Skip to main content

Replies sorted oldest to newest

Originally Posted by Steve "Papa" Eastman:

... Love the colors in the little Overland Flyers and Sunshine Specials. As you can tell in my photo's, most of my Hafner is the later Streamliner types. ...

 

Steve

you sure are right about the colors of Hafner.  having every style might fit on a small wall, but every color combination would likely fill a warehouse.

 

i like your extra long passenger trains.

standard sets typically came with only three cars.

 

Haf1110Blue-1024

 

another favorite of mine, this color combination is the only one listed in the Greenberg guide as a lighted 5½" observation.

 

cheers...gary

Attachments

Images (1)
  • Haf1110Blue-1024

Hi all,

 

I inherited my dad's O gauge sets, and pulled them out after Christmas.  Some need some parts or are missing items, so they didn't make it under the tree.  In any event am hunting for a Hafner locomotive, and with the help of traincollectors.org  I am told I have a blue 2000 set, which just happens to be the blue red and silver guy 4th row in Mr. Eastman's  wall of Hafner 2.

 

Since I am very new to tin plate, I was wondering if anyone can point me to some good places to look for my missing loco?  I also have a bunch of 6" four wheel Marx.  Naturally the loco is missing/bodyless in this set.

Geez, I thought I was the only nut that liked this stuff! Have only two sets, a later freight set, and a streamliner like Mr. Eastman has on the shelf, it is in decent shape, traded some Lionel repairs for the price of it, and think I got a bargain. These two and my prewar American Flyer whistling Blue Streak boxed set are my non-Lionel prizes.

Just got my first Hafner set here at York.  A blue 1110 steamer with assorted freight cars.  

 

It came without a key.  It seems to take the threaded variety.  Will a threaded Marx key have the same thread size or do I need to find a real Hafner key?  There seem to be repro Marx threaded keys available but no Hafners?

 

Steve

The white background really makes the colors stand out which is duly noted. Hafner was my introduction to clockworks and they are seriously underappreciated except by the true connoisseurs.  I need shelves myself but to install them I have to rearrange everything but like you, having stuff in boxes bugs me as it negates having the stuff and it bugs me. Your display looks terrific. Just got a #30 Hornby 0-4-0 and it's the longest running one I have and has reverse. The weird thing is I bought it cheaply as the seller said the spring was broken. It wasn't.  How can you get mixed up with a loco running versus not running? If the couplers were not so high mounted, they could be coupled to the Hafner cars, without modification, hence my mentioning it.

Bruce

 

Hojack

I have a spare Hafner key if you still need one..send me an e-mail if so. I'll dig it out.

Last edited by electroliner
Bruce
On the Hornby's, the reverse & brake levers can confuse some, especially if it is only partially engaged. Sometimes it just needs a little harder push or pull.
 
Steve
 
Originally Posted by electroliner:
 Just got a #30 Hornby 0-4-0 and it's the longest running one I have and has reverse. The weird thing is I bought it cheaply as the seller said the spring was broken. It wasn't.  How can you get mixed up with a loco running versus not running? If the couplers were not so high mounted, they could be coupled to the Hafner cars, without modification, hence my mentioning it.

Bruce

 

Hojack

I have a spare Hafner key if you still need one..send me an e-mail if so. I'll dig it out.

Hafner Manuafacturing(Chicago, Ill) made windup trains from 1914 - 1951.  They went out of business in 1951 and the company was purchased by All Metal Products Company(Wyandotte, MI), the makers of Wyandotte brand of stamped metal toys and they produced the trains until 1956 when they went out of business too.  The tooling was then purchased by Marx and sent to Mexico. 

If you look closely at the 3 photos of my train you will see that the Hafner name is still used on the sides of the engine and tender along with the round Wyandotte Trains logo on the front and side of the engine.  The gondola and caboose also have the round Wyandotte logo.

Steve, your Hafner collection is terrific, and looks great on the shelves. That's one brand that I've never focused on, and it is truly underappreciated.

 

The caboose below I believe to be Hafner. I got it in a collection of other items, but kept it since its marked for the C&NW, one of my favorite roads. Its a little banged up, but I like it.

 

Thanks for all the pictures, everyone!

 

HO cabooses inventory 004

Attachments

Images (1)
  • HO cabooses inventory 004
Thanks John. Yes your caboose is Hafner.
 
Steve
 
 
 
Originally Posted by jay jay:

Steve, your Hafner collection is terrific, and looks great on the shelves. That's one brand that I've never focused on, and it is truly underappreciated.

 

The caboose below I believe to be Hafner. I got it in a collection of other items, but kept it since its marked for the C&NW, one of my favorite roads. Its a little banged up, but I like it.

 

Thanks for all the pictures, everyone!

 

HO cabooses inventory 004

Here's the little set I picked up recently, with Bruce's key completing the set.

 

The livestock and gondola do not say Overland on them - just "Peerless Stock Car" and "Sand and Gravel"; are they Hafner?

 

No markings of any kind on the tender, and it's a different color than the loco.  Would the set have come like that?  Also, no couplers on the caboose, so I need to look for one.  They look like Joyline couplers!

 

PICT0003

PICT0004

PICT0005

 

 

Attachments

Images (3)
  • PICT0003
  • PICT0004
  • PICT0005

Hojack,

Thats a great looking engine. Shades of The Blue Comet! I'm pleased to be able to assist. Nothing worse than a clockwork without a key. I felt that Owen was kind to make a key for the AF Hiawatha clockwork so I wanted to pay his generosity forward if any opportunity arose. My favorite Hafner engine is identical to David's but has a Lehigh Valley "John Wilkes" sort of scheme and it's somewhat similar to Overland Flier's engine.  I electrified the yellow version.

 Bruce

Last edited by electroliner

Gary, thank you very much for posting these photos.  It helps put them all in context for me.  

 

I really enjoy these very simple older pre-war 4-wheel (no trucks!) cars.  I discovered the Marx 4-wheel cars first, and thought they were unique.  Then I found American Flyer sets and got all excited.  Finally I realized that Lionel and Ives, make that everybody, made these little cars at one time.  More recently I got into the Hornby British version of tiny, 4-wheel lithographed cars.  

 

The Hafners have a charm all their own.  There is an ingenuity and simplicity of design that is really appealing.  They are almost whimsical, like the Joy Line freight set with it's Eagle Eye caboose and Venetian Gpndola and so on.  I mean, Peerless Stock Car, who thought of that?

 

Do any of you know of a good Hafner reference book?  There is no Greenberg on Hafner??

 

Post
OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

www.ogaugerr.com
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×
×