Skip to main content

Whatever the vintage the person that built the H10 in the photo's above did a very nice job.   The Saginaw/Central Locomotive Works H10 kits evolved in design and materials over the 40+ years they were offered.  It would be helpful for prospective buyers to know some spotting features when they are considering purchase of a finished model.    With comments by modelers on the forum hopefully we can flesh out the evolution of the Saginaw/CLW H10  product line like  was done with CLW diesels last year.

Engine chassis:  one piece cast brass >  2 piece frame with multiple spacers 

Drive: open geared main driver > enclosed gear box (cast brass > later plastic??)

Drivers: cast iron > lost wax brass centers, steel tires  > industrial plastic centers, steel tires, pickup wipers

Tender: sand cast body > photo etched sheet brass body (2 versions, high side Lines West, low side Lines East)

Motor:   open frame permag visible in the cab. (Were early Saginaw wound field?  Did late CLW H10's use Pitman can motors?)

Detail parts - many changes over the production span - late production CLW castings were very nice

 

IMO the most desirable version of the Saginaw/CLW H10 kits was 1970's CLW offering featuring lost wax driver centers and a detailed sheet brass tender.  

 

PS : Recently I was searching for CLW PRR brass H10 tender trucks and contacted CLW owner Lou Houlemarde.  Although  the trucks were out of stock he had  the side frame masters and arrange a small production run for several fellow PRR modelers - thanks Lou.   

Last edited by Keystoned Ed

Good question - which ones are missing fireboxes?

#1 is CLW.  My first O Scale kit locomotive (other than A-N Diesels).  From Bob Smith, 1979.

#2 -Saginaw G5 - a little rough; I am just its caretaker.

#3 - Hybrid  - CLW boiler, lengthened, Saginaw frame, sprung.  Scratch tender.  Lobaugh drivers.

#4 - Saginaw

#5 - same as 3, but with a Walthers coach in tow.

#6 - Saginaw E6

All H10 Consolidations use the same boiler casting.  The hybrid Atlantic is simply the H10 casting with a 1/4" spacer (Atlantic is longer than the Consol).  The Saginaw G5 and E6 use different cab and boiler castings, and use sheet metal fireboxes.

 

 

There is a story that I have heard that CLW locos have a tendancy to have a hitch in the valve gear, ie not run smoothly.    I have 2, an older one I got sorta built up and a kit I bought around 1980 that is not built up.    Both of mine run smootly.   I did not build the mechs on either one so I can't take credit.   So I don't know if the above is an urban legend, or based on some evidence among modelers.   I did not hear it applied to Saginaw locos.

Just looking for a digital photo of the I1 - turns out that it pre-dates my digital camera!  Easy to fix - maybe this week.

I note that PRR had commonality all over the place - boilers for E6, G5, and H10 are almost identical.  Boilers for K4, L1, and I 1 are likewise similar, and I take advantage of those facts.  My I1 is a Scale Craft K4 boiler, slit in the belly and widened five scale inches in diameter.  Its frame is a modified Lobaugh Berk with CLW H10 drivers and rods.  Tender was dirt-easy - no rivets!

@bob2 posted:

Just looking for a digital photo of the I1 - turns out that it pre-dates my digital camera!  Easy to fix - maybe this week.

I note that PRR had commonality all over the place - boilers for E6, G5, and H10 are almost identical.  Boilers for K4, L1, and I 1 are likewise similar, and I take advantage of those facts.  My I1 is a Scale Craft K4 boiler, slit in the belly and widened five scale inches in diameter.  Its frame is a modified Lobaugh Berk with CLW H10 drivers and rods.  Tender was dirt-easy - no rivets!

I would LOVE to see that.... 

Mark in Oregon

Add Reply

Post
OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

www.ogaugerr.com
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×
×