If so, how? Is it between hills or or on homemade supports or trestles? Looking for ideas.

Thanks, 

Joe Gozzo

Last edited by Trainlover160
Original Post

If you are planning on running Standard Gauge, I wouldn't use a graduated trestle to climb to it. You could run on an elevated trestle, but make sure the trestle is very sturdy. Standard gauge trains are heavy and the torque can cause shifting of the trestle.

George

George S posted:

If you are planning on running Standard Gauge, I wouldn't use a graduated trestle to climb to it. You could run on an elevated trestle, but make sure the trestle is very sturdy. Standard gauge trains are heavy and the torque can cause shifting of the trestle.

George

Thanks!!

TypeHxfmr posted:

Yes, it is elevated. It is in New York City and has appeared many times on TV and in programs.

Dick

So you have adopted the real one? I think Joe was talking about the one made by Lionel.

George

I too really like the look of a well placed ****gate bridge, but sadly, I have no space for one of these. Of the applications I have seen that look best to me, the use of a land mass was modeled, not a trestle system. 

Honestly, you may want to post some images of the space you are trying to install this on and maybe the forum can provide some feedback or options. I also have seen several used in a row, which is also very impressive.

Good luck.

Charlie

Charlie posted:

I too really like the look of a well placed ****gate bridge, but sadly, I have no space for one of these. Of the applications I have seen that look best to me, the use of a land mass was modeled, not a trestle system. 

Honestly, you may want to post some images of the space you are trying to install this on and maybe the forum can provide some feedback or options. I also have seen several used in a row, which is also very impressive.

Good luck.

Charlie

Thanks Charlie, wish I had room to string 2 to 3 of them together. I am doing layout l with input from Tom Snyder's layout. I have been leaning toward supports created for his bridge, but always looking for other options.

Joe Gozzo

Trainlover160 posted:

Thanks Charlie, wish I had room to string 2 to 3 of them together. I am doing layout l with input from Tom Snyder's layout. I have been leaning toward supports created for his bridge, but always looking for other options.

Joe Gozzo

Hey Joe:

Understood and good luck with the design. I would say to make sure the trestles are substantial looking enough to support the bridge ends (not sure what that part of the bridge is called) with all the concrete work.

What ever you choose, I'm sure it will be fine as the bridge almost stand alone as a focal point on any layout.

Charlie

c.sam posted:

Our was placed in a 14' viaduct that we installed on our garage layout. Very effective!

DSC01576DSC01630

Really nice Sam, Thanks!

Joe Gozzo

I meant to say it is also seen in many TV ads. I don't have a Hellsgate bridge, but I have Lionel's  newer version of a bascule bridge--I like it very much.

Dick 

Rob English posted:

Viaduct on one side... earth on the other... and they're twins!

That’s fancy. Is the platform on the left side of the picture custom? Did you make it out of wood? If so, it’s pretty fine work.

George

Obviously not a Hellgate  but the same principle applies as to what you were asking. I just used some scrap 2x & 1x I had and covered with simulated brick paper.DSCN0952DSCN1062DSCN1182DSCN1181DSCN0057 [2)

Attachments

Photos (5)

For now, my Lionel 305 Hellgate is part of the duck-under for my "in-the-round" layout. Being a 305, it accommodates a double-tracked O-gauge mainline, which is sweet:

Definitely the highlight of the layout, the idea that these were made as toys still amazes me.

PD

George S posted:
Rob English posted:

Viaduct on one side... earth on the other... and they're twins!

That’s fancy. Is the platform on the left side of the picture custom? Did you make it out of wood? If so, it’s pretty fine work.

George

Thanks George... I had it custom cut by TW Trainworx.  They do great work.

 

Prewar Tin...Any maker, any gauge, anytime!

Last edited by Rob English
Rob English posted:
George S posted:
Rob English posted:

Viaduct on one side... earth on the other... and they're twins!

That’s fancy. Is the platform on the left side of the picture custom? Did you make it out of wood? If so, it’s pretty fine work.

George

Thanks George... I had it custom cut by TW Trainworx.  They do get work.

 

Ahh, yes! They did a very professional job. Great cut and finish. I'm trying to imagine how they cut the railing with such precision and detail. Definitely some high end power wood working tools and a master craftsman. I assume they used a high end scroll saw. An Excalibur 30" can run over $1000. Even after the cut, the sanding and painting are furniture quality.

George

George S posted:
Rob English posted:
George S posted:
Rob English posted:

Viaduct on one side... earth on the other... and they're twins!

That’s fancy. Is the platform on the left side of the picture custom? Did you make it out of wood? If so, it’s pretty fine work.

George

Thanks George... I had it custom cut by TW Trainworx.  They do get work.

 

Ahh, yes! They did a very professional job. Great cut and finish. I'm trying to imagine how they cut the railing with such precision and detail. Definitely some high end power wood working tools and a master craftsman. I assume they used a high end scroll saw. An Excalibur 30" can run over $1000. Even after the cut, the sanding and painting are furniture quality.

George

CNC Routing.  The majority is cut from MDF, some from plastic called Sentra.  I have over 100 hours in sanding those little slots and 20 hours in painting.  That being said, the work they did to bring my viaduct to life was outstanding.

 

Prewar Tin...Any maker, any gauge, anytime!

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