Rusty Traque posted:

https://www.cnn.com/2019/07/23...ows-train/index.html

Sorta reminded me of a commercial in the 60's where a station wagon using a certain brand of gas (I don't remember which brand) towed a couple of freight cars and a caboose.  You could hear the tires squealing as they slipped.

Rusty

It was Sunoco with there 160 or 260 high test gas. remember the ad. Also running up the ramp in LA coliseum.  

As a friend asked where do they get a strap rated for a Million pounds? 

 

This is really just tractive effort correct? I would assume someone or group of guys on the hand brakes to stop the cars. May speeder can pull a load of ties or cart of stone, good luck stopping though. 

That's not really surprising to me. Roller-bearing trucks roll very easily. It's all about the tractive effort required to get it moving. The thing I was concerned about is getting those racks to stop once they're moving.

Matt Jackson
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I recall a 1956 Dodge commercial with a car pulling four Union Pacific streamlined passenger cars.

As to the strap, some railroads supply locomotives with straps instead of chains, in case it is necessary to move a car with the drawbar broken on the "wrong" end to set it out, in the nearest siding or spur.  Chains are heavy, and the use of them carries more injury risk than use of the strap.  Usually, one employee has to do all the work of chaining or strapping the bad-order car to the drawbar of the one ahead.

Tom

 

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The Panhandle & Santa Fe Railway Co.

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AGHRMatt posted:

 The thing I was concerned about is getting those racks to stop once they're moving.

All you have to do is have the brake system charged, then dump the air.  The air can be dumped from a tail hose connected to the last angle cock.  The cars are going slow enough that flat wheels aren't an issue.

Rusty

Another point:    The electric motor has better low end torque, than a gasoline/diesel motor.  The combination of electric/traditional motor, allows for better low end performance.  Most hybrids, at least my Prius, always, first moves in electric mode, before switching to standard power.  Battery technology has improved, manufactures are still a bit reluctant to use the LiPo, (Lithium Polymer) batteries, best stored electrical power to weight ratio.   There is a fair amount of education required about this technology, that is just now part of marketing.  A light duty truck,  20 or 30 miles per gallon, would sell.   IMO,  Mike CT. 

I don't think an electric motor has any more torque per se than a gasoline or diesel loco at a given rpm.    A transmission allows the operator to adjust the motor torque to the required speed/load.

As for hybrids always starting with the electric motor, that is simply software.    They are p rogrammed to use the battery first before going to gas to increase the rated gas mileage.    So if the battery has any charge, the program uses the electric motor until it is below usable level.      This process gives them the best gas mileage short term since it uses electric power first.

prrjim posted:

I don't think an electric motor has any more torque per se than a gasoline or diesel loco at a given rpm.    A transmission allows the operator to adjust the motor torque to the required speed/load.

As for hybrids always starting with the electric motor, that is simply software.    They are p rogrammed to use the battery first before going to gas to increase the rated gas mileage.    So if the battery has any charge, the program uses the electric motor until it is below usable level.      This process gives them the best gas mileage short term since it uses electric power first.

Maximum torque for an electric motor is at stall. Once it starts spinning, torque falls off. Thats why a lower horsepower Tesla can blow away a supercar with 2-3 times the horsepower in the quarter mile.

Pete

prrjim posted:

I don't think an electric motor has any more torque per se than a gasoline or diesel loco at a given rpm.    A transmission allows the operator to adjust the motor torque to the required speed/load.

The WHOLE point in using electric motors in final drive for the propulsion of heavy equipment is that by using volts/amps via an electric motor, you are essentially giving the vehicle an infinitely variable transmission.  

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