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@Mallard4468 posted:

That's a ridiculous stretch - it's obvious that it was referring to things that WE own, not someone else's possessions.  Sheeeesh.

No—they are things you'd suggest people play with, otherwise they would simply be collectables.

Anything that requires diligent attention to caution and safety in order not to accidentally maim or kill yourself or someone else, is not a toy. I'm all for guns, just not for calling them toys.

 

To All,

My view is that each person makes their own decision and value judgement on which of their own items are toys or not. This is not necessarily based on a monetary value. To some people a $10,000 item is a drop in the bucket and to others is a lot of money. Sometimes the greatest value can be items that were simply handed down by someone special, or a one of a kind item that was scratchbuilt by someone who has passed away. The most valuable item could be one that a person has built themselves. If you worked very hard to buy an item and place such value on it that you don't consider it a toy, that is fine. If you call all of YOUR own stuff toys, that is great too

What gets my attention is when people take the approach of telling others who don't think everything is a toy that they are "delusional." See Mallard4468 post below.

"When visiting with someone, most of us engage in politely allowing or ignoring that person's delusions."

Last edited by christopher N&W

I still like my trains but I'm not as enthusiastic as I once was, but if I were to look at it strictly from a $$$ standpoint I would say a $100 and up engine or passenger train or car, is not simply a toy.  All but a couple of pieces are things I would not hand over to my grandsons.  Maybe that's a good enough definition  for me...It's a toy if I let my grandsons play with and handle them.

No—they are things you'd suggest people play with, otherwise they would simply be collectables.

Anything that requires diligent attention to caution and safety in order not to accidentally maim or kill yourself or someone else, is not a toy. I'm all for guns, just not for calling them toys.

 

To All,

My view is that each person makes their own decision and value judgement on which of their own items are toys or not. This is not necessarily based on a monetary value. To some people a $10,000 item is a drop in the bucket and to others is a lot of money. Sometimes the greatest value can be items that were simply handed down by someone special, or a one of a kind item that was scratchbuilt by someone who has passed away. The most valuable item could be one that a person has built themselves. If you worked very hard to buy an item and place such value on it that you don't consider it a toy, that is fine. If you call all of YOUR own stuff toys, that is great too

What gets my attention is when people take the approach of telling others who don't think everything is a toy that they are "delusional." See Mallard4468 post below.

"When visiting with someone, most of us engage in politely allowing or ignoring that person's delusions."

Sorry that your feelings are hurt and that you can't admit that a grown man plays with toys.

TM TERRY: A train collector friend once sold Cadillacs and on two occasions we took out a couple of CTS-V's to go to lunch. They are much more luxurious and comfortable than a Corvette with the same large turbo engine. Top speed 185, twin Brembo brake cylinders on each wheel with multi-perforated discs, Recaro race seats, multiple surround sound Bose speakers and special windshield wipers for high speed use. Got one up to 90 per in just a few seconds on the interstate - awesome response! Computer controlled electronic braking system gives them amazing handling on curves! Luxury, power, speed and super handling all in one package!

Last edited by Tinplate Art

Do you go vrooooooooom?

If I'm doing it right, I just might 

But more likely I'd add some screetch noises to my stops

Being a toy doesn't negate responsible application of fun; it only notes it isn't a necessity. There may be legitimate need for a model in a plan, experiment, etc.. Without legitimate need, it is a toy by nature. 

Note in my view it has nothing to do with respecting the word "model" until we are actually talking about the pro and scratch modelers doing frame up originals at master levels. At that point you aren't likely to be concerned with what others think anyhow; rightly so.  We aren't the real modelers, they are  

If you pay for your model, you buy toys. 

We usually think of toys as thing made for children to play with, despite the phrase "men and their toys". I think that phrase crosses over into metaphor. We start to call things that bring grown men pleasure "toys", like boats, cars, and motorcycles. It's funny, unless you were very rich, the idea that a working man could have expensive things that had no useful purpose would have been unimaginable even a few generations ago. We are really a very wealthy society with disposable income undreamed of in the past.

I have inexpensive o gauge prewar tinplate. These were made as toys and and remain toys. Modern one thousand dollar model trains are only toys in the sense that sports cars are toys- metaphorically.

Well that is only my opinion, but it seems like a good definition. Made for children to play with- toys. Made for adults to play with- "toys".

Adriatic,

Thanks for the thoughtful response.

People do build models and people do buy models. A model is only a representation. It could be made of paper, clay, plastic or any material. Architects build models, or used to, that didn't include structural inside components  or anything. A model could be devoid of detail whatsoever. If one wants to call an MTH Railking K4 a model that is fine, the only thing left is to measure and discuss the accuracy and attributes of the model compared to the prototype. It'll be a matter of fact discussion. The people who are building the models Art is discussing are professional model builders. That you did not build the model does not disqualify something from being a model. I may be misunderstanding something you are saying also, but the fact that money has been exchanged to buy a model does not disqualify it from being a model.

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