I just received this in yesterday's mail:

300...

It's a very nice example of this iconic engine. I already had a 300, but this one was less than $30, so I figured "what the heck"?  This tender is simply stamped in (small letters) "Reading". My other 300 has the small "Reading" logo and "American Flyer" on its tender. So what's up with that? Both both have the link-type couplers.

Very much like my earlier model, this runs REALLY well: in fact, this actually runs a bit better: has a lower starting speed (about 4 volts) and is a quiet runner...which I like in my locos. 

My best guess is this is close to (or slightly over) 70 years old, and is another example of  (in some ways) the superior qualities of Post-War trains...

Happy Fourth to you and yours!

Mark in Oregon 

 

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When I first got into S gauge, I really longed for one of the large steam engines to power my trains.  In the 80's the cost of Hudsons and Northerns was way out of my price range however.  So I bought two of the plastic bodied #300 locos and made an adapter so I could double head them.  Looked great pulling a long train on the clubs display layout.

I still have those two and I still run them now and then.  Really great runners, quiet and dependable.

Rolland

RLaHaie posted:

... So I bought two of the plastic bodied #300 locos and made an adapter so I could double head them.  Looked great pulling a long train on the clubs display layout.

I still have those two and I still run them now and then.  Really great runners, quiet and dependable.

Rolland

Indeed they are; although I find the earlier metal-bodied examples (especially the 4-piece models with reverse units in the loco) are quieter still. All just great locomotives, for sure. 

Mark in Oregon

The tender pictured is 1946 production, not real common. It looks like the coupler has a black weight on it, that is 1949 and newer, so someone changed it. The 1946 coupler has a thin shank and no weight. Look at the valve gear on the engine closely. 1946 engines have round head rivets, 1947 and newer used hex heads. I think I see the reverse unit sequencer lock lever sticking up from the boiler, that is correct for 1946 and 1947 engines. If you ever disassemble the engine there will be a date stamp inside the boiler shell. This is most likely a 1946, nice find.

Tom

Thanks Tom.

Actually, there is no weight on the coupler; it's just a really crappy picture.   The reverse unit is inside the boiler; and the valve gear rivets are indeed round.

In any case, I feel fortunate to have scored such a nice older piece; the fact that it runs so well is an added bonus. 

Mark in Oregon 

The NASG (Nat'l Assoc. of S gaugers) has a really nice website that has about as complete a listing of everything done in S-gauge as anyone (I suppose one could check it against Greenberg's pocket guide...).  Here's their page for the 300:  http://www.nasg.org/SProductGa...ltype/index4-4-2.php and it appears that what you have is the middle loco shown in the picture - indeed from 1946 or possibly 1947 as Tom said.  David Doyle's book - 'Standard Catalog of American Flyer Trains' sez that with the flat sheet-metal tender sides, its the second of six variations of the #300 - produced in 1946 and into 1947.  The first variant, produced early in 1946, had indentations on the sides of the tender where "Reading" was stamped.

 

richs09 posted:

The NASG (Nat'l Assoc. of S gaugers) has a really nice website that has about as complete a listing of everything done in S-gauge as anyone (I suppose one could check it against Greenberg's pocket guide...).  Here's their page for the 300:  http://www.nasg.org/SProductGa...ltype/index4-4-2.php and it appears that what you have is the middle loco shown in the picture - indeed from 1946 or possibly 1947 as Tom said.  David Doyle's book - 'Standard Catalog of American Flyer Trains' sez that with the flat sheet-metal tender sides, its the second of six variations of the #300 - produced in 1946 and into 1947.  The first variant, produced early in 1946, had indentations on the sides of the tender where "Reading" was stamped.

 

I think you're right; guess I got lucky yet again.

Thanks for the link to that website; very informative. Through it I learned that my #310 is a 1946(!) example...and it runs beautifully too. 

Gotta love these old models...

Mark in Oregon

Also the 1946 production the chassis have two brass buttons In the chassis. Yes round rivets 1946 only. I have a 1946 with the indented tender. I what did is to drill thru the smoke stack add a red cellophane under the stack. Also the inside of the stack is painted white. What you have is a red glowing stack. Try it .

...ah, those "brass buttons"; I had wondered about that.

My #310 has those; this 300, like my other example (with the "AF" tender), does not. So perhaps what I have here is a slightly later loco that's been paired with an earlier tender....(?)

Not that it really matters; this is a great old engine. 

Mark in Oregon

Okay, thanks. 

FWIW, I just now noticed that the "brush plate" on this unit is the same odd "dijon mustard" color as is on my (for sure) 1946 #310, so I guess that makes sense...(?) My other 300 has a black plate, which matches my other locos (300AC, 312, etc.)

I find this kind of "detective work" on these models fascinating...

Mark in Oregon

PS: I have a couple of "Midgage" cars coming in the mail, so be prepared to field questions about those too. 

Indeed Atlantics seem to be the Red Haired step-child of Flyer steam engines.Many people dismiss them due to the fact they were starter engines.Unlike Lionel Scout engines they are great performers and most run and pull as well and sometimes better than larger configured engines.I sell Flyer at local train shows and the running joke is you can tape a $20 bill to an Atlantic and at the end of the show it is still unsold.Prices between $15 and $35 are the norm unless you come across a 299......

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