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I remember a Menards wish list thread back around 2020 and just thought we could use a new one. This isn't limited by manufacturer though. It could be from any of them. Here's five buildings I've been wishing for over the past several years.

1. Frito-Lay factory

2. Heinz Factory

3. Tropicana Juicing Plant

4. Sherwin Williams processing plant

5. Generic/made up tool/die factory (Threading, Machining, Fabricating,)

Last edited by Stinky1
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Looks like a great scratch builder's to-do list!!

Of course, the easy way out is to take a commercial pre-built and slap some new labels/overlays on the building sides and/or rooftops.  As an example, Morrison Doors or a Tide soap facility can become a Sherwin Williams paint facility with new signage, and maybe a couple/few adjacent vertical tanks and mock feed pipes,

Another low budget, no time, tepid/trepid skills confidence approach is to do as some professional architects.  Make some mock-ups using foam core board, decorate with colored pens/pencils, photographic cutouts.     This is often an especially handy approach if your building site has limitations or irregularities that require something besides a 4-wall rectilinear facility. 

Look at the availability of kits/pre-builts in other (read: more popular) scales...like HO.  They may have something that can be replicated in 1:48. 

Here's a good reason to look through some old, say...pre-1950's...hobby publications.   Back then there were NO pre-built (or few kit-form) structures of any sort.  How-To-Build articles used common materials, developed basic skills, often gave amazingly realistic results.  Frank Ellison...the Delta LInes...was one of several masters of this approach for new structures/industries for the layout.

Then, of course, there's the custom builders route.  Lots of professional talent out there in this area.  It probably ain't cheap, though.  I wouldn't know...never asked...haven't heard.   My cardiologist would prefer I keep away from further revelations of this sort.  Which leads me to...

Besides, just how long are we willing to wait for someone else to commercialize what we want??  Tempus fugit!  When 'yours truly' stands at the brink of octogenarianship, I've all but given up on this sort of waiting game.  (My last...and probably final...appeal to manufacturers in this wish-list approach was 3rd Rail's production of the early ATSF/B&O E-class diesels!  As Gomer Pyle exclaimed, "Surprise, surprise!!!)

Just some random thoughts...FWIW.

KD

A WWII-era barracks building. Many of us have military-themed layouts and/or items which likely include Menard's military vehicles and Quonset huts. 1940s style barracks are unique, were in every post imaginable, and would certainly complement a military collection. Besides, it would be a pleasant (ahem) reminder to all who spent time cleaning, scrubbing, waxing, and fire guarding these structures.

Failing that, some steam service facilities would be nice: service platforms, ash hoists, and maybe a Milwaukee style sand tower - the square one.

Last edited by Jim Brenner
@Jim Brenner posted:

A WWII-era barracks building. Many of us have military-themed layouts and/or items which likely include Menard's military vehicles and Quonset huts. 1940s style barracks are unique, were in every post imaginable, and would certainly complement a military collection. Besides, it would be a pleasant (ahem) reminder to all who spent time cleaning, scrubbing, waxing, and fire guarding these structures. ...snip...

And if "you" do; please, please make it proper 1/48 scale. Not down-sized like some Plasticville buildings.

Even the Navy had them, I was in one at NAS Memphis for training so they should appeal to almost anyone who served; at least through the Vietnam era.

I don't care what it is,  but the structure needs to be either brick or steel siding faced.  Too many buildings in O SCALE are wooded or clapboard,  from the early 1900's.  Since the 1920's or so commercial buildings were required to be built of brick or some other fireproof construction. You look at present building kits  from a general store to a mine or roundhouse and the majority have a wood siding on them.

@Menards @Jim Brenner @PRRMP54

Here's a prototype for a WW II to 1970s style wooden military barracks.  This one was used as a recruit barracks at the 3704th Basic Military Training Squadron, Lackland AFB, TX.  (3704 BMTS) (I didn't get to stay in one of these barracks; I was in the 3704 BMTS 1,000 man Recruit Housing and Training (RH&T) dormitory.)

WW II-style basic training barracks Lackland AFB 1970

As a young airman with only two stripes on my sleeve, I worked in a nearly identical building at the 1st Transportation Squadron, Langley AFB, VA in 1977 and 1978 that had been converted from a barracks to an office building.  One of the 1 TRS building's reminders of its origins was the large latrine on each floor with multiple commodes and showers.

Menards could conceivable offer two versions of this building, one as a barracks with an appropriately scaled and furnished interior and one as an office building with appropriately scaled interior and furnishings.  (In the case of the 1 TRS building, the entrance was on the side of the building because the latrines were on one end of the building a fire stairs at the other.)

I hope this info is helpful.

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Here is a link to some very interesting photos of those barracks:

https://armybarracks.army/2020...1/old-army-barracks/

The first row of photos, the barracks on the right is just like the one I was in at NATTC, Memphis. Note the awning-style "roof" that shades the first floor windows, we had that style at Memphis.

There were still a few at Fort Meade when I worked there as a civilian that were still in service as offices around 1975 > 1977. At the time, when I worked in the base drafting office and ran the ozalid machine making copies of drawings, I remember finding drawings for these barracks buildings and making a set of blue-line prints for myself; this was back around 1976 or so. The prints have long since submerged into the morass that my files became!

Last edited by PRRMP54

Barracks like those in the pictures above were in use until at least the late the 90's. ROTC cadets at summer camp at Fort Bragg (1992) and Fort Lewis (1999) were quartered in them. We were put up in them upon returning from Bosnia in 1996.  In addition to the barracks, each company/battery area had a single-story orderly room, and each battalion area (I think) had a chapel. Fort Benning's Museum has a representative cantonment area as part of its display - pictured above.

With the computer, 3D printers and all the new products that are out there I'm sure you can create any building you need or want. I prefer scratch building from photos or plans and all my buildings are custom to fit the space that I have available. I use Poly-styrene and Precision Board for most of my buildings and the computer is a great sign maker.

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800-980-OGRR (6477)
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