Is Paul Fisher till on line?

I sent this email to Paul because of his Milwaukee Road knowledge.  Does anyone else have this information?

Paul Scott Mann GGD is going to make MR 21" passenger cars.  I have
asked for additional cars - about 15 cars total - and he seems up for
that. I do not know enough about MR cars and the Web is not much
help. The MR 261 group has only 2 actual MR shop built cars.
From your knowledge / books could you send me a list of car types/
/ names / and car numbers of Olympian Hiawatha cars that the MR shops built for around the 1947 era? Are you going to order any
of the cars? Thanks Bruce Clark

Bruce

Original Post

Hi Bruce:  yeah, I'm still herel  I don't think that I'm going to order any of the new GGD Milw Rd  cars because I really own well over 60 pass cars, now.  i was under the impression that the GGD cars were all heavyweight cars, and from what I've seen, they really are excellent.  My problem is that my heavyweight pass cars are from all the regular suppliers, MTH, Lionel, K-Line and Williams, and are all 17"cars.  Realize that they would not be actual scale length, having made that commitment already, plus the fact that my RR does incorporate some  pretty tight curves of about 66" in diameter,  I just can't see adding or changing everything now.

I do have quite a number of 21" streamlined cars, including those from K-Line, and they do look nice stretched out into a long train.  I fo wish Scott Mann well with whatever Milwaukee Rd cars he does produce.  Morning Sun books have the best, general discussion about Milw pass cars.  Of course, one problem for modelers is that the Milw had four distinctive styles of cars, all lightweight design, generally referred to by their introduction years:  1935, the original flat sided cars, 1936, the first cars with two ribs, 1939 with seven ribs plus a short run in 1942 with five, and then the post war, Brooks Stevens designed smooth side cars from about 1948.  You can really develop a huge fleet of passenger cars, trying to build trains using all of these designs!  Weaver, as you may know, did offer cars and sets of cars in 21" length in all of the pre-war car styles.  I have some from each.

Paul Fischer

Hi Bruce:  yeah, I'm still herel  I don't think that I'm going to order any of the new GGD Milw Rd  cars because I really own well over 60 pass cars, now.  i was under the impression that the GGD cars were all heavyweight cars, and from what I've seen, they really are excellent.  My problem is that my heavyweight pass cars are from all the regular suppliers, MTH, Lionel, K-Line and Williams, and are all 17"cars.  Realize that they would not be actual scale length, having made that commitment already, plus the fact that my RR does incorporate some  pretty tight curves of about 66" in diameter,  I just can't see adding or changing everything now.

I do have quite a number of 21" streamlined cars, including those from K-Line, and they do look nice stretched out into a long train.  I fo wish Scott Mann well with whatever Milwaukee Rd cars he does produce.  Morning Sun books have the best, general discussion about Milw pass cars.  Of course, one problem for modelers is that the Milw had four distinctive styles of cars, all lightweight design, generally referred to by their introduction years:  1935, the original flat sided cars, 1936, the first cars with two ribs, 1939 with seven ribs plus a short run in 1942 with five, and then the post war, Brooks Stevens designed smooth side cars from about 1948.  You can really develop a huge fleet of passenger cars, trying to build trains using all of these designs!  Weaver, as you may know, did offer cars and sets of cars in 21" length in all of the pre-war car styles.  I have some from each.

Paul Fischer

As an adendum to the above:  If Scott does go back and produce some of the pre-war, leightweight Milwaukee cars, I would think that he'd be using extruded  aluminum for the body shapes, punching different window patterns to replicate different cars.  If so, what I'd really like to see would be for him to make some "shorty" cars, appx. 30' or 35' length that the Milwaukee had constructed as "branch line combines".  These were really interesting cars that had the lightweight, streamlined bodies but actually had open platforms on both ends, could seat 24 passengers, were heated by coal stoves and lighted by oil lanterns and were found on the backs of many way freight ("patrols" on the Milwaukee) trains all though the system.  My freight trains are calling out for one or two of those special cars!

Paul Fischer

Add Reply

Likes (0)


OGR Publishing, Inc. PO Box 218, Hilliard, OH 43026 330-757-3020
www.ogaugerr.com
×
×
×
×
×