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Of course, we don't know "the rest of the story", yet.  And the train was traveling rather slow.  And the adjacent field looks like a nice soft landing area.  And it's adjacent to a road for relatively fast/easy response and recovery.

But, if those roly-poly tank cars maintained their tank-integrity and held their contents safely through it all, then kudos to their design/manufacturing. 

Just looking for the positives.

OTOH, they might want to heed that flippin' tie at the crossing!  It could've punched a hole in the passing car and created a much, much worse ending.   

Kudos, also, to the vehicle driver/passenger/railfan? who happened to be recording the event.  I hope he/she is rewarded handsomely for providing great documentation!

@dkdkrd posted:

OTOH, they might want to heed that flippin' tie at the crossing!  It could've punched a hole in the passing car and created a much, much worse ending.   



That's what the NTSB is for.  Bear in mind one cannot predict every possible action that takes place in a derailment.  A few seconds either way and that tie may not have split.  The age of the tie, ambient temperature, condition of the roadbed and the force and direction by which the tie is struck are all variables.

Rusty

About a week ago Virtual Railfan showed a crew installing a grade crossing like this one as part of their "grab bag", don't recall the exact date. I agree it most likely is a piece of that, and that it is either rubber or something with a rubber covering. The workers placed it where they wanted it and tapped it with I think a shovel to work it down into place. Something like this:

https://hirail.com/hirail-rubber-grade-crossing/

Last edited by wjstix

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