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I been thinking of  a way  to add a extra elevation also.

I want to add a prewar O guage train unit either by incorporating it  with the existing postwar  layout or  just make another layout on top of the layout for the prewar items  . I ran out of ROOM so its either sale the house or add above.

My attic has the 45 degree slopes  so I'm thinking of making custom brackets,  and  add another platform 30 or so high from the layout  and it would basically just hang from the ceiling

Or add supports and use the original layout table  for support.

Just wondering if anyone here has done a layout on top of a layout  or hanging over a layout pic or video  they can share .

This makes me remember the first (both LGB, and a just below ceiling loop), l saw in a restaurant in north central Missouri.  First place l saw either decades ago.  So how high is the ceiling?  Makes me imagine a long slowly spiraling climb from layout table top around the room's walls to just below the ceiling, to be able to run trains that are not chasing their tail, and then it would have to spiral down, with an interesting passing track section halfway up the wall.  For a separate loop, its height above layout base would be dictated by the height of existing or planned buildings (no grain elevators?), and, later, additional building height will be dictated by the height of the loop.

Is the upper loop is to be connected to the lower loop as a continuous loop? If so consider, consider the angle of upgrade (inclination) and the angle of downgrade(declination), usually recommended (2-3) degrees for both the upgrade and downgrade. The length of the upgrade and downgrade if established by the rise or height of the loop elevation and the angle(2-3) degrees. The length of upgrade or downgrade ramp can be a substantial. I used the trigonometric functions for a right triangle with an angle(rise/decline of 2.5 degrees) for different elevation heights. Given this angle, the lengths of the inclination/declination ramp from the lower track was established. Referring to a right triangle the rise is your elevation height, the run (base) of the right triangle is the length of ramp base. If you are not familiar with the trigonometric solution of a right angle go to www. omnicalculator.com on the web this will clarify any questions.

Last edited by John Ochab

Dennis,  That kind of just happened.  Not intentional.  In so many places it just seemed that there needed to be another switch or two.

Gun Runner John is just now discovering how easy it is to accumulate switches.    Several others on this forum have totals in this quantity range.  I do know in another OGR thread some one else mentioned they had 300 some switches.  The 105 was just the 2 rail, including the Ross 3 rail the total would be around 112.  GRJ will be at this level soon if I have anything to do about it.

Last edited by Tom Tee

The deck height of my layout's elevated loop is about 8". This allows for a 6 1/2" height clearance underneath, enough for even electric locomotives with raised pantographs to pass without issue. As you can see, the compromise is that it does not allow for the best visibility of the scenery underneath.

Elevated Section May 2020

If you intend to run a ramp between the upper and lower loops, each extra inch of height requires the ramp to be considerably longer. The ramp into my elevated loop rises 8 inches over 12 feet (all of the curved sections are level), producing a moderate grade of about 5%. Most of my locomotives can handle this with short trains.

Elevated Section Ramp

Attachments

Images (2)
  • Elevated Section May 2020
  • Elevated Section Ramp

I designed my 15x19 feet L-shaped layout for an upper level to show a Christmas theme with thirty-five Dept 56 North Pole Village pieces, some of which are animated. The upper level has three short trolley lines with Christmas-décor bump-and-go trolleys running on Lionel O27 rails. I didn't intend to place buildings underneath the upper level; just tracks.

As for height, I installed MTH Elevated Trestles as supports for the upper level. The ruler in one of the photos shows a five-inch clearance; it's sufficient for all my locos and rolling stock running on the lower level directly underneath the upper level. However, getting access to a derailed train along a stretch of track directly under the lower level can be somewhat inconvenient when trying to reach around the supports in limited space. Fortunately, derailments aren't a regular occurrence; thanks to the gentle curves (O42) of Lionel O-gauge tubular track and switches.

A train running on the lower level is semi-hidden along much of that route. The disadvantage is ... "showing off" a train in  action is limited for viewing. The track plan for both levels is attached along with some photos.

Mike Mottler    LCCA 12394

Attachments

Images (6)
  • Upper Level, West Wall - V: The trolley line along the west wall
  • Upper Level at five inches: Ruler shows clearance of five inches
  • Upper Level, South Wall: The trolley lines along the south and east walls
  • Upper Level, West Wall - H: The trolley line along the west wall, CU
  • MHM Layout, Level 1 as JPG
  • MHM Layout, Level 2 as JPG
Last edited by Mike H Mottler

I designed my 15x19 feet L-shaped layout for an upper level to show a Christmas theme with thirty-five Dept 56 North Pole Village pieces, some of which are animated. The upper level has three short trolley lines with Christmas-décor bump-and-go trolleys running on Lionel O27 rails. I didn't intend to place buildings underneath the upper level; just tracks.

As for height, I installed MTH Elevated Trestles as supports for the upper level. The ruler in one of the photos shows a five-inch clearance; it's sufficient for all my locos and rolling stock running on the lower level directly underneath the upper level. However, getting access to a derailed train along a stretch of track directly under the lower level can be somewhat inconvenient when trying to reach around the supports in limited space. Fortunately, derailments aren't a regular occurrence; thanks to the gentle curves (O42) of Lionel O-gauge tubular track and switches.

A train running on the lower level is semi-hidden along much of that route. The disadvantage is ... "showing off" a train in  action is limited for viewing. The track plan for both levels is attached along with some photos.

Mike Mottler    LCCA 12394

Sounds like our layouts are similar.  Mine is 10 x 20 with lot of D56 and trolleys in my city scenes.   The photo shows an elevated section about 9 inches about the base.

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