Skip to main content

Replies sorted oldest to newest

We have two separate tracks because we have one transformer.  We have one Proto 1 Daylight that runs on the outer track and 3 Lion Chief engines that run on the inner track.  Santa is bringing a Legacy Norfolk Southern that we will eventually (hopefully) upgrade to Command Control.  Everything is currently run in conventional.

Not a track designer, but you might want to incorporate a crossover around where it's marked "track I and track II".

I would also put a tunnel along the short straight opposite the trestle side.

Not sure what you have planned for the center, but a street and intersection might look good.

Depending on what transformer you have, one transformer can power two tracks - just split the wires coming out of the transformer if you want to keep them separate. If you add the crossovers, you will not need to, but you should add extra power drops on the loops, either way.

Last edited by Richie C.

I was going to suggest, for more interest, changing your 2 ovals into one big dogbone, and then fold one end of the dogbone over the other by using your trestle set.  Use your switches for an industrial area in the flat piece (non-elevated) of dogbone.

However, then I remembered the "operation" reason you are running two ovals, conventional & Lionchief engines.  With that restriction, not much you can do but run two ovals in your limited space, but you could try to skew them to the table edges so it doesn't quite look like they are following the plywood.  That might help some.

Chuck

Thanks for the input, Richie C.  When you say crossover, do you mean linking the two ovals together with a switch at ground track level?  Or do you mean using an X-shaped piece in one of the ovals?

I have Z-4000 transformer and it powers both tracks very well.  How do you know when you need to do power drops and how do you do them?

I have a short pre-formed tunnel but once I finalize the layout I was going to try fabricating something more elaborate.  I do have some buildings (including an old red and white Noma station), a crossing, a sign, and trees.

I need to take crash course in electrical with all the wiring and re-wiring!  The track is pretty simple with just two wires but the sign has three wires and the crossing doesn’t seem to mesh well with the conventional setup-I don’t even have it hooked up right now!  I have a few older metal crossing signs and gates too that I haven’t figured out to connect yet.

Don’t get me wrong-I am having a blast with my son piecing all of it together.  There’s a lot of possibilities.  Just gotta acquire some know-how - which is why I am here.

I would suggest a run-around track on the inside loop. You could install a pair of switches and build a cut-off track where your drawing says "036 curves". This will allow you to push cars into some of the facing point sidings you have shown there.

Maybe you could add a passing track to the outside loop. This would allow you to hold a train on the siding while running one on the loop. When ever you felt like it, they could trade places.

@PRR1950 posted:

I was going to suggest, for more interest, changing your 2 ovals into one big dogbone, and then fold one end of the dogbone over the other by using your trestle set.  Use your switches for an industrial area in the flat piece (non-elevated) of dogbone.

However, then I remembered the "operation" reason you are running two ovals, conventional & Lionchief engines.  With that restriction, not much you can do but run two ovals in your limited space, but you could try to skew them to the table edges so it doesn't quite look like they are following the plywood.  That might help some.

Chuck

Thank you.  Sounds intriguing.  Got a picture?

@tncentrr posted:

I would suggest a run-around track on the inside loop. You could install a pair of switches and build a cut-off track where your drawing says "036 curves". This will allow you to push cars into some of the facing point sidings you have shown there.

Maybe you could add a passing track to the outside loop. This would allow you to hold a train on the siding while running one on the loop. When ever you felt like it, they could trade places.

Thank you.  Also, toying with the idea of eliminating the trestles and maybe adding a second level.

I am really trying to maximize our 6x8 space.  Here’s a shot of the first iteration.  I am thinking about creating another separate track above to run conventional for our LionChiefs.  This is what I am considering for Command Control.  Any input would be appreciated.  Thank you.

The second track would be open hopefully so you could look into the “bottom track.”B8D9CE97-3DFE-4C42-940D-FEB70E55D451

Neophyte:

Good idea - add a second level and allocate it to the MTH PS-1 Daylight loco; perhaps with some DEPT 56 lighted porcelain buildings along the route. Designate the lower level to LionChief trains that respond to a handheld controller(s). You are wise to install trackage that goes beyond mere ovals - which quickly become monotonous and boring -- especially for kids because of their short attention span.

CAUTION:  A crossing (either 90 or 45 or 22-1/2 degrees) on one level can be an "accident scene waiting to happen" if multiple trains are running on that track!

Other participants in this thread suggested sidings for storing trains awaiting their call to service. Sidings also provide real estate for placing trackside buildings and/or operating accessories on your layout but off the main line. They offer  "gee whiz" fun for kids; such as these Lionel classics: log dump, log loader, sawmill, oil drum loader, culvert loader and unloader pair (my favorites), barrel ramp loader, operating switch tower, etc.  MTH action accessories with a larger footprint may be added as your layout grows in size:  MTH Firehouse, MTH Car Wash, MTH Gas Station, MTH Mel's Diner (my favorite), etc.

Some trackside accessories don't require a large "footprint" yet provide action, as: crossing gateman, highway crossing gates, block signal, semaphore signal, dwarf signals, etc.  These can be wired to insulated track sections that "trigger" action when a train passes over them. Easy to do and fun to watch.

Carry on ...

Mike Mottler     LCCA 12394

Add Reply

Post
The Track Planning and Layout Design Forum is sponsored by

AN OGR FORUM CHARTER SPONSOR
OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

www.ogaugerr.com
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×
×