-Asia modules can be found fulfilled-by-Amazon at a higher price but you have to hunt around.  The identical module you bought from Amazon is available on eBay for somewhat less $ if you can live with the shipping delay.

ebay ac dc buck

2. Note your Amazon module is supposedly limited to 1 Amp when operating at 12V.  I didn't readily find a spec on the Prosos site for the power requirements, but I'd think 12 Watts (12V x 1A = 12W) is sufficient for a slow-speed door gear-motor plus what appears to be some LED lighting strips.  I'd be happier if the IC regulator chip on the Amazon module was on a heatsink (like the one in the above photo), but so be it.

yeeco

3. On Amazon, there's a fixed AC/DC input to 12V DC output module for about the same price - also fulfilled-by-Amazon.  The advantage here is no-soldering as there are flying-leads for the 2-input and 2-output connections.  Likewise the DC output voltage is fixed at 12V DC so you don't need a voltmeter to adjust the screw-potentiometer.

smakn

4. The above fixed-12V module identifies a "read the fine-print" scenario of these buck regulator modules.  Basically, the input voltage must be higher than the output voltage.  By-how-much involves some nerdy do-the-math.  For example, in the above fixed 12V module, it specifies an input voltage of at least 15V AC.  In broad strokes, this essentially means Yeeco module you purchased might also require 15V AC (or more) to generates 12V DC.  So will it work if fed by "only" 14V AC from a CW-80?

Before you panic, I think you're OK for what I call a quirk in the CW-80 in how it generates 14V AC.  Specifically, the CW-80 is a so-called chopped-sinewave output.  As it turns out (many geeky OGR thread on this topic), chopped sinewave outputs generate "extra" voltage in some applications including the AC-to-DC module you purchased.  Again, there have been many threads if you want to get into the nuts-and-volts of the matter but I simply mention it for the sake of completeness.

 

 

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@stan2004 posted:

What they said.  I think you're set.

A few sidebars for the record.

1. Too bad they don't provide screw-terminal on that module.  So you'll need to fire up the soldering iron.  On eBay they have AC-to-DC buck regulator modules that have screw-terminals.  The more popular eBay-from-Asia modules can be found fulfilled-by-Amazon at a higher price but you have to hunt around.  The identical module you bought from Amazon is available on eBay for somewhat less $ if you can live with the shipping delay.

ebay ac dc buck

2. Note your Amazon module is supposedly limited to 1 Amp when operating at 12V.  I didn't readily find a spec on the Prosos site for the power requirements, but I'd think 12 Watts (12V x 1A = 12W) is sufficient for a slow-speed door gear-motor plus what appears to be some LED lighting strips.  I'd be happier if the IC regulator chip on the Amazon module was on a heatsink (like the one in the above photo), but so be it.

yeeco

3. On Amazon, there's a fixed AC/DC input to 12V DC output module for about the same price - also fulfilled-by-Amazon.  The advantage here is no-soldering as there are flying-leads for the 2-input and 2-output connections.  Likewise the DC output voltage is fixed at 12V DC so you don't need a voltmeter to adjust the screw-potentiometer.

smakn

4. The above fixed-12V module identifies a "read the fine-print" scenario of these buck regulator modules.  Basically, the input voltage must be higher than the output voltage.  By-how-much involves some nerdy do-the-math.  For example, in the above fixed 12V module, it specifies an input voltage of at least 15V AC.  In broad strokes, this essentially means Yeeco module you purchased might also require 15V AC (or more) to generates 12V DC.  So will it work if fed by "only" 14V AC from a CW-80?

Before you panic, I think you're OK for what I call a quirk in the CW-80 in how it generates 14V AC.  Specifically, the CW-80 is a so-called chopped-sinewave output.  As it turns out (many geeky OGR thread on this topic), chopped sinewave outputs generate "extra" voltage in some applications including the AC-to-DC module you purchased.  Again, there have been many threads if you want to get into the nuts-and-volts of the matter but I simply mention it for the sake of completeness.

 

 

Thanks for the info Stan, I was actually thinking about getting the second module (the one that requires no soldering) but I don't mind soldering on a few wires. 

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