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I'm hoping someone here can re-write this for helping others if you agree with it.

 I've had more than one engine now and even an upgrade, if I remember correctly?, that has needed a conventional reset to run correctly. The most recent one, actually shocked me. It was right after upgrading my TIU and trying to run an already built consist, where the lead engine got locked in reverse. I've had another that right out of the box needed a reset. Finally, I'm thinking that an upgrade I did myself, needed a reset after installing a soundset where it just didn't take fully. The reset got it straightened out and running correctly.

 So I'm thinking that this should be a go to idea for engines that appear to be locked up when testing in conventional mode. Maybe an engine that won't add to a remote for example, should be tested in conventional mode to see if it exhibits this behavior.

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For a problem engine I always start off trouble shooting in conventional using a Z-4000 with amp meter.  If engine does not respond within normal amperages I know there is issues.  I always do the conventional reset.  This is especially important for PS-3 as some memory setting are stored differently for direction lock.

How the engine responds when power applied in conventional is also important.  If engine moves IMMEDIATELTY as power is applied, that usually means there is a shorted motor lead, or possible FET short on board.  Especially if engine can't startup with sounds and such.

If the engine starts moving after startup or a few seconds after power applied that usually is a locked engine.  For PS-3 I leave the voltage low at 8-9V until engine sounds fully start up, than I do a Reset 1W and 5B or an Unlock 1W and 3B.  For PS-2 the engine normally has to be in neutral to do a reset, so I do an unlock (this also applies to Loco Sound engines). 

After engine is running fine in conventional, move to dcs and test and do a factory reset. 

For PS-3 I have seen locked in neutral, forward and even reverse for conventional operations, even though they run fine under DCS.  G

Joe,

So I'm thinking that this should be a go to idea for engines that appear to be locked up when testing in conventional mode. Maybe an engine that won't add to a remote for example, should be tested in conventional mode to see if it exhibits this behavior.

I think not. What does being unable to add to a remote have to do with being locked in a direction or in neutral?

If the engine exhibits an issue under DCS regarding being locked in a state, then the engine should be tested in conventional mode.

There are several reasons and solutions that are specific to an engine being unable to be added to a DCS Remote. All of those should be attempted first to remedy that specific problem.

While George's explanation is concise and completely valid, note that the first thing he said was:

"For a problem engine I always start off trouble shooting in conventional..."

It appears that George does a conventional reset as a matter of course for every repair. However, nowhere in his explanation does he indicate that the reset cures an engine that won't add to a remote. Rather, he's primarily discussing directional issues.

Last edited by Barry Broskowitz

I still think what I say is valid.  If your testing in DCS you have several different scenarios that can play out and two of them leave you not knowing for sure if the engine is good or bad.   For PS-2 and PS-3 if an engine stays silent and doesn't add you could have a dead board. Or a board that catch watch dog and stays silent but won't add.  A conventional test can rule out the dead board.  If an engine misses watch dog and starts up, but still can't add or operate you still do not know if board is good or bad.  With conventional test you know whether it operates or not.  Once clearing that hurdle you can move to the DCS test at least knowing the board and engine fully function in conventional and having completed a reset.

As far as not loading.  I am of the mine to delete engine from remote, clear any lash up it was in and than try to add.  If no joy do a recover engine.  Still no joy use a dedicated test track and clear out ID one in the remote too and try again.   If all that fails you have to take the shell off assuming you have wired your TIU correctly and other engines work fine.  G

George,

As far as not loading.  I am of the opinion to delete engine from remote, clear any lash up it was in and than try to add.  If no joy do a recover engine.  Still no joy use a dedicated test track and clear out ID one in the remote too and try again.   If all that fails you have to take the shell off assuming you have wired your TIU correctly and other engines work fine. 

I agree completely. That's pretty much what I meant by the following:

There are several reasons and solutions that are specific to an engine being unable to be added to a DCS Remote. All of those should be attempted first to remedy that specific problem.

Last edited by Barry Broskowitz

yes i bought the engine brand new in 2002-i changed the battery with a bcr years ago and the engine has performed great until a couple of weeks ago there is a small click when i apply power coming from the tender but no sound or lights in the past, when i have had a board go bad there are  lights and/or sound but no movement and since mth is not performing any service on their products because of shutting down next month and their are no shops that have replacement boards or perform upgrades from ps2 to ps3 i am at a loss especially since it is my favorite engine and that it cost me 1,400 dollars i just want to run it and not display it but what bothers me is the small clicking noise coming from the tender thxs

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