Skip to main content

If you want to recreate the image of the PRR in the 40's through 60's, Brunswick green with the stripes is the way to go.  I've seen hundreds of PRR trains between 1949 and 1967.  during that time we regarded the various other schemes as oddities.  The single gold strip was a tragic occurrence

The color schemes used to publicize certain trains didn't mean a specific set of locomotives was used for those trains.   I general, each train got the engine that was first out on the ready track when the crew came on duty.

Some motors had regular assignments. The sole R1 class, 4999 generally worked the westbound Broadway Limited to Harrisburg, returning to New York on a mail and express run. She was retired in 1958.

Did you mean the Washington Union Station affair ?

Yes, of course. The Federal, with engineer Bower at the controller of motor 4876.

I wish there was a sarcasm tag sometimes.

Still trying to figure out which path the train would take from Penn to GCT.  North on 8th and east on 42nd, or west on 34th and north on Park Ave. 

Correction: That would be east on 34th, not west. Short sleep.

Last edited by Nick Chillianis

Yes, of course. The Federal, with engineer Bower at the controller of motor 4876.

I wish there was a sarcasm tag sometimes.

Still trying to figure out which path the train would take from Penn to GCT.  North on 8th and east on 42nd, or west on 34th and north on Park Ave. 

Nick,

You left that one wide open! 

How did the Federal get from Penn Station to GCT?

By subway of course......

Any freight trains that you saw would have been to or from Oak Island Yard which is two miles south of the Newark station.  There was no reason for a freight train to go north of that junction.  Not likely that there would ever be a unit train on that part of the railroad because there were no appropriate destinations for a unit train.

BTW, after April 1, 1976, they were Conrail trains.  PC was no longer in the railroad business.

I would visit Philly to see a college buddy during the years 1966 through 1969 and remember seeing the venerable GG1 in action pulling passengers and mixed freights along the mainline,I guess.  Being from Western PA I remember being just blown away by those electrics.  My buddy would just laugh!

Norm

Any freight trains that you saw would have been to or from Oak Island Yard which is two miles south of the Newark station.  There was no reason for a freight train to go north of that junction.  Not likely that there would ever be a unit train on that part of the railroad because there were no appropriate destinations for a unit train.

BTW, after April 1, 1976, they were Conrail trains.  PC was no longer in the railroad business. 

Oak Island was a Lehigh Valley facility.  Never had any catenary.

Electric hauled freight came off the corridor at Lane Tower at the south end of the former PRR Waverly Yard complex. From there it could go one of two ways. The first was was to pass under the massive LV bridge to skirt the north side of Oak Island on the P&H branch to Meadows Yard in Kearny. The other route skirted the south side of Oak Island through a facility called the Garden Yard, then joined the Lehigh Valley at the east end of Oak Island to cross the Upper Bay Bridge which crossed Newark Bay, to ultimately reach Greenville Yard and its carfloats. Both lines were electrified the whole way. After Conrail decided to route their trains off the Amtrak corridor, the former Lehigh Valley main became their main route into the area. That's when Oak Island became Conrail's main facility in the NJ/NY area. 

Don't know of any unit trains per se, but GG1s definitely hauled Pennsy's crack "Trailer Trains" and also long strings of automobile racks.

 

Don't know of any unit trains per se, but GG1s definitely hauled Pennsy's crack "Trailer Trains" and also long strings of automobile racks.

The intermodal terminal was at Kearney.  It is east of Newark station but those trains used the freight cutoff.  It left the main line at Waverly, went along the north side of Oak Island and was next to the Pulaski Skyway for a short distance before it crossed the Passaic River on a drawbridge.

I traveled that part of the Skyway west many times when Dad was driving to somewhere west and that was the main express highway west from the Holland tunnel -late 40's, early 50's,  I never had the good luck to see a train on that track.

One reason for that was that the Conrail operating department was trying to eliminate electric operation as fast as they could, limited only by the capital funds available to complete dieselization.  They weren't going to waste a lot money on painting electrics.

Only one GG1 was painted in the complete Conrail blue scheme, the original #4800, Old Rivets. Others received small CR initials and had the PC two-worms-in-love logo painted out. A few retained their DGLE paint and the single gold stripe while having all previous railroad names painted out (4883, for example). The ones owned by NJ Transit got stenciled "N.J. Dept. Of Trans. Owner" under one number on each flank (to the right when viewed from the side). Amtrak units either got the stylized Amtrak name in white, or some got painted in a clownish red, white and platinum mist scheme with a blue wide stripe that mimicked the PRR wide stripe.

Okay, I thought long and hard and it finally dawned on me, The GG1s most definitely pulled at least one unit train on a semi-regular basis. A very well known unit train. The twice-weekly, 60 car long, insulated boxcar Tropicana Orange Juice train.

It's original terminal was at Meadows Yard in Kearney. 

The train was regularly handled by GG1s, E44s or sometimes a combination of both types of motors.

Add Reply

Post
OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

www.ogaugerr.com
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×
×