Simon Winter posted:
jonnyspeed posted
 

So why don't you stop YELLING at me long enough to realize that I am advocating for you. Bet you feel silly now! Or are you just that grouchy? Maybe because your trains have no sound... Studies show (probably) that people who's models have sound are happier with their hobby. LOL J/K

Better go see a Doctor if the printed words are yelling at you, you have problems! As for needing YOU as an advocate, I hope I never get that desperate. Where do you find your studies, Mad Magazine?

Sorry I didn't see your first comments....maybe we are not that far apart, but I still don't need sound!

See ya Speedy

Sparky (aka Simon) 

Just so you know Sparky... I mean Simon...  When you type in ALL CAPS on the internet, that is commonly known to mean you are yelling or shouting. 

I still need sound! But I hope you enjoy your silence too 

See ya Sparky 

-Jonathan

 

Frank McCabe posted:

B&O Columbian startup.  (Sorry the acceleration is a bit too fast!)

Beautiful set, even if the sounds aren't exactly spot on accurate. Maybe its the video, but I don't hear 4 12cly 567 prime movers and 4 generators. The colors seem to match the cars fairly well. All in all a really nice diesel by Scott for the price. Each model seems to get better and better.

-Jonathan

 

Ed Kelly posted:

Frank,

Great shots!  Thanks!

What is the radius of the curve in the movies?

Regards,

Ed

Hi Ed,

The radius of the Rockford O Scalers inner loops (which are straight DC operation) are 88” (inside) and 92” (outside).  Most of the passenger train videos are taken with them running on the outside (92” radius) curves, but either of these double track mainlines will handle any length equipment including locomotives.  When laying out the track work, attention was also paid to the track spacing (distance between the center of each track to one another) to preclude any chance of interference on the curves.  And spiral easements on the curves were used to improve operating characteristics.

A second set of tracks were built around the “inner” DC layout and they operate exclusively on DCC.  They also feature broader radius curves including one that is 132” radius and super elevated as well.  Passenger trains can really roll through these curves at scale track speed!

In the pictures below, the B&O Cincinnatian is on the 92” radius and the California Zephyr is on the 132” super elevated radius curves.  Our recommendation is to use the broadest radius possible when laying out your track work.

 

74DD94CF-3C98-4372-9D88-B3FD3DE65323

D9EC5CDB-7589-4151-8EFE-FF4DCA9B41AA3831B381-0646-4FF2-BD54-1F60DECDEF38

 

 

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Frank,

Thanks for the videos and the information.  Your RR is spectacular.  

I am 17 years into the building of my RR.  I have 72" minimum radius with 4 3/8" separation on these curves with easements and superelevation.  I have a few 100" radius curves and a couple around 120".  These broader radius curves have 4" o.c. and are eased and super elevated.  You are so right.  The broader the curve, the better the trains look.

Wishing you continued success.

Regards,

Ed

Ed Kelly posted:

Frank,

Thanks for the videos and the information.  Your RR is spectacular.  

I am 17 years into the building of my RR.  I have 72" minimum radius with 4 3/8" separation on these curves with easements and superelevation.  I have a few 100" radius curves and a couple around 120".  These broader radius curves have 4" o.c. and are eased and super elevated.  You are so right.  The broader the curve, the better the trains look.

Wishing you continued success.

Regards,

Ed

Thanks for your comments, Ed.  It sounds like you have some great track work on your layout.  Maybe we should start a new forum post on this subject!

Regards,

Frank

What these later posts in this thread emphasize, is pretty basic. The wider that you can make your radii, the better your operation will look. Back a zillion years ago when I first got interested in zero scale, I read (probably in the late "O Scale News 48/ft") that 72 inch minimum radius was the de facto (actual) number that ANY model engine could handle. Simply stated, that meant any loco you might purchase would be able to navigate 72 inch or larger radii. That's a thought that is NOT trotted out often enough these days. Soooooooooooo unless you have a bit over 12 feet of space.............

Simon

Regarding Mr.McCabe's post below, I neglected to say, the LARGER you can go the better!

Thanks Frank!

Interestingly, when the Rockford O Scalers first formed back in 1973 with the intent to build a modular layout to set up at train shows, all of us were previously in HO Scale.  

Not knowing any better, one of our members suggested we simply double the popular HO radius of 30” and 32” for our curved module sections and that’s what we did.  However, it didn’t take long to realize that these 60” and 64” curves were not suitable for running mainline passenger trains with 85’ scale cars and large steam locomotives which is what we wanted to do.  We could get the passenger cars to run around these curves but they looked toy like doing so but some of the locomotives simply would not negotiate them at all.  Consequently, we rebuilt the curve modules using our current 88” and 92” radius.

Obviously, the choice of curvature is predicated on how much space is available and the type of equipment one wishes to run.  Simon’s suggestion of 72” radius is probably a good compromise if space for larger radius curves is not possible.

sdmann posted:

All our projects are designed to negotiate 48" Radius 2 Rail O Scale

and 072 (36" Radius) 3 Rail Track, with switches and turnouts (S Curve).

And they also traverse 054 (27" Radius), 90 deg simple curves.

That brings rise to 2 questions: How much of the accuracy of the model is sacrificed to make it possible, and how silly does it look going around those sharp turns?

Simon

PS: Note Mr. McCabe's post directly above.

Santiago;

Beautiful they are, especially after you have done your enhancement magic.  And speaking of enhancement, I have had no luck in finding a roof mounted bell that would be suitable for the ATSF E6.  Any guidance from folks would be much appreciated.

Allan

Allan E posted:

Santiago;

Beautiful they are, especially after you have done your enhancement magic.  And speaking of enhancement, I have had no luck in finding a roof mounted bell that would be suitable for the ATSF E6.  Any guidance from folks would be much appreciated.

Allan

Allan,

I just picked up the correct bell from Bill Davis last week for John Handlogten’s Santa Fe E-6s.  I can furnish the part number tomorrow as I am not currently at the layout.  John will probably post pictures of it once he has installed.  We think it’s going to look great.

Frank McCabe, The Rockford O Scalers 

 

Great pics as always, Santiago!  I don’t believe Scott made the Packard, but that’s a fantastic model too.  We have some similar Packards on our layout.  As their advertising slogan once said, “Ask the Man Who Owns One”!

Do you think Scott would make this Packard Inspection Car for us? !!!!! 😊

EB9B9C59-34D8-4A4A-8CD5-0A1E41530E2C

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