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@Farmall-Joe posted:

Did you try rolling it the opposite direction?

Yep, that's the ticket!

The best thing about aluminum screen IMHO is its dimensional stability -- it tends to hold its shape without external support, which is really needed for plastic screening or cloth mesh options. It can also be a downside, as you found out. if you can, unroll enough to do your project, then reroll it a bit tighter in the reverse direction, then release. Any remaining bow can either be flattened out when attaching it to the frame, or you can place the 'low' ends on supports and put a small weight in the middle for a while, to bow it a bit back in the opposite direction. It's a bit fiddly to get it right, but the results can be worth it IMHO:

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This is a lumber yard I put chain link fence around. I looked for an easy way to accomplish this and I came up with using Woodland Scenics Fencing.  It was not expensive and came in sections with the fence supports. Also included in their package are gate sections.  I used a piece of sheet rock as a base and sections of the fencing came with extension's that will anchor the fencing in place. Once installed, I used a sand colored tile groat over white glue to make the yard driveway. The lumber building was scratch built and detailed.  One caution when ordering the fencing, make sure you identify you need "O" guage. I bought several HO packages not paying attention and it wasn't clearly marked.





spor 1

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@Forty Rod posted:

Alright, I may have jumped the gun on this.  I used Rustoleum light gray spray primer and followed it up with flat steel spray over that.  Here it is eight days later and the stuff is still tacky damp.

Suggestions  and comments on what I did or didn't do to create this?

Mmm, did the primer coat dry fully first (like overnight)? Was it non-tacky? Are the primer and paint both good when used on other surfaces?

I'd suggest a few tests on scraps of the screening. One (or both) of the coats may not be playing well with the plastic screen material, and/or the paints themselves may have gone bad or not been mixed properly. If all else fails, try using water-based paints like acrylic.

Okay, here are the results:  Five different paints, all are still sticky.  Temperature is at 70 degrees and humidity has been right close to 75% the whole time.

Haven't tried acrylics yet and I really like the look of Testor's (Rustoleum)  aerosol spray best

Could it be the nylon I got from Amazon?  Maybe some kind of coating?

Should I wash the nylon next time before I spray?

I'm still looking for a solution and am open to any suggestions.

@Forty Rod posted:

Next question: this is going to be around a factory building and I'm looking at an 8 foot high fence.  Does that seem too much to anyone?

Not at all. An eight-foot fence (a couple of inches high, at O scale) seems pretty much a minimum in a commercial setting IMHO. It's really a matter of how important it is (for security and/or safety) to keep the hoi polloi out. If you're not clear, perhaps you can do some research to find photos of the prototype structures and industries you have in mind, and see what is typical IRL, to either validate your instincts or offer guidance on what *is* typical. In any event, the only result that really matters is what pleases you . . .

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OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
800-980-OGRR (6477)
www.ogaugerr.com

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