Skip to main content

They are easy to build, for someone new the biggest challenge is painting and weathering them. The instruction that come with the kits are very good and they tell you how to paint and weather. I believe Down Town Deco has videos on their web site. I would pic a small easy one to build for your first project. There are many details you can also add. They are some of my favorite kits. This "House of Redemption" is an easy kit to put together. I chose to have it abandoned so I installed broken glass, boards across the broken door and used tan nylon stockings for old screen windows. Hope this helps. Don.   drunk last man standing

Attachments

Images (1)
  • drunk last man standing
Last edited by scale rail
@JimJohnson posted:

I've found some Downtown Deco Buildings on Ebay, that I think would look good on my layout. I'm wondering if anyone has some pictures, or building advice about these kits. Easy to build? Look good on your layout?

 Thanks!

I picked up 4 through Stout a while back. They are quite different than any of the plastic models. They are cast plaster (white) so epoxy is recommended to assemble. My painting and finishing skills are quite rusty so I have been finishing Ameritown and Korber plastic buildings first. There is so much more detail in these cast buildings it it quite amazing. Downtown Deco's website has detailed instructions on how to assemble and finish. The First Timer Bar and The Chop Suey buildings are billed as being easier to build and finish.  The are a couple of sponsors who also sell these. You might want to check them out as a quick check of eBay listings show they are more expensive than buying through a sponsor. I can't wait to start one of mine. BTW if mine end up looking half as good as Don's - I will be a happy fellow!   Jeff

Downtown Deco kits are my favorite brick structures.  I have finished 8 so far.  I'm still looking for some of the out of production kits (anybody want to sell their burnt-out fireworks factory kit?) The attention to detail in the castings make them the most realistic brick structures in O scale.  Broken bricks, cement patches, and peeling stucco give that well-worn look.   The assembly and finishing instructions are very detailed and easy to follow.  The First-Timer Bar (below) is a great starter kit to get your feet wet.  I finished it using DD's instructions. Kwik Key is the same kit that I finished in a darker red brick finish.  See my article Better Bricks in OGR Magazine Feb/Mar 2020 for more finishing hints.

2018-09-17 21.18.30

DD's Bus Depot is out of production but I eventually found one at a show.  I masked and painted it in Greyhound colors and added the letters from an office lobby signboard. I found a laser-cut rooftop sign at York.

Work carefully in gluing the 4 walls together.  You may need to flatten the joining surfaces with a large flat file, then epoxy them together and check for squareness before it dries.  If the castings are warped, don't force them.  Plaster does not bend. You can use downspouts to hide the seams.

Bob

 

Attachments

Images (1)
  • 2018-09-17 21.18.30

Ive built a number of these. Start with a small one that you can get inexpensively... the First timer, Burkowski Liquors... something like that with 4 plaster walls. They glue together easily, but the fun is in the painting and detailing. Typically they come with signage and stuff, or you can just as easily make your own. Theres lots of ways to paint them up, none of them are wrong, but if you follow Randy's suggestions in the kit box you can get yourself something pretty nice. 

Like everyone said, you cant force the parts, they'll crack. Most of the time you can just glue things back together unless you get something that just explodes. Even then you can make a save with some joint compound or spackle. 

@ScoutingDad posted:

I picked up 4 through Stout a while back. They are quite different than any of the plastic models. They are cast plaster (white) so epoxy is recommended to assemble. My painting and finishing skills are quite rusty so I have been finishing Ameritown and Korber plastic buildings first. There is so much more detail in these cast buildings it it quite amazing. Downtown Deco's website has detailed instructions on how to assemble and finish. The First Timer Bar and The Chop Suey buildings are billed as being easier to build and finish.  The are a couple of sponsors who also sell these. You might want to check them out as a quick check of eBay listings show they are more expensive than buying through a sponsor. I can't wait to start one of mine. BTW if mine end up looking half as good as Don's - I will be a happy fellow!   Jeff

Can you give me a call regarding the Downtown Deco kits?  646-599-7871

i have 20-25 DD built kits on my layout. they are among by the most realistic, yet relatively easy to assemble kits. the key to making them look so good is in the painting and weathering and randy’s instructions will teach you how do do that, step by step. hydrocal provides some of the best casted details and while it’s forgiving in the panting and weathering steps it’s unforgiving in assembly. best to build on a cutting mat so that if you put down a wall casting with too much force, it won’t crack. but if it does, it’s easy to glue together and it adds to the character of the wall. however, if you drop it, it will shatter at which point, it’s probably toast. randy might help you with a replacement wall. you can use tacky glue or even white glue  (but set time for me, is too long). i use 5 minute epoxy and then brace the inside corners with 3/8” stripwood. take it slowly, read ahead on the instructions and you’ll have some structures which you’ll be very proud of on your layout. 

@Jerrman posted:

i have 20-25 DD built kits on my layout. they are among by the most realistic, yet relatively easy to assemble kits. the key to making them look so good is in the painting and weathering and randy’s instructions will teach you how do do that, step by step. hydrocal provides some of the best casted details and while it’s forgiving in the panting and weathering steps it’s unforgiving in assembly. best to build on a cutting mat so that if you put down a wall casting with too much force, it won’t crack. but if it does, it’s easy to glue together and it adds to the character of the wall. however, if you drop it, it will shatter at which point, it’s probably toast. randy might help you with a replacement wall. you can use tacky glue or even white glue  (but set time for me, is too long). i use 5 minute epoxy and then brace the inside corners with 3/8” stripwood. take it slowly, read ahead on the instructions and you’ll have some structures which you’ll be very proud of on your layout. 

Could you share some close-up pics?  It would be great to see what you did.

@DJEZC posted:

Could you share some close-up pics?  It would be great to see what you did

 

 most of my pics are of scratch built or kitbashed but i did manage to find a few very old DD photos. except for two, i had trouble leading the large photos but you can see the others by clicking on the small attachments to see the detail you can get with hydrocal castings. (i’d take new photos but i’m out of town for awhile). 

 

Attachments

Images (7)
  • mceclip0
  • mceclip1
  • mceclip2
  • mceclip3
  • mceclip4
  • mceclip5
  • mceclip6
Last edited by Jerrman

Add Reply

Post
OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

www.ogaugerr.com
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×
×