Can this material be cut without destroying the whole building?  I want to change a portion of a wall.

Tom

Original Post

Never a guarantee. Best bet is a diamond blade, light pressure and water to cool it as you go. 

 

"Of course we know its O-gauge or no gauge." -- Sheldon Cooper

Ceramic Floor/wall tile saws are readily available at tool rentals and the big-box stores.   No guarantee on the cut.    These saws usually have a move-able base and water pump.  A  sloppy process at best.  A floor or wall tile doesn't go-right, you pick-up another and start over.  Rental usually includes a charge related to the blade diameter and use.   My sweethearts kitchen remodel included a ceramic back splash over the counter.  The tile installer and I worked a long day to complete the cut install.  Another day was required to grout the tile and do clean-up.  Quite a work out.  The saw and saw mess was outside, Cut pieces required up and down the stairs/ split entry home, for just about every cut.   

I once drilled into the base of a porcelain village piece with a masonry bit to put a light in it (wasn't designed for a light, cavity too small).  The base was really thick and I gave up after making about 1/2" depression.  If I remember correctly, I used oil in the process and heating was an issue.    So I opted to discretely glue a grain of wheat bulb under the roof overhang and painted out the wires that I led to the back.   I would experiment, with one of the Dremel wheels for porcelain, on a piece you might pick up at a thrift store .  If the piece cracks, you can always glue the thing back together.  If light bleeds through the repaired crack, paint over the filled crack with acrylics to obtain whatever level of translucence or opacity  you need, thin layers of paint at a time, while the piece is illuminated. 

Last edited by Joe Rampolla

I have cut into the bottom of Department 56 buildings many times.  I have also cut windows out to put glass in place of the random openings. You will need a dremel and a diamond wheel, about 18 dollars for the wheel.  It cuts like warm butter.  I have never cut into a Lemax building but I would assume it would be the same. Make sure the building is secure and wear safety glasses.  You will also need a shop vacuum running because it creates a lot of dust. I have never used water, just had some one hold the vacuum with two extensions right behind the wheel. 

Last edited by Keith k

Sounds a bit iffy for my skills and patience.  I'll look for a different way to make changes without altering the original structure.  Thanks for the info, folks.

Tom

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