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Go to a hardware store and get a cheap plastic miter box, a hacksaw with a good blade, and some clamps.  

I agree!  A four or five dollar plastic miter box will insure your cuts are square.  Unless you have 30  or more to cut, a cutoff saw would be an overkill.  I never needed a clamp but it would insure the shelving stayed in the right place while cutting.

Good luck,

Don

@Dave45681 posted:

+1 for hacksaw.

All you guys suggesting big bulky power tools read the part where he was moving into an apartment, right?  

Possibly Not a lot of spare space for a chop saw (or band saw, etc) he will probably not have much need for other than this task.

-Dave

Tell 'em Dave. Talk about overkill. Shouldn't take more than a minute with a sharp blade. Surprised no one has suggested using a laser.

Pete

David 45681

@Dave45681 posted:

+1 for hacksaw.

All you guys suggesting big bulky power tools read the part where he was moving into an apartment, right?  

Possibly Not a lot of spare space for a chop saw (or band saw, etc) he will probably not have much need for other than this task.

-Dave

The above are merely suggestions.  By your comment above you are making assumptions not in evidence.  How do you know he does not have access to a chop saw at his current home or through a friend or family.  

The gentlemen asked a question and various members made suggestions, he will chose what works best for his current situation, 

Having  a couple hundred feet, I always just used a Hacksaw and held the shelf with one hand and the saw with the other. I use a square and draw a pencil line and cut. NEVER have I had a crooked cut or problem with mating to the next shelf. Hack saw I use is one I purchased 45 years ago at least from the Snap On Dealer. Just use a good blade and tighten!

@Adriatic posted:

I might cut them in half or 75/25 etc. so maybe the scrap could be reused someday.  (or make a one car display shelf for a desk or workbench or hallway wall upstairs, etc.)

I agree with the thought to cut them in lengths that allow for the re-use of the cut sections.  I purchased c. 900 feet of used aluminum shelving many years ago and some of it was cut to various lengths.  I did have a number of sections that were too short to re-use and I eventually recycled them.  They were cut to lengths of 6 inches or less and were useless.  Luckily most of the cut sections worked out well with my wall lengths.

NWL

I believe the Website has a cut charge for those, who would like the pieces, to be cut-to-length.  $1 per cut.   

Call, to check availability of material, and cut-to-length charges. 

Note that shipping charges can be pricey, the 6ft lengths, are a UPS problem. 

Longer than 6ft. There are split/roll pins provided to splice the shelves.  

My shelves.   Click to access pictures. 

Last edited by Mike CT

Still, file edges so you don't cut yourself capping them. 

Years ago I would likely have used a Porta-band with chopsaw type base for something like this.(know any plumbing/mechanical/HVAC folk?)

Careful if you grind vs cut, aluminum snags discs hard(& brass, copper). You should really have a disc just for aluminum.  Many metals should really take their own type of grinding discs. Some discs can even change metallurgy at the cut. Stainless for instance can loose it's stainless properties with a regular old Superbond discs.  And beware of the big box fat discs. Buy industrial, wear that shield and be able to yell for help.  ....please.

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