Here is an Ambroid Reading Reefer.  Minor changes included some additional brake rigging and converting the scribed sheeting for the roof walk and ice hatch platforms to individual boards. The original kit decals were used. It rides on Atlas 2 rail Andrews trucks.

ambroid reading reefer c1ambroid reading reefer c2ambroid reading reefer c3ambroid reading reefer c4ambroid reading reefer c5

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HO scale, 3 Rail guy here. Red Caboose kit back dated brake gear with added details.

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Inspired by.

Pete

 

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Last edited by Norton
Brother_Love posted:

I’m about to start a Mainline Models kit. It is my first one and I’m a little afraid 😁

Yes, wood, not styrene.  Great fun and raw materials in a box; probably will end up tossing all the castings into the scrap heap pile on the layout.

Here's a Main Line Models 'basic kit' finished as an ART reefer. It rides on Athearn metal Andrews trucks with full under body detail. Floquil paint and Champ decals finished it. 

The B&O flanger is older, built from of a Train Craft No. 404 tool caboose first put together in 1954. Rebuilt as seen here in the mid 1990's, The Old Pullman arch bar trucks are fitted with Precision Scale leaf springs. Truss rods were added and the plow is brass, built from B&O drawings. The Train Craft body is a perfect match for the B&O M-8 class box car body, which prototype SF 43 was originally. 

Both are all wood construction, with a few stamped and cast metal details.  The Main Line body has inside sheathing of 1/16" sheet wood glued on using contact cement, with its grain running lengthwise across the vertical grain of the car sides. This helps keep the sides stable and resist splitting. The flanger body was done that way as well.

S. Islander 

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S. Islander,

Those are great looking cars. Mine is a CB&Q 40’ OB boxcar. I doubt mine will look that nice.

is it best to seal the wood with sanding sealer before assembly?

thank you 

Brother_Love posted:

S. Islander,

Those are great looking cars. Mine is a CB&Q 40’ OB boxcar. I doubt mine will look that nice.

Don't sell yourself short - you've got skills!

is it best to seal the wood with sanding sealer before assembly?

 

I am sure that there will be those that will state that sealing wood is a paramount necessity.  Never done it....or found it necessary....and I file it as yet another fine example of model RR'ing mythology.

Re-freshed these kits, which I started many years ago.  I find it amazing the detail.  Who would of thunk, the windows move up/down.   I was thinking interior finish with wood stain, lighter oak, for the floors, may be a dark walnut for the walls.  I do have a blue stain on the shelf.  ???Caboose green interior???   I was surprised to get a lot done, with-out a trip to the hobby shop, or local hardware store.  Wood assembly, with Elmer's white glue.  

Buffalo and Pittsburgh caboose kits, matches Montour Railroad woodside cabooses.   

One more:  Golden Oak stain, probably the easiest way to paint the interior. 

Update April 6, (Monday), 2020   Additional interior parts added, curved roof panels complete, and cupola work started. 

 

Last edited by Mike CT

Sealing would really depend on whether you were using water based or solvent based paints.  Water based would raise the grain and potentially warp the wood.   Also if you were using acc or epoxy to assemble you should be all right without sealing, however, white or yellow wood glue could cause problems with larger laminations of thinner material, like roof sheathing over a solid substructure.   Personally I use a sandable grey spray model primer.  

"is it best to seal the wood with sanding sealer before assembly?"

I think so.  Even on all the cabinets I built, the purpose of the sanding sealer was to make the soft grain "fuzzies" hard enough so they would break off during sanding, leaving a smooth finish.  We have all seen wood fuzz on painted models, and one practical way to get rid of it is sanding.  This could be done after assembly, but is much more difficult, or in some cases , impossible.

Now, the down side...The easiest sealer is lacquer based because it dries fast and does not load sandpaper. (a lot of sanding sealers are just lacquer and talcum powder). It goes fast and produces an excellent surface for painting when sanded with 400 or so grit.   BUT ,, the sanding sealer makes a barrier for your adhesives...so even if you assembling with CA, your joints will not be any stronger than the lacquer--I guess you could imagine assembling a model with lacquer paint for glue. I find it is strong enough for most joints on a model , but not all.

Still, lacquer sanding sealer has produced such nice results for me that I continue to use it , but I scrap it off where I am gluing on things like bolsters, or little details like brake platforms ect.    this can be a major pain on things like all the diagonal braces on a single sheathed car, but the next time you see a house car with a missing roof batten, you can bet they were glued on after sanding sealer.  

I will keep using it because I like the results.  Take scribed sheeting for instance. most all of it is way too deep, and sometimes fuzzy. I brush on one or two  coats of a lacquer paint and presto the the scribes are a believable depth. Going over after with a tooth brush really cleans it all up and removes fuzz without ruining the wood grain look. That activity would not be possible with the grabs and door hardware already on .

Kind regards,  Jeff 'JJ' Davies   San Ramon Ca 

 

 

J J Davies posted:
 Take scribed sheeting for instance. most all of it is way too deep, and sometimes fuzzy. I brush on one or two  coats of a lacquer paint and presto the the scribes are a believable depth. Going over after with a tooth brush really cleans it all up and removes fuzz without ruining the wood grain look.

 

 

I use a soft brass wire brush to prep scribed siding for painting.  Clean out all the dust and debris.

Just posted pics of  Omaha box.  I've never posted pics here, so please be patient with a Luddite.

This car started life as an Ambroid Oly beer refer....I was just taking pics n bad light, but was trying to show  scribe being filled in some.  Regards, Jeff Davies 

Jeff, that is an outstanding job in changing a rudimentary kit into an exact scale model. About all that's left of Ambroid is the scribed sheeting. Coincidentally, I am also converting an Ambroid Olympia reefer to a truss rod underframe. Mine won't compare though; I don't have that much skill.

Jim

Yes Jeff - had to look several times to make sure it wasn't the real thing in a museum.

I too use sealer, but am not enough of a wood expert to recommend anything.  Jeff surely qualifies as an expert.

Nice baggage car - try your photo editor to lighten the photos up.  Easy.

jjscott posted:

Jeff, that is an outstanding job in changing a rudimentary kit into an exact scale model. About all that's left of Ambroid is the scribed sheeting. Coincidentally, I am also converting an Ambroid Olympia reefer to a truss rod underframe. Mine won't compare though; I don't have that much skill.

Jim

Nonsense. Your models are every bit as good as mine and yours display a clean crispness that is very difficult for me to obtain.  The only possible difference is on this model I used more NBWs --but man, the camera sure shows I did not put a rivit or pin detail on the brake rod shackles--I'll take it apart this afternoon.....Uhh, no.

Anyhoo,  I really enjoyed seeing what you have built.   I like nicely put together models so much, I have even been buying some on Ebay that have damage from careless clunk heads & it's a matter of satisfaction to repair them just like their proud builders had them one fine day long ago.

And, Bob, thank you for the kind words.  You've done a great job yourself and have promoted nice kit building and scratch for many years --don't think I haven't noticed!   Kind regards,   Jeff JJ Davies San Ramon Ca

And BRR-- A very nice job on your baggage , particularly for your first  !!!  The roof is very well shaped , and you even included the curved edge that a lot of guys leave out !    It's a heck of a lot better than my early models , let alone first!!!!!!

You guys think it would be fun or a good idea to start a thread featuring pics of first or early models?  I might have a HO car or two from fifty -odd years ago that would be good for laughing at me --I'll show you mine if....... 

Jeff JJ Davies

Appears model paints do well without a sealer.  Attempt is to preserve as much laser cut detail as possible.  Stains work well, model paint is thin/provides the color needed.   A dull, satin, or gloss coat applied with an air brush a final two steps.  Gloss  before decals, Satin or dull after decals as a finish.  IMO  Mike CT. 

Paint today April 7   Floquil (acrylic) Zinc chrome primer  Engine Black 

Last edited by Mike CT

Hi BRR - Looking back in the thread, I misunderstood--It's your first  WALTHERS car. 

But, anyway, anybody want to expose their early attempts? 

Mike, that looks great!   Glenn did a wonderful job with those kits --who else had scribed roof sheeting on the UNDERSIDE !  Glenn has actually rebuilt full size old time passenger cars --quite the craftsman. It is regrettable that his kits are no longer being made.  

J J Davies posted:

Mike, that looks great!   Glenn did a wonderful job with those kits --who else had scribed roof sheeting on the UNDERSIDE !  Glenn has actually rebuilt full size old time passenger cars --quite the craftsman. It is regrettable that his kits are no longer being made.  

Yes, Mullet River was the ultimate wood kit. It is such a pity nobody could resurrect that company.

Yves

jjscott posted:

Ambroid Erie-Susquehanna 50 Ton 3 Bay Hopper: Posted here, but it didn't turn out as well as I hoped. My first mistake was to seal the wood with nitrate dope mixed with automotive flattener. Then I primed with Tamiya lacquer primer. While the process sealed the wood, it meant that most glues including C.A. didn't stick well, so parts kept falling off. Second mistake was the Grandt Line .043 rivets; they're not straight (my fault) and show all the excess glue blobs. Not much sticks to the metal ends and body ribs. I resorted to 5 minute epoxy.  Add dirt on the surface when painting and impenetrable decal film. As a finale, I dropped my airbrush needle when cleaning and bent the tip. It was sure a challenge, and I am relieved to have it finished.

It is pretty much out of the box except for the rivets and 1/8 brass angle corners. I used the old Walthers kit decals.

It sits on Atlas 2 rail Andrews trucks. I did build the HO version of this way back when and have always liked the looks of the car. Despite my complaints, I do enjoy building these old kits and will start another soon.

Jim

ambroid erie hopper c1ambroid erie hopper c2ambroid erie hopper c3ambroid erie hopper c4ambroid erie hopper c5

This car looks great!!!

A couple of labelle cars....The Heinz is the Moore refer. Both these cars I built a while ago , but after I finely realized that truss rods need to look like they are threaded over the bolster, and that if you are running 72 radius, the trucks swing very little and the rods can be placed in and out side the wheels . Hence, I set up the rods so that they might even touch the wheels if entering a 60 inch radius.

That and leaving the brake rigging hanging down on the ...err..hangers,, well, I like the way it looks. 

I have found that installing the grabs, and then pricking and drilling directly above them for plastic NBW works well.  The NBW is then forced in and when it is, the washer part sort of bends into the grab wire.  I glue the grab wire , but not the NBW , having found the paint and overcoat holds them in their holes without getting glue slopped around .

Russ at Clover supplied the transfers

Norton posted:

HO scale, 3 Rail guy here. Red Caboose kit back dated brake gear with added details.

image

Inspired by.

Pete

 

I do believe I see a Jack Delano photo!

The Racine car is a little diff.  It is cut down in length.  Often, I cut cars, but usually from 36 to 34--By the way, I adjust car length to the scribed sheeting --yupp.  Most your sheet is 1/16th thick and scribed 1/16th -- wouldn't be groovy if on corners, the thickness of the sheet exposed as the first board? or at least not having half a board ?--well, you can.  as example, procedure for sides overlaying ends:

Dry fit the side pieces together, beveling just enough to get a consistent scribe-line at the joints. glue face down on parchment baking paper.  Now , take the side sheet and lay it on the car floor.  You can figure out which  scribe line the car length will fall on by looking at the two while allowing for the thickness of the end sheets.  Hopefully, a couple of pieces of strathmore paper under the end sheets will lengthen the body to the desired side scribe.  mark the sides as they will not be interchangeable.

Once the length is figured, you can glue the end sheets on,  mindful that you are going to sand the body with end sheets attached to the next end scribe. use a full sheet of quality 80 or 100 sandpaper glued to a flat surface .  Put a little bevel on the ends to match the scribe before gluing the sides on --and don't forget to laminate something to the insides of the sides--both these models have scribe separation because I'm stupid and I didn't ...I know of no way to fix it.

The end hardware is HO Grandt line mining gate hinges--I showed it to Cliff and he really liked it --in fact , see that broken brake wheel?  Cliff Grandt himself accidentally snagged it with his wristwatch while examining and broke it !   I will probably only half *** fix it cause it reminds me of him and how much I enjoyed our interactions--he was really a great guy and an astounding craftsman! 

Oh! , the trucks ....those are All Nation--the ones with that big blank on top above the springs--well, I cut the top arch bar and bent it down, then filed off the top ..and Voila' , a pretty good flatter top arch bar...It would probably look better with new san jaun or equal trucks, but I was so proud of myself at the time .. 

Regards, Jeff JJ Davies   San Ramon CA 

rex desilets posted:
Norton posted:

HO scale, 3 Rail guy here. Red Caboose kit back dated brake gear with added details.

image

Inspired by.

Pete

 

I do believe I see a Jack Delano photo!

Big fan of Jack. Another Red Caboose kit.

Pete

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Last edited by Norton
J J Davies posted:

Russ at Clover supplied the transfers

Clover House transfers are such a delight to make unique looking cars.

This is a conversion of an Ambroid Olympia Beer reefer. It has scratched ice hatches and a truss rod underframe using Protocraft queen posts and turnbuckles. Door latches are Berkshire Valley. The trucks are Protocraft brass archbar; the decals are by K4.

 

ambroid oly reefer 1ambroid oly reefer 2ambroid oly reefer 3ambroid oly reefer 4ambroid oly reefer 5ambroid oly reefer 6

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