CTR is right,
Read your policy then if you can't find anything specifically stating NO
Call your insurance company and ask them.If they say no then ask them for a letter of denial and ask where it specifically states it in the policy.

I think what your referring to is the storage of flammable building products
Which actually your not doing.

Policies can work for you in a good way because it's all in writing.
I had a claim against my homeowners for a Ham Radio tower and antenna that was destroyed by wind .

In the policy it stated that"Antennas and their equipment are covered by this policy" But when I talked to my agent he said that was only TV antennas although it wasn't worded that way in the policy. I asked for a letter of denial which to them means "I'm gonna sue your fanny off" and an adjuster was there the next day with a check for 7 grand.

Weather it be yes or no get it in writing.

David
quote:
Originally posted by TrainheadMac:
I saw somewhere online that foam scenery material (i.e. pink or blue foam) can cause your homeowners insurance to be voided. This makes no sense to me. Does anyone know anything about this?


You're right. It's hogwash. You see a lot of bologna online!






quote:
It's hogwash. You see a lot of bologna online!

So very, very true!

By the way...depending on where you live, the walls of your entire home may be filled with the pink or blue foam. A small amount used on any layout (and which is normally covered with plaster or some other such material) is no more a fire risk than most any of the other materials used in layout construction.

Read anything you care to online, and believe about 5% of it.
The people who perpetuate these myths always refer to building codes. Those codes apply when a material such as the foam is used in the actual structure of the building, that is, to provide insulation by completely covering the walls. Then, it is supposed to be covered by a specified thickness of drywall. We are using it as a craft supply - totally different.

Sort of like the electrician friend who informed me that my track wiring didn't meet code because my splices weren't in a junction box.... and, boy, was I in big trouble. When I mentioned that all that wiring was at 18 V max, and the only 110 V under the layout was the transformer plugged into the wall outlet, he muttered something about "everything has to follow code"....amazing. He doesn't do electrical work for me! Wink Big Grin

Jim
quote:
Originally posted by Allan Miller:
quote:
It's hogwash. You see a lot of bologna online!

So very, very true!

By the way...depending on where you live, the walls of your entire home may be filled with the pink or blue foam. A small amount used on any layout (and which is normally covered with plaster or some other such material) is no more a fire risk than most any of the other materials used in layout construction.

Read anything you care to online, and believe about 5% of it.


Isn't it a good thing that plywood and 2x4's aren't flammable?

Big Grin
quote:
When I mentioned that all that wiring was at 18 V max, and the only 110 V under the layout was the transformer plugged into the wall outlet, he muttered something about "everything has to follow code"....amazing. He doesn't do electrical work for me! Wink Big Grin


Well, maybe everything *does* have to follow code. But ask him if he has ever read the part of the NEC about the difference between Class 1 and Class 2 wiring.

Yes, Amazing.

--pete

 

 

My heart is warm with the friends I make, 

And better friends I'll not be knowing;

Yet there isn't a train I wouldn't take,

No matter where it's going.

                        Edna St. Vincent Millay

 

Usually of more concern are furnishings. Carpet, furnature, drapes, wall coverings, etc. That old sofa in the corner of your basement will burn quite nicely and put off a lot of toxic black smoke. My house built in the late 70's has a urea-formaldahyde foam board, under the brick and vinyl siding, that is covered with a silver foil on both sides. You see a lot of isocynate foam board used in the roofing industry. A lot of interesting stuff out there, most all to save energy.

I would have a current code 110 volt interconnected, with battery back up, smoke detector system installed, if it isn't already there, and ask your insurance agent for the discount. That is one smoke per level and one in each bedroom. In some cases, voice evacuation is required, and many times a Carbon monoxide detector can be installed as part of the system. Interconnection allows all the smokes to sound at once. The thought is that even with all the ear busting noise kids don't hear when in a sound sleep but will respond to a voice. Surprisingly all this stuff is available at either big box store and requires a three wire with ground cable between each detector. IMO This does more than anything else.
The house insurance ban on pink/blue insulation refers to exposed wall insulation, as soon as its covered with drywall, its ok. The restriction refers to the ability of flame to spread on the exposed surface. Since no one leaves the pink/blue exposed on the layout, usually covered with hydrocal or at least latex paint, its covered.

As usual, check with the people that will deny the claim.

As a side, some of you might remember the large layout that was built as a business in the Mall of America in the early 90's. Construction was going well till the fire marshal decided that all the structure had to be unistrut, a heavy duty METAL support system, similar to the metal racks at Home depot. This was before metal studs came into use on layouts. Needless to say the cost over-run forced early closure.

Swav

Chicagoland Lionel Railroad Club

New Lenox, Il.

clrctrains.com

Not considering code or insurance issues. Burning foam gives off choking poisonous smoke, period.

Sheets of plywood and 2 x 4 legs are perfect kindling wood to throw heat at the unfinished bottom side of any foam scenery. Just be aware of the potential hazard complications in case of a fire.

If you have a house fire you more than likely will not even be thinking of what you used to build the layout years before. Therein lies the problem. Out of sight out of mind, just like your 401k.

Structure or hobby, code or no code, insurance or no insurance. You may very well be code compliant but when sucking foam smoke, dead is still dead.

Hot Wire instructions advise not to use a hot wire on foam without excellent ventilation. Even best to do it out side.

We have been using foam for residential construction and model railroading for many years. Just know that the extra vulnerability is there.

As far as insurance issues. Insurance companies take a dim view of non code work. If you bugger your own non inspected, non permitted 220 service up grade some companies will balk at covereage. If you mess up on a restricted plumbing job and there is a loss, same thing. As was said earlier. Know you policy, coverage and exclusions.

Use a public adjuster for losses if you are not satisfied with the company offer. Even the threat of using a public adjuster may get a company adjuster to be a bit more generous.

You would be suprisede at the coverages that can be found in the average policy.

When there is a gray area the law requires the decision to favor the insured.

Eternity is a long time to have been wrong.

I don't have the knowledge or experience to comment on the use of foam versus other materials for fire safety, but I remember reading a post on some forum quite a while back, and found an old bookmark about it.

If you follow the link, someone did some informal tests on blue/pink foam versus white styrofoam. After reading the information, I am very leery of using white styrofoam products.

foam flammability

I just had another thought, what about all the product boxes stored under the layout by many hobbyists? Many of the boxes have white styrofoam packing materials.
Flamability of the product from a match is but one perspective.

What the product does in the presence of a traveling fire is another issue altogether. Throw a piece of building foam into a burning outdoor fire pit.

Eternity is a long time to have been wrong.

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