I finally have my layout set up how I think it will be for some time and am ready to start to run some wiring for things like all of my terminal sections, building lighting, accessories etc. but am concerned how to go about doing it. What I mean is that my layout table consists of 3/8" plywood topped by 2" extruded foamboard so how do I go about the business of drilling the holes? Is it a simple matter of buying a longer drill bit? I am worried that after punching through the foamboard and plywood, the chuck jaws will dimple the foamboard. Or is there a better, safer or simpler way to go about it? I know I am overthinking this but it is how I am....

Thanks!

John

Original Post

I did buy an extra long drill bit for drilling through my layout. I think it was about 8 to 10 inches long. I would go to a local hardware store for this instead of Lowes or Home Depot, which tend to cater to a mass audience. The hardware store might be a little more specialized.

I use a spade wood bit, usually 3/4" to allow a connector to pass up through. If the base is too small, I just decrease the size. Usually the base or ground cover will mask any dent. You could use a small piece of masonite with a hole the size of the drill bit shaft to take the thrust of going through the plywood.

John

Located in the real Upstate NY

This layout module looks relatively simple. 

Wiring required. 

Bottom/back side. 

Add (4 track) wiring. 

Non-derail and switch motor wiring. 

Red, White, Blue and Black are (4) track circuit power feeds, Green is common. Small white and red is non-derail and switch motor wiring. (3) and (4) are small track side dwarf lights.   

Most holes were done with a standard 1/4" bit,  a long "ringer" bit was used on occasion. 

Screw gun and associated driver tips. 

Assorted larger diameter drill bits. 

Hole saws for even  larger round holes.

And the big stuff,   18" Ship auger and Milwaukee "Hole Hawg" drill. 

Have fun making saw dust    Mike CT. 

 

 

 

Consider drilling larger holes than you think you will need as one is always adding more wires.  I would drill 3/4 to 1 inch holes with spade bits in the framing boards.  Then consider drill several extra holes maybe every foot or 18 inches in case you will need to run more wires or run wires to areas you are not now planing on needing.  It is not much effort to drill holes and much easier to do it during construction or at least before you have the board on the floor or on legs.

Charlie

You may want to consider number tags.     Number books can be purchased at the local big box stores.  White band has a number on each wire in this bundle, pulled over-top of a ceiling, one section of the layout, to another remote section.   White and black wires are track circuits. Brown 18 gauge solid thermostat wire is for switch control. Atlas 6924 relay boards and all associate switch input and output.   Some of the thermostat wire is dedicated to accessory power.   

 

In addition to number books you can use colored tape which is good when tracing a circuit at a distance with senior eyes.

Pre deck wire views 014

I am rewiring a earlier job and 12 wire colors, numbered tape as Mike mentioned and colored tape are of great assistance.

IMG_8413

In the above example, white tape indicates the yard tracks, orange, silver and green feed three different branch lines departing from the yard.

For intuitive understanding, I divided my around the wall layout into nine 22' +/- sections.  Each section is numbered in a ten numeral grouping such as 20 to 29  or 50 to 59 and so on.  So at a glance I know which group of wires go to which area of the layout.

One additional thought,  I pre bore 1 1/8" chamfered wire management holes in all bench work cross members.  Typically one continuous series of holes for each right of way.   Some larger jobs can require up to a dozen holes in busy areas to accommodate all circuits.

Inital glue and clamping of right rear module 001

Just makes servicing easier.

Also, consider prewiring your layout as much as possible before installing any decking,  lessens the  maneuvering around under the platform.

Pre deck wire views 007

Sorry, the photo will not rotate properly.

Colored wire helps make sense of this diode matrix.

IMG_6962

 

Eternity is a long time to have been wrong.

Attachments

Photos (5)
cubalz posted:

I finally have my layout set up how I think it will be for some time and am ready to start to run some wiring for things like all of my terminal sections, building lighting, accessories etc. but am concerned how to go about doing it. What I mean is that my layout table consists of 3/8" plywood topped by 2" extruded foamboard so how do I go about the business of drilling the holes? Is it a simple matter of buying a longer drill bit? I am worried that after punching through the foamboard and plywood, the chuck jaws will dimple the foamboard. Or is there a better, safer or simpler way to go about it? I know I am overthinking this but it is how I am....

Thanks!

John

If you want to drill a few small, unobtrusive wiring holes through the foam & plywood, you can make your own drill bit out of some piano wire.  Get some 1/8" or 5/32" diameter piano wire (or whatever size you desire), and cut to length as needed.  Grind a sharp chisel point on one end, and there you have it.  A homemade drill bit.

You might start your hole locations with an ice pick through the foam, then use your bit to drill to finish going through the wood.  I've done this before and it works pretty good.  Cheap, easy, and effective.  Hey!  Them's my three favorite words!  

Paul  

Ship Rock Island ROCKET FREIGHT

 

2 Rails?  3 Rails?  Doesn't matter, I can't count that high anyway.

I love the smell of fresh-brewed creosote first thing in the morning.

It sounds more tedious than it actually is:   It is easier now to really go over your plans, once, twice, and wait a few days, and again a third time.  Remember the golden rule:  "Measure twice, and cut once".  Ask me how I know this, but especially when it comes to wiring'...

Mainly, have fun, and Good luck building your layout'... 

 Quarter Gauger 48'

   

Td 

 

Home Depot has a nice line of Bosch Spade bits in assorted sizes. You can buy them separately or in sets.

This 1-1/4" bit is only $ 6. It is 6" long. You can also buy an extension if needed.

bosch-spade-drill-bits-dsb1017-64_1000

Sean

 

TCA 14-6985#

 

Buy me a ticket on the last train home tonight.


Attachments

Photos (1)

Add Reply

Likes (0)
Post
OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

www.ogaugerr.com
×
×
×
×
×