Can you tell I don't save boxes? I keep original Lionel boxes and a few for some really special sets, but otherwise all the repro boxes go in the trash.

Steve

trash

Steve "Papa" Eastman

Yorba Linda, CA

Left Coast, Home of the lunatics

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I recall an old timer telling me how they would burn boxes after buying trains back in the 50s and 60s.  They just didn't want to store the boxes.  

Oh what he must have burned!

Steamer posted:

I wouldn't think twice about the MTH boxes, but I wouldn't mind some of those Lionel boxes just for wall art.  

Would you like a box for a 262 crossing gate ?  I put two of them for sale on eBay in June at $2.00 + $2.00 shipping and one sold in December.  If you promise to put it on the wall, I'll send the other free of charge.

I never throw away anything that says Lionel (and is real).  Worst case is to out it on the free table at a TCA show - never had one not taken by somebody.  I agree with Steve on repro boxes - automatic move to the recycling bin.

Steamer posted:

I wouldn't think twice about the MTH boxes, but I wouldn't mind some of those Lionel boxes just for wall art.  

I have one from an LCT box on my wall.

Steve

Steve "Papa" Eastman

Yorba Linda, CA

Left Coast, Home of the lunatics

mlaughlinnyc posted:
Steamer posted:

I wouldn't think twice about the MTH boxes, but I wouldn't mind some of those Lionel boxes just for wall art.  

Would you like a box for a 262 crossing gate ?  I put two of them for sale on eBay in June at $2.00 + $2.00 shipping and one sold in December.  If you promise to put it on the wall, I'll send the other free of charge.

I never throw away anything that says Lionel (and is real).  Worst case is to out it on the free table at a TCA show - never had one not taken by somebody.  I agree with Steve on repro boxes - automatic move to the recycling bin.

I sure would! and Thanks for the offer! My e mail is in my profile.

I believe stuff in boxes is worth more. It’s especially evident with prewar stuff, but it’s true even with MTH. Trains ship much better in the original box too. I have proven my theory by looking at completed eBay sales. 

The counter argument is this. If you don’t care about 10% value of an MTH box, then it probably isn’t worth the space it takes. If you don’t sell much, then it’s probably not important to you. It’s easier to box stuff up without the original box. Not everyone has space for boxes. I have a crawl space (sealed) full of them. Some aren’t even original, just storage boxes. 

George

I recall once throwing out some 1930s American Flyer boxes, which I hated to do.  However, a previous owner had left them out for their dog or cat to pee on and they reeked so bad that I could not throw them out fast enough.  

NWL

Nation Wide Lines posted:

I recall once throwing out some 1930s American Flyer boxes, which I hated to do.  However, a previous owner had left them out for their dog or cat to pee on and they reeked so bad that I could not throw them out fast enough.  

NWL

I don't think there is a good way to clean pee off cardboard. Also, once cardboard gets wet, it will be damaged pretty fast. 

There is a whole business in reproduction boxes. There's a guy in the orange hall at York who had a whole multi-table setup. It was mostly postwar boxes if I recall.

I have had problems with the new Lionel LCT boxes. The glue doesn't hold on most of them. I've tried re-gluing with not so good results. I haven't tried Paper Cement yet. Maybe that would work better.

George

For repros, I think the box only adds value if the contents are unused.  Once you've run it, the box is just trash.

Originals are a whole different story.  Often the box reveals as much as a close inspection of the item.

Kirk

I never gave a thought to using the old boxes for wall art, sounds like it might be pretty cool to see. I'll have to give it a try.

I do have the 1952 "Hey Fellows! Let's build a layout" poster from my first set framed and on the wall above the work bench.

"You have to grow old. You don't have to grow up". Ray Bradbury

George S posted:
Nation Wide Lines posted:

I recall once throwing out some 1930s American Flyer boxes, which I hated to do.  However, a previous owner had left them out for their dog or cat to pee on and they reeked so bad that I could not throw them out fast enough.  

NWL

I don't think there is a good way to clean pee off cardboard. Also, once cardboard gets wet, it will be damaged pretty fast. 

There is a whole business in reproduction boxes. There's a guy in the orange hall at York who had a whole multi-table setup. It was mostly postwar boxes if I recall.

I have had problems with the new Lionel LCT boxes. The glue doesn't hold on most of them. I've tried re-gluing with not so good results. I haven't tried Paper Cement yet. Maybe that would work better.

George

George, try contact cement or spray adhesive.  Apply it to both surfaces, wait 30 seconds, then join together.  I've fixed quite a few that way.

MikeH

Steve "Papa" Eastman posted:

Can you tell I don't save boxes? I keep original Lionel boxes and a few for some really special sets, but otherwise all the repro boxes go in the trash.

Steve

trash

I think you've motivated me, Steve. These things take up a lot of space. I can see collectors in 50 years yearning for original MTH boxes. Well, maybe not. You and I will work on the 'scarcity' angle.

Jim

Jim Waterman



 

artyoung posted:

I never gave a thought to using the old boxes for wall art, sounds like it might be pretty cool to see. I'll have to give it a try.

I do have the 1952 "Hey Fellows! Let's build a layout" poster from my first set framed and on the wall above the work bench.

Here’s a few on my wall.

Steve

46115E96-CDE4-4550-9B4E-100F71373A4C353E433C-901D-4FAF-B1A7-4F6576C5EDD4

Steve "Papa" Eastman

Yorba Linda, CA

Left Coast, Home of the lunatics

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SGMA1 posted:

For repros, I think the box only adds value if the contents are unused.  Once you've run it, the box is just trash.

Originals are a whole different story.  Often the box reveals as much as a close inspection of the item.

Kirk

That’s my general attitude. The exceptions are the gold Millennium set, the Prosperity Special and the limited edition Army and Navy sets from last year.

Steve

Steve "Papa" Eastman

Yorba Linda, CA

Left Coast, Home of the lunatics

The cardboard lays flat like shown in picture.

It's the Styrofoam that takes up space. But for moving the Styrofoam I think to a point keeps it protected.  Somethings still break.  Getting them in and out .

Riki

my two cents...I'd keep all boxes from the original Lionel Corp. If you don't want them, put them on ebay and get some $ outta them.

George S posted:
Nation Wide Lines posted:

I recall once throwing out some 1930s American Flyer boxes, which I hated to do.  However, a previous owner had left them out for their dog or cat to pee on and they reeked so bad that I could not throw them out fast enough.  

NWL

I don't think there is a good way to clean pee off cardboard. Also, once cardboard gets wet, it will be damaged pretty fast. 

There is a whole business in reproduction boxes. There's a guy in the orange hall at York who had a whole multi-table setup. It was mostly postwar boxes if I recall.

I have had problems with the new Lionel LCT boxes. The glue doesn't hold on most of them. I've tried re-gluing with not so good results. I haven't tried Paper Cement yet. Maybe that would work better.

George

Try hot glue, George.

I display special edition cereal boxes. I carefully undo the bottom flap and donate the un-opened contents to a local food bank and then re-seal the bottom with hot glue - does the trick.

Richie C. posted:
George S posted:

 

I have had problems with the new Lionel LCT boxes. The glue doesn't hold on most of them. I've tried re-gluing with not so good results. I haven't tried Paper Cement yet. Maybe that would work better.

George

Try hot glue, George.

I display special edition cereal boxes. I carefully undo the bottom flap and donate the un-opened contents to a local food bank and then re-seal the bottom with hot glue - does the trick.

Thanks for the suggestion. I need to try that. My wife has a gun, but I don't and have never tried it.

George

MikeH posted:
George S posted:
Nation Wide Lines posted:

I recall once throwing out some 1930s American Flyer boxes, which I hated to do.  However, a previous owner had left them out for their dog or cat to pee on and they reeked so bad that I could not throw them out fast enough.  

NWL

I don't think there is a good way to clean pee off cardboard. Also, once cardboard gets wet, it will be damaged pretty fast. 

There is a whole business in reproduction boxes. There's a guy in the orange hall at York who had a whole multi-table setup. It was mostly postwar boxes if I recall.

I have had problems with the new Lionel LCT boxes. The glue doesn't hold on most of them. I've tried re-gluing with not so good results. I haven't tried Paper Cement yet. Maybe that would work better.

George

George, try contact cement or spray adhesive.  Apply it to both surfaces, wait 30 seconds, then join together.  I've fixed quite a few that way.

When I first began to read MikeH's post, I thought he was recommending contact cement or spray adhesive to clean pee off cardboard!  

Then I realized he was commenting on the last part of George's comment.  LOL

Andy

 

When they were passing out brains, I thought they said trains and I asked for a slow one.

A lot of Marx original sets survive intact, or almost, because all but cheapest sets and later wind-up ones in cheap cardboard, came in sturdy boxes that were ideal to store the set when not in use.  And so many Marx sets have been found in their original boxes and good condition.

??Another one of THOSE!!??  What you want to sell is not what I want to buy!

  I use the boxes for extra insulation in my attic.

CHOO-CHOO MIKE

High Plains 3 Railers at the 

Sherman Hill Train Show

Cheyenne, Wyoming

May 16th and 17th 2020

 

 

I have always kept "set boxes" especially those with artful box tops or lids.  However, I agree with the comment on Marx boxes, they are sturdy for sure but for a number of years the box lids were pretty common and plain. If I am going to display a car and I have its component box, I tend to "collapse" the box (sometimes I have to handle the inner sleeve separately or sometimes it goes to trash (Horrors!") and store it flat.that way I have the box should I ever want to sell or trade the car but it takes up less space.  Now after almost 50 years of trains, knowing what boxes I have...that is a different story

Don  

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