I have tried various combinations to get an Atlas switch button controller to work Lionel 031 & 072 switches.  The switches work with standard lever controllers.  I've checked the slide button controller with an atlas switch and it works.  I'm definitely missing something.  I'm powering the switches with a separate 12v power, i.e. not track power.IMG_1531

Matt

 

CEO of the SENHRR - The Live Free or Die RailRoad.

Life is short, play with TRAINS!

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First off, I don't have any of these atlas controllers so these instructions are based off web research. You will also want to use a meter to test this before hooking it up.  

I found this great diagram that someone else made and this should get you most of the way there; however, there are three items you need to follow to make this work 

1- your 12V power supply must be correctly phased with your track power supply. 

2- the blue wire shown in this diagram will connect to the "fixed voltage plug" in the side of your 022 switch and there will not be any connection to the middle of the three posts on the 022. 

3-the black wire in the diagram must be connected to the common terminal of your 12V power supply which must also be connected to your track outside rail (this is where having properly phased power supplies is necessary). the red wire must be connected to the transformer terminal for 12V. If using a ZW the black would be "U" or common and the  red would be The corresponding A, B, C, or D post.

Make sure track power is turned to 0V but the transformer on. With your meter set to AC volts, measure from the fixed voltage plug to one of the outer posts, you should see 12V when you activate the atlas push button (try the push button in either mode if doesn't work the first time) If you get this far and so far you things seem to work, then turn up the track power and repeat this test to ensure you still get only 12V. If this also passes, you should be all set  

 

I like the various different Atlas electrical switches for different model railroad applications, but I don't think the HO switch control contacts are robust enough to handle the current for an O22 switch for very long. You can try it but I suspect it will soon arc the contacts, and it's inconvenient to take those switch controllers apart to try to repair them. Why not use more heavy-duty push buttons?

enginEErjon posted:

First off, I don't have any of these atlas controllers so these instructions are based off web research. You will also want to use a meter to test this before hooking it up.  

I found this great diagram that someone else made and this should get you most of the way there; however, there are three items you need to follow to make this work 

1- your 12V power supply must be correctly phased with your track power supply. 

2- the blue wire shown in this diagram will connect to the "fixed voltage plug" in the side of your 022 switch and there will not be any connection to the middle of the three posts on the 022. 

3-the black wire in the diagram must be connected to the common terminal of your 12V power supply which must also be connected to your track outside rail (this is where having properly phased power supplies is necessary). the red wire must be connected to the transformer terminal for 12V. If using a ZW the black would be "U" or common and the  red would be The corresponding A, B, C, or D post.

Make sure track power is turned to 0V but the transformer on. With your meter set to AC volts, measure from the fixed voltage plug to one of the outer posts, you should see 12V when you activate the atlas push button (try the push button in either mode if doesn't work the first time) If you get this far and so far you things seem to work, then turn up the track power and repeat this test to ensure you still get only 12V. If this also passes, you should be all set  

 

Jon

I'm using a ZW-c  with Lionel Digital Volt/Amp meter display and both TMCC & DCS.  I'm using post A for the Mainline & post D for the Shortline.  I'm using post C for switch power set at 12 volts (can get to 18v if necessary). So far everything is phased correctly.  I do have a digital meter to do the final checks.

Thanks for your efforts in finding the diagram as well as the step by step instructions.

Best regards,

Matt

 

CEO of the SENHRR - The Live Free or Die RailRoad.

Life is short, play with TRAINS!

Ace posted:

I like the various different Atlas electrical switches for different model railroad applications, but I don't think the HO switch control contacts are robust enough to handle the current for an O22 switch for very long. You can try it but I suspect it will soon arc the contacts, and it's inconvenient to take those switch controllers apart to try to repair them. Why not use more heavy-duty push buttons?

ACE

I have 14 of these switch controllers that were given to me by an HO operating friend.  I have 10 switches to power up.   I'll try using EnginEErjon's suggested advice.  If that fails then I'll try another method, including going with the original Lionel switch controllers.

Best regards, 

 

Matt

 

CEO of the SENHRR - The Live Free or Die RailRoad.

Life is short, play with TRAINS!

Matt,

the fact that you are using the same transformer for the track power and the switch power definitely simplifies things. You can skip the part about checking the voltages with track power at 0V and then above 0V. That step is only necessary to ensure that two separate transformers are phased correctly. In your case, if it is functional, then you should be set.

Ace does have a valid point regarding the switch contacts. You may not get 25 years of functionality out of these controllers, but they should work for sometime.  On my current layout, I am using some very small momentary switches and I haven't had any fail yet.

It will definitely be impacted by the number of times you activate the switch. 

Keep us posted on how things work out.  

I'm pretty certain you need to use a momentary switch with O22 switch machines.  If you don't return the slide switch to the center (off) position the solenoid is still powered and something will overheat. If one slide switch were to be bumped unknowingly it would be powering a switch machine.

Dan

NASME Model Railroad Club .....................................
212 Main St.
Stockertown, PA 18083
http://nasme.tripod.com

 

From what I can find online, the atlas switches are momentary. You slide the switch into the direction you want and once in location, it requires a press to physically close the electrical contacts. 

If this is not correct, then I completely agree with you that these would not work.  A non-momentary on-on, or on-off-on will not work with 022 switches without other pieces added to address the non-momentary nature. 

enginEErjon posted:

From what I can find online, the atlas switches are momentary. You slide the switch into the direction you want and once in location, it requires a press to physically close the electrical contacts. 

If this is not correct, then I completely agree with you that these would not work.  A non-momentary on-on, or on-off-on will not work with 022 switches without other pieces added to address the non-momentary nature. 

That is correct Jon.  You have to press the switches at either end for a momentary connection.  The center doesn't seem to have a physical stop to park it.  I will check each one b4 installing, since these are used.  

Thanks also to Dan65train for the caution.

 

Matt

 

CEO of the SENHRR - The Live Free or Die RailRoad.

Life is short, play with TRAINS!

If you have the #56 switch controllers, Atlas includes then for use with their O gauge switches and twin coil switch machines. They are momentary, but not center-off, they are off as soon as the button is released no matter the position. They are wired as shown in the link posted above.

I have been using these for a few years now with my Atlas O 3 rail switches with no problems. However, I have no knowledge of the Lionel switches, what they are or how they operate? If they are twin coil like Atlas, I would think you should be fine using the #56 switch buttons with them.

As far as I know, if one is using a separate transformer to operate switch motors, phasing is not necessary. The switch motor is only sharing the common leg of the track power circuit. Phasing is only necessary if there is a way for an accessory or an engine to bridge the gap and receive power from both circuits. 






Today was the day to try EnginEErJon's suggested method of wiring the switches.  The test candidate worked flawlessly at 10 volts.  I now have 10 switches to wire up.  The button switches take up much less space than the Lionel lever switch controllers.

Thanks to everyone for their input.

Matt

 

CEO of the SENHRR - The Live Free or Die RailRoad.

Life is short, play with TRAINS!

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It took awhile, but they are all hooked up and function correctly.  Next is hooking up the switches to the DCS AIU on the shelf below, per Barry's book.   I'm guessing I'll be finished by the end of summer based on other projects running in parallel. 

Matt

 

CEO of the SENHRR - The Live Free or Die RailRoad.

Life is short, play with TRAINS!

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gftiv posted:

Wait until one of the buttons sticks on and the switch machine burns up. Happens regularly in HO.

Thanks for the input..  That's probably why I got 14 of them for free.

Matt

 

CEO of the SENHRR - The Live Free or Die RailRoad.

Life is short, play with TRAINS!

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