Gentle Forum Members,

For those of you who were thinking about ordering a Long Island Duckling stock car from the Railroad Museum of Long Island . . . . . . . .

2001260 Long Island Duckling Catalog JPG croppedThere are five days left to order!  Orders for this unique, one of a kind O Scale toy railcar must be received by Monday, February 24th.

Please go to the Museum website:   https://rmli.org/toy-trains/collectible-cars/    to click on and download an order form.

For those of you who have ordered a car, THANK YOU!  We exceeded 268 orders today   For those of you who are still thinking about how to get your ducks to market, act today!  Your ducklings and we will thank you!!

Don Fisher, President
Railroad Museum of Long Island

PS - we are in the final phase of artwork acceptance for our next Lionel Collectible Car!  I can't yet divulge our partner until the paperwork is done, but I can give you a Long Island hint . . . . . . . . . "It will be a Sparkling Idea!"

TCA 08-63024

Attachments

Photos (1)
Last edited by n2qhvRMLI
Original Post
n2qhvRMLI posted:

Gentle Forum Members,

For those of you who were thinking about ordering a Long Island Duckling stock car from the Railroad Museum of Long Island . . . . . . . .

2001260 Long Island Duckling Catalog JPG croppedThere are five days left to order!  Orders for this unique, one of a kind O Scale toy railcar must be received by Monday, February 24th.

Please go to the Museum website:   https://rmli.org/toy-trains/collectible-cars/    to click on and download an order form.

For those of you who have ordered a car, THANK YOU!  We exceeded 268 orders today   For those of you who are still thinking about how to get your ducks to market, act today!  Your ducklings and we will thank you!!

Don Fisher, President
Railroad Museum of Long Island

PS - we are in the final phase of artwork acceptance for our next Lionel Collectible Car!  I can't yet divulge our partner until the paperwork is done, but I can give you a Long Island hint . . . . . . . . . "It will be a Sparkling Idea!"

Hi! My order form is in the mail. It may be a day or two late. Is that ok?  I ordered 1 car. Thank you 

Tinplate Art posted:

Just curious: did the LIRR have such a prototype? (NO criticism intended)  ☺

In the early 1870’s the first Chinese Peking Ducks in America were imported to New York City.  From that initial stock, a drake and three ducks were bred in Connecticut and found to be a hearty breed for the New World.

The streams and creeks of Eastern Long Island were ideal for providing clean, fresh water for ducklings to grow and thrive.  Thus, in the 1880’s a tremendous enterprise of duck “ranching” began on Long Island.  The succulent Long Island Duckling became the height of fine dining on steamships, railroad dining cars and the restaurants of New York City.  Our Duckling’s fame and tender meat spread across the country and World-wide - as far away as China!

Railroads built specialized stock cars for the transport of poultry.  The cars were similar in design to pig and cow cars but held shelving along the inner perimeter for the placement of cages holding the feathered stock.  A small room or shanty was built inside the car and a caretaker would ride with the fowl, caring for them, providing fresh drinking water and feed as they traveled to market.

In the early years of the industry, the Long Island Duckling traveled alive to market in New York City.  Eventually, a growing demand and improved technology lead to the harvesting of the ducks right at the ranch, their feathers were saved for down and they were dressed and placed in barrels for shipment to market.  Today’s Long Island Duckling is harvested, dressed and flash frozen, packaged and shipped to western markets in modern refrigerator trucks.

This Lionel "Scale O" railcar is reminiscent of the late 19th and early 20th Century type of car that could be used to transport Long Island Ducklings to market in New York City.  The road number, #384, is one of two road numbers assigned to Long Island Rail Road stock cars of the era.  Imagine yourself, an early “duck rancher,” providing succulent Long Island Ducklings to all the passengers on your layout’s “Broadway Limited” and “20th Century Limited” passenger trains!  You need this car on your pike to get your ducklings to market!!

Good morning all,

DJ'SOGAUGETRAINS, you're doing fine, orders are coming in right up to the final day and we wait a few days after that to make sure all last minute orders have been received.  Thank you for ordering.

ARTHUR, yes, the Long Island Rail Road rostered at least two "stock cars" in the late 1800's to early 1900's.  From the late Bob Emery's "Freight Car Roster:"

 

CLASS          NUMBER          BUILDER          SERIAL          DATE

          384          Unknown          1880
This is a wood frame stock car, shown in yard check books starting in 1880, retired by 1922.

          1st 3527          Unknown          Unknown
This is a wood frame stock car, listed as unfit for service as of 6/1914.  The full number series of this type of car is unknown.



In day to day use, the Long Island Rail Road might have transported any animal from cows/steers, horses, sheep, goats or fowl such as turkeys, geese, chickens and ducks in these cars.  Prior to ownership of the road by the Pennsylvania Railroad, the Long Island owned many types of freight cars that roamed the Eastern United States moving material on and off Long Island.  Once the PRR took over, freight cars became primarily PRR standard models and the older LIRR variety cars were sold, scrapped, or held hostage on Long Island rails.

As you can see, our stock car #384 represents the Long Island stock car that was retired in 1922.  We did take some artistic license placing "Long Island Duck Grower's Association" markings on the car as the actual prototype would have displayed L.I.R.R. or "Long Island Rail Road" markings.  In this case we are celebrating one historic agricultural form with this very unique car. 

Good question ARTHUR, it helps us to tell the rich story of Long Island Rail Roading!

Thank you,
Don

TCA 08-63024

GENTLEMEN: A sincere THANK YOU for the excellent history of the specialized stock cars and the duckling agriculture on Long Island. ☺

vita sine litteris mors est  (Seneca)

BWANABOB, are you anywhere near Whitestone????  You certainly are warm today sitting on that rock in the springlike sun :-)

TINPLATE ART,  You are most welcome, we really like to add a dash of Long Island history to each of our cars, it makes collecting them special.  Thank you for reading and enjoying!

Don Fisher

TCA 08-63024

Tinplate Art posted:

GENTLEMEN: A sincere THANK YOU for the excellent history of the specialized stock cars and the duckling agriculture on Long Island. ☺

One plus with the demise of the duck farms on L.I. is the elimination of the  smell you experienced when passing by the farm, believe me it was strong.

Hi, Hi, ARTHUR!

Yes, back in the late 50's and early 60's I can remember going into Riverhead from Southold with my parents and looking down at all the ducklings below County Rt 58 as we headed to the traffic circle.  (They had a tunnel right under the road.)  There were two or three duck farms in close proximity to Cty. Rt. 58 and Northville Turnpike and the odor was powerful.

Today, even with modern sewerage technology, if the the air is still and of a certain humidity, you can still get a good whiff of the last operating duck farm on Long Island located in Aquebogue!  It takes me back!! :-)

Don

TCA 08-63024

Add Reply

Post
OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

www.ogaugerr.com
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×
×