Skip to main content

I am totally new to CAB2. I absolutely love it and did pretty well with it for my first time ever using it. That being said, I DO have a few questions. I searched Google and YouTube for insight, but I am not seeing answers to my questions. Thought I would ask the OGR:

1. Does everyone power down the track before placing a locomotive on the track? What if you want to remove one locomotive and put another one on the track? What steps do you follow? Sounds like it should be: (a) Power down the track; (b) Remove locomotive from track; (c) Put another locomotive on track; (d) Power up the track. Does this look right? How do you power down the track? Only thing I can think of is the transformer lever. Is there another way?

2. So far, I really do not understand the L, M, H Momentum operations. I accidentally activated it and was not sure how to get things back to non-momentum operations. If I don’t want to use momentum operations, how do I get the locomotive back to regular operation without using momentum? I saw where someone said to push and hold down the L key. Is that what I would do to exit momentum operations?

3. I have seen the different speed buttons that appear at the push of the Speed button, but they look to me to simply be railroad presets for 5mph, 20 mph, 35 mph, 50 mph, 70 mph, and highball. Kind of a quick way to pick preset speeds. Am I correct?

Thanks!

Original Post

Replies sorted oldest to newest

@DILLI posted:

I am totally new to CAB2. I absolutely love it and did pretty well with it for my first time ever using it. That being said, I DO have a few questions. I searched Google and YouTube for insight, but I am not seeing answers to my questions. Thought I would ask the OGR:

1. Does everyone power down the track before placing a locomotive on the track? What if you want to remove one locomotive and put another one on the track? What steps do you follow? Sounds like it should be: (a) Power down the track; (b) Remove locomotive from track; (c) Put another locomotive on track; (d) Power up the track. Does this look right? How do you power down the track? Only thing I can think of is the transformer lever. Is there another way?

2. So far, I really do not understand the L, M, H Momentum operations. I accidentally activated it and was not sure how to get things back to non-momentum operations. If I don’t want to use momentum operations, how do I get the locomotive back to regular operation without using momentum? I saw where someone said to push and hold down the L key. Is that what I would do to exit momentum operations?

3. I have seen the different speed buttons that appear at the push of the Speed button, but they look to me to simply be railroad presets for 5mph, 20 mph, 35 mph, 50 mph, 70 mph, and highball. Kind of a quick way to pick preset speeds. Am I correct?

Thanks!

I’ve had mine a few years and I love it also.  It’s a fun way to run trains.

1.  You are correct and that’s how I do it.  I have a power strip and turn on/off power there. I also have switched power on sidings so I can pull an engine onto a siding, power off the siding and remove the engine.

2.  I use the M button. If you hold that down and turn the dial, you can change the momentum from 1 to 8.  At 1, there is no momentum and 8 is full momentum.  4 is the default and I usually run at 5 or 6.  8 is cool but it’s pretty slow to get to full speed or slow down.

3.  You are correct.  You can use those after you set the momentum where you want it.

hope this helps and enjoy.

@Tanner111 posted:

2.  I use the M button. If you hold that down and turn the dial, you can change the momentum from 1 to 8.  At 1, there is no momentum and 8 is full momentum.  4 is the default and I usually run at 5 or 6.  8 is cool but it’s pretty slow to get to full speed or slow down.



To add to this, I think the L M and H buttons are how momentum is set for TMCC locomotives.  L is like instant throttle response, M medium, and with H the locomotive speeds up and slows down only after a lot of throttle (red knob) movement.

@Tanner111 posted:

I’ve had mine a few years and I love it also.  It’s a fun way to run trains.

1.  You are correct and that’s how I do it.  I have a power strip and turn on/off power there. I also have switched power on sidings so I can pull an engine onto a siding, power off the siding and remove the engine.

2.  I use the M button. If you hold that down and turn the dial, you can change the momentum from 1 to 8.  At 1, there is no momentum and 8 is full momentum.  4 is the default and I usually run at 5 or 6.  8 is cool but it’s pretty slow to get to full speed or slow down.

3.  You are correct.  You can use those after you set the momentum where you want it.

hope this helps and enjoy.

Jim - thanks. Everything was going well until I touched the buttons for Momentum. All of a sudden, the locomotive hardly moved. I knew I was over my head and was combing the manual to try to figure out what I had done, but the manual does not really explain the Momentum concept well. I had assumed that H was for high speed, which is why I tried to fix the problem by selecting H repeatedly. I now know that I had it backwards. H means higher degree of the Momentum function. Oh well, I just didn't understand the whole concept of the Momentum function. What an incredibly amazing feature. The difference between these modern locomotives and postwar locomotives is just beyond belief. These modern locomotives replicate the behavior of real locomotives more than I had ever imagined. I absolutely LOVE it!!

From what I am reading, the preset railroad speeds can be used without using the Momentum function.

@rplst8 posted:

To add to this, I think the L M and H buttons are how momentum is set for TMCC locomotives.  L is like instant throttle response, M medium, and with H the locomotive speeds up and slows down only after a lot of throttle (red knob) movement.

Thanks rplst8 - for now I am going to run without Momentum. I am currently just using a very small 9' test strip. Once I have my layout finished, I will check out the Momentum function in greater depth. Just incredible what can be done with these modern locomotives. Absolutely blows my mind.

The idea behind the momentum feature is it simulates the slow acceleration and deceleration of a real locomotive pulling a train.

I use the M setting, and adjust the knob to about 5 or 6.

Another neat feature about momentum is. Once the loco is moving. If you spin the throttle back down to zero brake sounds will come on and the engine will slowly come grinding to a stop.

Since your just getting familiar. The "train brake slider" is actually more of a "train load slider".

Setting the slider lower will limit the speed the loco will go. However, you can turn the throttle past the brake indicator on the screen and the locomotive will labor harder as the throttle is increased.

In the case of steamers. Having the train brake just off the bottom and turning the throttle all the way yields a dramatic chuff. Just like a real steamer fighting a grade.

The cab2 is a great remote. Alot of the features can be discovered simply by " playing around" with it. It's really not as complicated as it may look.

Last edited by RickO
@RickO posted:

The idea behind the momentum feature is it simulates the slow acceleration and deceleration of a real locomotive pulling a train.

I use the M setting, and adjust the knob to about 5 or 6.

Another neat feature about momentum is. Once the loco is moving. If you spin the throttle back down to zero brake sounds will come on and the engine will slowly come grinding to a stop.

Since your just getting familiar. The "train brake slider" is actually more of a "train load slider".

Setting the slider lower will limit the speed the loco will go. However, you can turn the throttle past the brake indicator on the screen and the locomotive will labor harder as the throttle is increased.

In the case of steamers. Having the train brake just off the bottom and turning the throttle all the way yields a dramatic chuff. Just like a real steamer fighting a grade.

The cab2 is a great remote. Alot of the features can be discovered simply by " playing around" with it. It's really not as complicated as it may look.

Thanks, Rick! Once my layout is built, I will try all of the things you shared to see which one I like the most. Who ever thought of this stuff? Unbelievable. It is absolutely amazing! I LOVE it!

@RickO posted:

Neil Young. Not surprising that someone who sings, plays guitar and harmonica at the same time could come up with such a genius train controller.

Great point! Interestingly, Rick, I have loved and listened to Neil Young's music my entire life. I have just about everything he ever recorded. I never would have thought that he would be interested in trains, but I had never really known much about his family life.  I searched for his connection to model railroading on the Internet a few months back and found some videos. I was blown away as I watched the videos of him and his son operating trains. God bless him and his son. Incredible story and situation. Thanks for reminding me about that, Rick! Remarkable situation. Demands our respect for sure.

Richard Kughn helped too. He and Neil Young teamed up to create Liontech in the mid 1990s. Liontech created TMCC. Legacy is fantastic, by the way. My favorite feature is obviously the quilling whistle/horn.

So true, Dylan. Thank goodness Richard Kughn came along and worked to get Lionel back on track again (no pun intended). I was into trains back in the 1970s and early 1980s, and then life happened and I got distracted. I was away from the hobby for almost 40 years! Back in August of 2021 I finally got back into everything. These modern locomotives have features that are absolutely unbelievable. I agree - the quilling whistle is just unreal. I am also amazed by all of the methods to simulate increases in locomotive laboring and chuffing. Just incredible. I LOVE it all! The thing that got me into all of the modern locomotives was when I went to an open house at a local model railroading club back in September of 2021. I couldn't get over how slow one of the locomotives was creeping along the track. It looked so incredibly realistic, and the sound was out of this world. You could never do that with postwar equipment. I asked the guy how the locomotive could just creep like that, so steady and unwaveringly. He explained the concept of DC motors to me and speed control, and I fell in love with the whole nine yards. I sold all of my postwar equipment and went 100% Legacy with locomotives. I just used a CAB2 yesterday for the first time on my own equipment and I was absolutely floored by what one can do with these modern locomotives.

Add Reply

Post
This forum is sponsored by Lionel, LLC
OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

www.ogaugerr.com
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×
×